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royalist

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (3): 470–489.
Published: 01 August 1973
... In spite of the celebrated heroics of the insurgents and of their often admirable experiments with free institutions, it is plausible to argue that the royalist factions managed to meet with tenacity and ingenuity each crisis from Viceroy Iturrigaray’s flirtation with criollism in 1808 to Iturbide's...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1953) 33 (4): 526–537.
Published: 01 November 1953
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1982) 62 (1): 19–48.
Published: 01 February 1982
... the sum of 1,120,509 pesos between Sept. 3, 1813, and Aug. 1, 1816, for the cost of Iturbide’s Operational Division. Total royalist forces in New Spain came to approximately 45,000 men with some 44,000 auxiliary forces. The French kept 360,603 troops in the Iberian Peninsula in January 1810, of whom...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (2): 237–269.
Published: 01 May 2011
...Marcela Echeverri Abstract This article examines the royalist forces that rose in defense of the colonial order in the southwestern region of New Granada, Colombia, a royalist stronghold where slaves and local Indians united with Spanish forces to fight against independence armies. Enslaved blacks...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (2): 203–235.
Published: 01 May 2011
... lay at the center of the Revolution of 1814–15 in the southern Andes. This “revolution of the patria” started in Cuzco in 1814 but soon captured Arequipa, Huamanga, and much of Charcas, until its military defeat by royalist forces in 1815. It not only proposed full independence from viceregal control...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (3): 463–494.
Published: 01 August 1999
.... Guedea’s work on Mexico City elections during the first constitutional period also reveals the importance of increasing popular participation in the political life of the colony. A dramatic evolution of political identities occurred even within “royalist” Mexico; see Virginia Guedea, “El pueblo de Mexico y...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2001) 81 (2): 382–384.
Published: 01 May 2001
...Brian R. Hamnett Earle correctly emphasizes the divisions within the royalist camp in the Americas. These were particularly severe at all levels between 1815 and 1820. The present reviewer would certainly endorse her comment that “the origins of Spanish American royalism need explanation as much...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1966) 46 (2): 201–203.
Published: 01 May 1966
... Sergio Elías Ortiz’ collection of documents is an interesting addition to published source material concerned with Colombia’s war for independence. Apparently impressed with the ample documentation of patriot activity and the relatively few published royalist accounts dealing with New Granada’s...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1961) 41 (2): 206–235.
Published: 01 May 1961
... and by desertions, would not be able to regroup effectively if given the opportunity to sack the capital. 2 But of greater though more subtle significance was the psychological victory which the royalist defenders had won in the weeks before Las Cruces without benefit of musket or grape. Hidalgo and militia...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1987) 67 (4): 724–725.
Published: 01 November 1987
... suffered by José María Morelos in 1814 left the insurgency leaderless and in an unequal strategic position against the royalist army. In part, he accepts the traditional interpretation that there was a reduction in the insurgency by 1816 when many rebel leaders accepted royal amnesty. In fact, however...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (4): 705–714.
Published: 01 November 1981
... marching to raise the siege of Guanajuato, commanders such as Félix María Calleja and Manuel de Flon (Conde de la Cadena) wrote letters begging the defenders of the Alhóndiga to hold out. In the meantime, the royalist officers fretted and vacillated, paralyzed by fears that New Spain was collapsing about...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (3): 434–435.
Published: 01 August 1964
... blood was spilled than in the French Revolution (p. 101), cannot be interpreted as a rebellion in favor of the royalists. The pueblo venezolano were not capable of being champions of the king. Those who inculcated love of the king and authority of the monarch were the clergy. In places like the llanos...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1998) 78 (3): 367–418.
Published: 01 August 1998
... the elites. Popular insurgents fought for independence from 1810 to 1821, but it was a coalition of the former royalist army and established elites that was at the core of the alliance that Agustín Iturbide forged in founding the nation. Although popular guerrillas proved essential to liberal victories over...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (2): 199–201.
Published: 01 May 2011
... stretch from Lima to Rio de la Plata. Cahill notes that Carrascón’s “high profile in the separatist politics of the southern Andes is another salutary reminder that Latin American independence was not just a creole endeavor,” an argument that is also central to Marcela Echeverri’s “Popular Royalists...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1974) 54 (4): 657–681.
Published: 01 November 1974
... political and military problems shortly to be encountered, was the fact, already suspected by the royalists, that Lima was not the base from which independence could be won. The powerful and more solidly based royalists had been bitterly divided themselves over the question of Lima’s role as their base...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1998) 78 (2): 336–337.
Published: 01 May 1998
... University Press 1998 This book describes the fiscal policies of both the royalist and republican regimes in Venezuela during the epoch of independence. The author emphasizes the contending factions’ quest for fiscal control, “the whole set of activities designed by the state to collect, regulate...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (4): 675–693.
Published: 01 November 1981
... of Peru in The Military and Society in Colonial Peru, 1750-1810 . There I examined the Túpac Amaru rebellion primarily to test the proposition of military reformism, but also concentrating on the changes taking place in the royalist military as they portended Independence. This article constitutes part...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (1): 206.
Published: 01 February 1969
... Domingo Díaz and Juan Francisco Sánchez belonged in opposite camps, Díaz being a convinced royalist and Sánchez a passionate patriot and republican. The very diversity of their lives teaches us a great deal about the status of medicine in Venezuela during these critical years. Díaz was born of unknown...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (4): 481–490.
Published: 01 November 1964
... of the province. His first command was an observation expedition into royalist Upper Peru. As a result of the expedition’s success he was promoted to capitán. His subsequent military career included service with Balcarce in Upper Peru in 1811, attachment to the General Staff in Buenos Aires, and participation...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (4): 765–766.
Published: 01 November 1969
... royalist naval power and prepared the way for the invasion of Peru. As his friend Casimiro Albano remarked: “The whole ambition of O’Higgins was to make of Chile the England of South America” (p. 236). After his overthrow by Ramón Freire in 1823 O’Higgins went into exile in Peru, where he was given...