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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2012) 92 (2): 373–374.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Joseph L. Arbena Representing the Nation: Sport and Spectacle in Post-Revolutionary Mexico . By Brewster Claire Brewster Keith . New York : Routledge , 2010 . Photographs. Illustrations. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 177 pp. Cloth . Copyright 2012 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2004) 84 (1): 130–131.
Published: 01 February 2004
...Roberto Gonzalez Echeverria Sport in Latin America and the Caribbean. Edited by joseph l. arbena and david g. lafrance. Wilmington, Del.: Scholarly Resources, 2002. Maps. Notes. Bibliographies. xxxi, 241 pp. Cloth, $60.00. Paper, $19.95. 2004 by Duke University Press 2004 Book Reviews...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 204–206.
Published: 01 February 2019
...Joshua Nadel Sports Culture in Latin American History . Edited by David M. K. Sheinin . Pitt Latin American Series . Pittsburgh, PA : University of Pittsburgh Press , 2015 . Tables. Notes. Index. x, 236 pp. Paper , $29.95 . Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 750–751.
Published: 01 November 2018
... Boxers wrapped in Mexican flags have become an iconic image of the patria . Stephen Allen argues in A History of Boxing in Mexico: Masculinity, Modernity, and Nationalism that this national eminence emerged during the 1930s in concert with changing ideals. The sport of boxing both shaped and was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 759–761.
Published: 01 November 2016
.... 221 pp. Paper . Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 As Diego Armus and Stefan Rinke point out in their introduction to this volume, the long neglect of sports by historians of Latin America has been replaced by a remarkable recent reversal. Del football al fútbol/ futebol serves...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 567–568.
Published: 01 August 2017
... literature. The work is a product of the authors' realization in 2012 that despite the progress made in the study of football, little serious work had been done on the impact of the first Perón era (1946–1955), when football had already become by far Argentina's most important sport, and on football's...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 556–558.
Published: 01 August 2017
... the stark contrast with American society, indifferent to playing and watching soccer. There was a desire to turn soccer into a popular sport in the United States, which was encouraged by the purchase of top international players and the formation of very rich clubs, such as the famous New York Cosmos...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 135–137.
Published: 01 February 2017
... understand history without understanding culture, place, and people. He integrated himself into the life of Madrid and spent time following the rhythms of the city and getting to know its neighborhoods, cafés, and bars as well as its libraries and museums. Food, cooking, and sports were as important to him...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 362–363.
Published: 01 May 2018
... millions of dollars to the building of universities, public schools, sports facilities, and hospitals, mostly in Puebla but also elsewhere in Mexico. Paxman has taken an enormously controversial figure in Mexican history and given him a fair hearing. We see Jenkins as a complex, driven, unscrupulous...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2019) 99 (3): 558–559.
Published: 01 August 2019
... expertise in a variety of ways, including as a means of evading whites who tried to sexually abuse them and as a pathway to freedom. Enslaved men participated in “aquatic blood sports” such as shark and alligator fighting and raced canoes as ways of displaying bravery and masculine honor. In these and other...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 724–725.
Published: 01 November 2014
... Argentina. Although his general argument is probably true, some of the evidence he presents to support it is not entirely convincing — in particular, the all-too-linear identification he establishes among the various sports icons, social classes, and political cultures. By strictly associating the military...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 181–183.
Published: 01 February 2017
... engaging history of Latin America's most prevalent sport that adds to our understanding of nationalism and imagined communities. Latin Americans adopted the British-born game in the late nineteenth century, and its rapid spread made it a powerful medium for constructing national narratives. Nadel explains...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 539–540.
Published: 01 August 2014
... accordionist Alberto Pacheco's classic “Cumbia Cienaguera,” the mascot song for the 2008 European soccer championship that put millions of sports fans on their feet, bears little resemblance to the regional ritmo of coastal Colombia. First documented in the late nineteenth century in a Cartagena newspaper in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2004) 84 (1): v–vi.
Published: 01 February 2004
..., edited by Gilbert M. Joseph and Timothy J. Henderson, reviewed by Eric Zolov 127 The Soul of Latin America: The Cultural and Political Tradition, by Howard J. Wiarda, reviewed by Florencia Ferreira 129 Sport in Latin America and the Caribbean, edited by Joseph L. Arbena and David G...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 522–524.
Published: 01 August 2014
... persecuted street-fighting technique into a respectable folkloric practice and organized sport, even performed for Magalhães at the governor's mansion (p. 58). Ickes is careful, however, to note the limitations of these clientelistic exchanges, which took place within a relatively stable system of racialized...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2013) 93 (4): 547–583.
Published: 01 November 2013
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 649–679.
Published: 01 November 2014
... detail of the physical environment in which male workers lived and labored in addition to formulating a variety of programs in vocational training, worker safety, sports and recreation, and codes of conduct. 9 As male workers seemingly failed to adopt acceptable behaviors modeled by administrators...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 107–141.
Published: 01 February 2012
... and historically con- structed in many cases for urban, upper-­class, and international groups rather 6. Harald Höbusch, “Rescuing German Alpine Tradition: Nanga Parbat and Its Visual Afterlife,” Journal of Sport History 29, no. 1 (2002): 50; Harald Höbusch, “Ideologizing Nanga Parbat...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2012) 92 (4): 775–790.
Published: 01 November 2012
... Mexico: An Environmental Interpretation of Cardenismo, 1934 – 1940,” 73 Brands, Hal, Latin America’s Cold War, 387 Brannstrom, Christian (R), 550 Brazil and the United States: Convergence and Divergence, by Joseph Smith, 396 Brewster, Claire, and Keith Brewster, Representing the Nation: Sport and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 845–850.
Published: 01 November 2002
... Society. Edited by brian l. moore, b. w. higman, carl campbell, and patrick bryan. Kingston: University of the West Indies Press, 2001. Notes. xv, 297 pp. Cloth. Sport in Latin America and the Caribbean. Edited by joseph l. arbena and david g. lafrance. Jaguar Books on Latin America, no...