1-20 of 266 Search Results for

skin

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (2): 408–409.
Published: 01 May 2007
...Mark Q. Sawyer Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil . By Telles Edward E. . Princeton : Princeton University Press , 2004 . Maps. Tables. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index . xx , 324 pp. Cloth , $35.00 . © 2007 by Duke University Press 2007...
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Figure 1 Distribution of ethnoracial groups by skin color rating. The mulatto category includes morenos in Venezuela and mestizos/indios in the Dominican Republic. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Figure 2 Percentage of persons with light brown skin color (#4) who identify as white in 17 Latin American countries. Based on regressions for each country with data from 2010 AmericasBarometer. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Figure 3 Percentages of persons with light brown skin color (#4) who identify as white at elementary and college levels of education. Based on regressions for each country with data from 2010 AmericasBarometer. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Figure 4 Percentages of persons with light brown skin color (#4) who identify as white among 25 and 50 year olds. Based on regressions for each country with data from 2010 AmericasBarometer. More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (3): 494–496.
Published: 01 August 1997
... connects Morrison with Márquez, in the penultimate chapter, she connects Gayl Jones with another “male and white-skinned” writer, Carlos Fuentes (p. 171). This is because Jones’s work concentrates on Brazil in the colonial era, “using Brazil as a foil to realities of races and gender in the United States...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (3): 411–449.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Figure 1 Distribution of ethnoracial groups by skin color rating. The mulatto category includes morenos in Venezuela and mestizos/indios in the Dominican Republic. ...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (4): 818–820.
Published: 01 November 1996
... of all else (social class, region of residence, for example), skin color has always mattered in Brazil. Dark-skinned individuals across all social strata suffer prejudice and, more important, discrimination. On the Brazilian color continuum, shades matter; and Eastern European Jews from Poland, Germany...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2001) 81 (3-4): 803–804.
Published: 01 August 2001
... to examine and “demystify” this racist ideology, perpetuated by what he terms the “light-skinned elites.” Very similar light-skinned elites, he asserts, also monopolize power and exercise hegemonic control over blacks and mulattoes in today’s Cuba and Puerto Rico. As such, the approach of this book dovetails...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2023) 103 (4): 732–733.
Published: 01 November 2023
... Malaspina's preoccupation with the evaluation of essential beauty as the foundation of race. The evidence, however, does not fit this interpretation. First, Malaspina sought to ground beauty on skin color, not heads. The entire argument hinged on Matallana's own bodily attraction and pale skin color...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (4): 579–612.
Published: 01 November 2017
... to disentangle the plural meanings of blackness and its relationship to subjecthood and empire in this period. What the cases surveyed do demonstrate is that subjecthood and vassalage were not necessarily dependent on skin color in the early Hispanic world. Such a finding raises an important final research...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (4): 591–625.
Published: 01 November 2010
... “occupation prohibited by law or manifestly offensive to morals and good customs.” 1 The antivagrancy campaign was the legal expression of a larger ideologia da vadiagem , a set of ideas and stereotypes evolving over several centuries that linked dark skin and poverty to backwardness. The most...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (4): 601–631.
Published: 01 November 2011
...: indigenous-African or European-African in the Americas, but also European– North African in Spain. However, the same term could also indicate a skin color, which might be used for a range of individuals belonging to various categories. Today, these two meanings of “mulatto” are deployed in everyday practice...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (2): 335–338.
Published: 01 May 2004
... Paulistas against Getúlio Vargas and the rest of Brazil, particularly the dark-skinned Nordestinos who followed him in the brief civil war of 1932. The naked racism of the Paulistas is shocking. They were the sons or grandsons of the poor—largely Italian immigrants who replaced African slaves on the coffee...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2015) 95 (4): 712–714.
Published: 01 November 2015
...). The task was formidable. The PERLA investigators set out to assess the relative importance of race, ethnicity, and skin color to the lives of ordinary people in a region long noted for the fluidity of its racial and ethnic classifications. Their task was further complicated by the often-sporadic recording...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (1): 172.
Published: 01 February 1965
... problem could be more accurately stated as chromatophobia. His aversion to colors—red Communism, pink Socialism, and “largely dark-skinned” Puerto Ricans —appears with repetitous monotony in every chapter of this thinly disguised racist diatribe. This spectre of a “steady stream of dark-skinned” migrants...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (4): 659–660.
Published: 01 November 1972
... in 1792, even as the whalers first appeared off the Chilean coast, it reached its peak in 1803 and then, owing to the extermination of the sea mammals, declined as dramatically as it had soared. Yankee ships ostensibly engaged only in whaling or taking on seal skins began, especially after the 1795...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (4): 830–832.
Published: 01 November 1975
...John J. Finan Reina’s excellent monograph raises many questions that will doubtless stimulate much further research. Is an overriding characteristic of the close baja darker skin color? What are the national political affiliations of the various social classes and their subdivisions in Paraná...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (1): 130–131.
Published: 01 February 2005
...” society throughout the Western world. Not until 1874 did Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen isolate the organism ( Mycobacterium leprae ) that caused the disease, and not until the 1950s was an effective treatment developed. Until that time, persons afflicted with various skin diseases were labeled as lepers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (4): 752–754.
Published: 01 November 2017
... below them. Yet the diagonal handshake was also a reminder of the existence of classes and could lend itself to more antagonistic readings. Most surprisingly, Adamovsky uncovers substantial evidence of a different version of the coat of arms, one in which a light-skinned arm from above shook hands...