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scientist

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2003) 83 (3): 586–588.
Published: 01 August 2003
...Alejandra Bronfman Wizards and Scientists: Explorations in Afro-Cuban Modernity and Tradition. By stephan palmié. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002. Appendix. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xi, 399 pp. Cloth, $64.95. Paper, $21.95. 2003 by Duke University Press 2003 Book Reviews...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 107–141.
Published: 01 February 2012
... mountaineer-scientists who went to Peru, especially the Austrian leader Hans Kinzl, as well as examining government documents, technical reports, tourism publicity, diplomatic correspondence, and travel accounts to understand how Peruvian policy makers, engineers, scientists, intellectuals, tourism boosters...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2010) 90 (3): 423–454.
Published: 01 August 2010
..., prison reformer Elizabeth Fry, utilitarian philosophers Jeremy Bentham and James Mill, scientist Humphrey Davy, and vaccination proponent Edward Jenner. Their conscious choice to draw closer to Great Britain, rather than Napoleonic France or the early republican United States, reveals much about the kind...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 173–209.
Published: 01 May 2008
...Alejandra Irigoin; Regina Grafe Social scientists use the history of Spain and her empire as a standard against which they establish the relatively superior efficiency of Anglo-Saxon institutions. This historical “experiment” underpins the core argument of new institutional economic history. This...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 469–502.
Published: 01 August 2011
... him arguably the best-known medical scientist in the country. As the federal director of public health and the director as well of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, he appeared to be well positioned to collaborate fruitfully with RF initiatives in public health and medical education. Yet in many respects...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 327–328.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Montt, a future president, and the Prussian brothers Bernardo and Rodulfo Philippi, who extended Chile's territorial boundaries and directed Santiago's Museo Nacional, an axis of the scientific community. Schell's sampling of scientists, including “a high school teacher, a future priest, a sailor, and a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 391–392.
Published: 01 May 2015
... intellectual history that evenly tacks back and forth across the border while remaining grounded in the historical particularities and historiographies of both nations. Flores coins the term “backroads pragmatists” to describe policymakers and social scientists in Mexico and the United States that drew on...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 741–743.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Ryan Edwards Still, some questions can be raised concerning Larson's approach. While reexamining the established country-city binary, the work relies on its own dichotomies, such as inside versus outside actors (in other words, scholars versus the public), space versus place, scientists versus...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 381–383.
Published: 01 May 2019
... supply of government-affiliated scientists, social scientists, and even North American movie stars. Together they generated significant publicity and produced studies that created knowledge about the region and promoted colonization. ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 768–769.
Published: 01 November 2016
... authenticity. The book also reveals how little we know about the history of people involved in drug activities, as prisoners, or in gangs in Brazil, even now with the small army of ethnographers (anthropologists, sociologists, political scientists) engaging their present lives and predicaments. Priceless...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 541–542.
Published: 01 August 2018
... movement were forward-looking in their quest to make new opportunities for themselves, rather than backward facing in a desire to re-create the old South as they imagined it. Wahlstrom's exploration of the colonization movement uses the writings of Confederate naval officer and scientist Matthew...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2001) 81 (2): 309–342.
Published: 01 May 2001
... even more formal association with historically grounded research and train- ing, something social scientists familiar with his work had long admired. Regrettably, that brief tenure at NYU was not to produce the new generations of historians one might...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 391–408.
Published: 01 August 2011
... acceleration of Brazilian industrial development.3 Among the important and innovative characteristics of that era of state plan- ning was the role given to scientists in formulating and implementing policies and funding for this field, in line with the new models and challenges stemming from the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 409–429.
Published: 01 August 2011
... process by which Latin Ameri- can scientists and state officials sought out and adopted (but also debated and at times disputed) prominent European and North American ideas about racial hygiene and racial engineering. Inherent to this story, according to Stepan, are the specific racial ideologies...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2009) 89 (4): 571–572.
Published: 01 November 2009
... informal diplomatic branch of the Mexican state. The prominence of Mexican sanitary science was grounded on at least two factors. First, the expo- sure of Mexican scientists to the latest European technologies of disinfection and sanitation placed them at the vanguard of the international movement for...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 740–741.
Published: 01 November 2016
... practitioners are generally overlooked in narratives of the history of medicine in Peru, which have been constructed around the contributions and lives of a few notable creole doctors and scientists. Focusing on the period between 1760 and 1840, José R. Jouve Martín aims to rectify this oversight by singling...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 759–761.
Published: 01 November 2016
... his essay on Brazilian social scientists' increasing willingness to challenge nationalist narratives of the sport (p. 195). Football has been an important way that Latin Americans have engaged the world, and this volume serves as a call to future scholars for further comparative work. Finally...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 769–771.
Published: 01 November 2016
.... It is a well-presented and easy-to-read publication that contains the results of research carried out between 1990 and 2011 by two competent political scientists—Rebecca Abers (University of Brasília) and Margaret Keck (Johns Hopkins University)—on the new framework of water governance in Brazil...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 556–558.
Published: 01 August 2017
... scientists have critiqued this journalistic way of narrating a mythologized version of soccer's history, then impressive is Bocketti's ability to give this debate fresh content while not being swayed by the naive exoticism or stereotypes to which, as a foreigner, he could have been easy quarry. On the other...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 570–572.
Published: 01 August 2017
...” established by “the country's best historians and social scientists” under the banner of New History (p. 8). In the author's view, New History's emphasis on inequality prevented Colombians from understanding that “illegal drug money was the real source of the conflict” (p. 187). He thus proposes that the...