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samba

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): 389–390.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Bryan Mccann The Mystery of Samba: Popular Music and National Identity in Brazil. By hermano vianna. Translated by john charles chasteen. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. Notes. Index. xx, 147. Cloth, $34.95. Paper, 15.95. 2000 by Duke University Press 2000 HAHR...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 330–332.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Jack A. Draper, III Making Samba: A New History of Race and Music in Brazil . By Hertzman Marc A. . Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2013 . Photographs. Maps. Figures. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xvii, 364 pp. Paper , $25.95 . Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2010) 90 (4): 591–625.
Published: 01 November 2010
... venues in which black men were judged as members of a free society. Some musicians played samba and a number used malandragem, the lifestyle and ethos of flashy, masculine, malandro hustler figures, to cater to audience desires and also to distinguish themselves from caricatures of sickly, weak vadios...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2010) 90 (4): 589–590.
Published: 01 November 2010
... pioneers of samba to the images that their contemporaries, and they themselves, chose to construct. Afro-­Brazilian musicians at the turn of the century created personae that contrasted sharply with the destitution with which vagrancy laws and asso- ciated ideologies tarred Brazilians of African...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2010) 90 (4): v.
Published: 01 November 2010
... Award. Before moving to Columbia, he was an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Latin American Studies at Wesleyan University. His work has appeared in Journal of Latin American Studies, and he is currently completing a book manuscript on samba, race, and intellectual property in post...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2009) 89 (1): 3–39.
Published: 01 February 2009
... Power and Soul Grand Prix at the Portela Samba School. The resulting report, whose subject heading (assunto) “Black Power” conflated the name of the group with suggestions of black radicalism, reveals the police’s primary concern with the preferential treatment organizers showed to people of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 174–175.
Published: 01 February 2018
... little-known second-tier samba school called Beija-Flor, advanced economically and politically by showcasing military government propaganda in the samba school's carnival theme. As a result, Beija-Flor earned a first-tier berth in the highly competitive carnival competition, a status that it has enjoyed...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 342–343.
Published: 01 May 2018
... music (p. 47). Carmen Miranda in the United States represented Latino identity and became the fantasy image of the exotic surrounded by glamour and sex appeal. A similar pattern occurs in Miranda's reception from a musical standpoint. She played a fundamental role in the creation of samba as a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2014) 94 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 February 2014
... (décadas de 30 e 40) . Recife, Brazil : CEPE . Gonçalves Rafael Soares . 2010 . Les favelas de Rio de Janeiro: Histoire et droit, XIXe et XXe siècles . Paris : L’Harmattan . Guimarães Valéria Lima . 2009 . O PCB cai no samba: Os comunistas e a cultura popular, 1945-1950 . Rio de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 249–258.
Published: 01 May 2016
... song, a lyric. Samba is Brazil. Puerto Rico is salsa. Black music is authentic. While I fully support this forum's call to spend more time exploring the sonic archive, I would like to strike a somewhat dissonant tone and suggest that while we can and should think about music and history in new ways...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 211–215.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., Danzón ; Moore, Music ; Wade, Music ; McCann, Hello ; Zolov, Refried Elvis ; Hertzman, Making Samba ; Dunn, Brutality Garden . 3. Sterne, Audible Past ; Thompson, Soundscape ; Kahn, Noise ; Smith, Listening ; Lacey, Listening Publics ; Weheliye, Phonographies ; Cavarero, For More than...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 507–535.
Published: 01 August 2012
... changing contexts. The symbols of popular nationalism — samba, carnival, and soccer — had not changed with the coup, after all, and the new otoridades were just as ready as their predecessors to embrace these symbols when it served their purposes. As a journalist who wrote eloquently about both...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 161–162.
Published: 01 February 2018
... dancers borrowed creatively from US popular culture and the rhetoric of civil rights to challenge conceptions that black Brazilians should dance samba and deny the existence of racism. In doing so, these dancers also challenged the dogma of Brazil's nascent Movimento Negro Unificado (Unified Black...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2006) 86 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2006
... of Santos during the last quarter of the nineteenth century reports that on Saturday nights the young abolitionists would pay visits to the quilombo to drink quentão (a hot beverage made from cane brandy and spices) and to watch the samba dances. Then “on Sundays...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2007) 87 (4): 693–726.
Published: 01 November 2007
... Chasteen has called “national rhythms”: popular musical and dance forms born of the meeting between African and European artistic traditions and incorporating elements from both. As such, these rhythms — Argentine and Uruguayan tango, Brazilian samba, Colombian cumbia, Cuban rumba and son...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 71–102.
Published: 01 February 2015
... the twentieth century. 11 Compared to other arts, music was relatively cheap to produce, easily transmitted — by radio, the mass medium par excellence — and ideal for conveying educational messages to a mostly illiterate population. 12 Son in Cuba, samba in Brazil, tango in Argentina, and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): 378–379.
Published: 01 May 2000
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): 379–381.
Published: 01 May 2000
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): 381–382.
Published: 01 May 2000
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): 382–384.
Published: 01 May 2000