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servant

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (1): 206–207.
Published: 01 February 1990
...Sheldon Leslie Maram House and Street: The Domestic World of Servants and Masters in Nineteenth-Century Rio de Janeiro . By Graham Sandra Lauderdale . New York : Cambridge University Press , 1988 . Plates. Notes. Tables. Glossary. Bibliography. Index . Pp. xii , 212 . Cloth...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (1): 102–103.
Published: 01 February 1975
...: the reader soon discovers that Bonilla develops a rather polemical anti-Capuchin stance. The question formed by the title of the book is merely rhetorical, since the missionaries are here portrayed as “servants of God” in theory, but very much tyrannical “masters of men” in practice. Copyright 1975...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 29–62.
Published: 01 February 2011
... and urban spaces, the labor of childrearing (including wet nursing and fosterage) and the labor of children (as servants and criados ) was mobilized across dense social networks. Even as the circulation of this labor linked disparate social groups, it simultaneously differentiated them, materially...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 129–162.
Published: 01 February 2011
... organizations transformed the legal, social, and political identities of Chilean empleadas (servants). Building on associations formed by the Young Catholic Worker in the early 1950s, household worker activists forged key political alliances in their struggle for increased labor protection prior to the 1973...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 455–491.
Published: 01 August 2008
... brasileira , and Emancipating the Female Sex ; and Besse, Restructuring Patriarchy . 51 Jean Jacques Rousseau, quoted in Sarah C. Maza, Servants and Masters in Eighteenth-Century France: The Uses of Loyalty (Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press, 1983), 301. 50 “A arte da casa moderna...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (3): 593–594.
Published: 01 August 1996
... University Press 1996 Even with the increasing importance of social history in Latin America, we lack much information on the world of servants. This book helps fill the gap for Bolivia, a country where domestic servants are still ubiquitous in middle-class and elite households. Although the author...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1982) 62 (4): 569–606.
Published: 01 November 1982
... racial groups. The Indians were the tribute payers, the producers of food; the Blacks were the skilled and unskilled laborers on sugar plantations and in mines and servants in the great houses of the major cities. The peninsulars were the economically and socially privileged sector, benefiting from...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 97–128.
Published: 01 February 2011
... of domestic help, Doña Petrona further clarified that she was “referring to those families in which they make the food themselves.” 2 As Petrona’s and Lobstein’s texts suggested, while elites continued to enjoy the services of domestic servants, during the mid-twentieth century many middle-class homes...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (3): 353–373.
Published: 01 August 1992
... from the interior swelled the population. 7 Among the women accused in these cases were seven newly arrived European immigrants and three so-called indigenous women from the interior. Interestingly, 22 of the 25 reported cases involved servants, the majority of whom were unmarried and between 15...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (1): 1–37.
Published: 01 February 2005
... herself and her servants. Most community servants would be dismissed and their tasks taken over by the nuns’ personal servants. This change not only embraced but (with the monthly allowance) exaggerated the much-lamented earlier tendency toward discrete, private households in many Mexican convents...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (4): 579–612.
Published: 01 November 2017
..., Contratación 303, no. 2, fol. 23r. 61. For another analysis of free black men and women who traveled as servants, see Garofalo, “Shape of a Diaspora,” 33–36. 60. Lucía Tenorio Palma, 1621, AGI, Contratación 526, no. 1, ramo 1. 59. Inés Pérez, 1593, AGI, Contratación 5241, no. 2, ramo 33...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (4): 694–696.
Published: 01 November 2005
... to recruit and train civil servants dedicated to proto-national goals—the forging of a centralizing monarchy. It was a time of improvisation for the ambitious and literate who sought upward mobility through state service (as Richard Kagan’s Students and Society in Early Modern Spain has shown). Born...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (3): 344–359.
Published: 01 August 1967
... under greater royal supervision and control. In 1475 they appointed Juan de Valladolid, a royal servant, who was known popularly as the “Negro count,” mayoral of the Seville Negro community. 10 After the discovery of the New World the constant demand for a source of cheap labor to work...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1988) 68 (2): 209–243.
Published: 01 May 1988
... living alone or with servants. b Unrelated persons living together. c Multiple families related to each other living in same residence. This information corroborates the correlation between wealth and family size. Non-don households were more likely than a don-headed household...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 357–359.
Published: 01 August 2008
... Copyright 2008 by Duke University Press 2008 This issue of the Hispanic American Historical Review presents four articles on female economic participation in Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil. As landowners, shopkeepers, merchants, borrowers, lenders, servants, and “household managers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (4): 736–738.
Published: 01 November 2016
... of broader trends. . . . and a society where moral deviance was the norm” (pp. 180–81). At times his analysis would benefit from closer juxtapositions. In light of the neighbors, servants, and relatives who stepped in to stop husbands from beating their wives, his assertion that spousal abuse was “socially...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (1): 142–144.
Published: 01 February 1969
... know very little about its institutional structure, and even less of the royal servants who staffed it. Thus M. A. Norton’s unpretentious and direct biography of Don Pedro Miguel de Almeida Portugal is a welcome contribution. He begins by tracing Don Pedro’s early experience as an infantry captain...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 February 2011
....” For the women they employed, meanwhile, “the halo around the words home and domestic seemed ironic.” Phyllis M. Palmer, Domesticity and Dirt: Housewives and Domestic Servants in the United States, 1920 – 1945 (Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Press, 1989), 150, 87. 28 Ana Lau, “El nuevo movimiento...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1974) 54 (2): 260–283.
Published: 01 May 1974
... who provided agricultural labor for the community formed the lowest sector of the society. The intermediate sector of skilled laborers, artisans and domestic servants contained free and slave blacks and mulattos, Indians and mestizos, and persons of European origin. The elite which directed...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (1): 83–99.
Published: 01 February 1999
... wanted to help educate and support these women. Philanthropy was a long-standing goal in New Spain, and the good intentions demonstrated by the owners of these homes undoubtedly helped a state with limited resources. Nine documents specifically mention, however, that women were sent to work as servants...