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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 97–128.
Published: 01 February 2011
...Rebekah E. Pite Abstract Over the course of the mid-twentieth century Doña Petrona C. de Gandulfo established herself as Argentina’s leading domestic expert. Her popularity reached new heights when she began broadcasting her cooking lessons on television with her assistant, Juanita Bordoy...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (3): 421–443.
Published: 01 August 2016
... New Spain. Raised as a girl, Aguilera upon reaching adulthood petitioned ecclesiastical authorities to order a physical inspection of his body so that he could be declared a man and marry Clara Ángela López. The essay shows how both abjection and criminality—or a discourse of “queerness”—led Aguilera...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (3): 407–438.
Published: 01 August 2018
...Lina Del Castillo Abstract When recognition of independence lay tantalizingly out of reach, officials of the first Colombian republic devoted funds and expertise toward hiring French-trained naturalists for an expedition. These officials' plan to gain diplomatic recognition of Colombia through...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (2): 209–245.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Sueann Caulfield Abstract The case of Hermelinda Permínia de Jesus versus Roberto da Trindade de Jesus was apparently the last in a series of disputes over judicial legitimization to reach Brazil's Supreme Court in the late nineteenth century. Analysis of the litigation between the two claimants...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2021) 101 (3): 461–489.
Published: 01 August 2021
... for the state's lack of control over the frontiers. Beginning with its March to the West program, the government used aviation to quickly explore and colonize vast territories previously out of its reach. The military radically transformed this method in the 1960s, using napalm and paratroopers to quickly create...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1946) 26 (4): 593–598.
Published: 01 November 1946
... Nuno Tristao returned in a caravel, passing Cabo Verde and Rio Grande, and he reached another [river] that lies beyond in 20° [north latitude], where they [the natives] killed him with eighteen [other] Portuguese; and with four or five [survivors] the ship returned in safety. It is related in addition...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (3): 627–628.
Published: 01 August 1991
..., in that task. After arriving and embarking on a preliminary six-month journey in 1531 that reached the foothills east of Lake Maracaibo, Féderman launched a three-year expedition in 1535-39 to the Colombian highlands. He marched southeast, crossed the Andes, and arrived on the plains of Santa Fé de Bogotá...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (4): 750–751.
Published: 01 November 2010
... Press 2010 Laura Jarnagin’s book is ambitious in its chronological and geographic reach. She aims to reconstruct how networks of kinship, religion, and business formed in the Atlantic world since the seventeenth century prepared the ground for Confederate migration to Brazil after the U.S. Civil...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (4): 767–768.
Published: 01 November 2017
... and the League of Nations' universalism. We know in detail about Europeans reaching into Latin American diplomatic worlds during the 1920s and 1930s. This book offers a look at Latin Americans reaching in the opposite direction. More importantly, their behavior and its impact defy the usual stereotypes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (1): 119.
Published: 01 February 1978
.... It does, however, help focus attention on Spain’s role in the Southwest. Although the explorers failed to reach the stated objective of Monterey in California and they did not open new mission fields, the expedition is famous as a last event in the long history of Spanish exploration in the northern...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1946) 26 (4): 450–466.
Published: 01 November 1946
... to another until they reached the Paraguay, where they were well received by the local Guaranis. The Portuguese held a great council with the natives and persuaded two thousand of them to form a war party to go with the white men to dis­ cover and reconnoiter those lands from which could be brought fine...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (4): 621–641.
Published: 01 November 1972
.... The news must have also quickly reached the Court, then residing in Alcalá de Henares. Most likely it was Juan Antonio, the admiral’s cousin and majordomo, who delivered Columbus’ letter to the Catholic Sovereigns. The latter were doubtless pleased with the discoveries, but Columbus’ prophetic tone, his...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (2): 320–321.
Published: 01 May 1963
... 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 The official name of the Galápagos Islands—and title of this book—is an unhappy result of the few occasions on which politicians become “historical minded.” For, not only did the great discoverer fail to reach the Pacific Ocean; but even its very existence...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (4): 545–546.
Published: 01 November 1963
... University Press 1963 The official name of the Galapagos Islands—and title of this book —is an unhappy result of the few occasions when politicians become “historical” minded. For not only did the great discoverer fail to reach the Pacific Ocean, but its very existence even was opposed to his...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (2): 380–381.
Published: 01 May 1991
... at the southwestern end of the Appalachian Mountains. In 1566, Menéndez sent Capt. Juan Pardo and 125 soldiers inland from Santa Elena to find such a road and to bring the native inhabitants under Spanish control. Pardo and his men traveled northward, reaching a major native town at the foothills of the Blue...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (3): 470–471.
Published: 01 August 1972
... in the acquisition of Gambia in West Africa and Tobago in the West Indies. The Couronians held the title to Tobago, a claim that was not unchallenged by other European powers, during the second half of the seventeenth century. The first Couronian expedition arrived in Tobago in 1639, and the last one reached...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (1): 82–90.
Published: 01 February 1977
..., he was convinced that he had reached India, or the Indias, since according to medieval geographers there were three of them, which encompassed most of southern and southeastern Asia. As early as October 17, in his Diario , he referred to the natives of the newly discovered islands as “estos indios...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (4): 743–744.
Published: 01 November 2013
... in the hierarchy of explanations. Additional factors highlighted by Mapp include the distance of the West from the established colonial centers of each group and the difficulties in reaching the interior of what is now the United States. Spaniards faced a lengthy and difficult overland trek to reach California...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (2): 314–315.
Published: 01 May 2005
..., while the scribes believed that that to write was to create” (p. 93). A sixteenth-century writer had to reach out to literary images originating in known cultural patterns. “The problem was even more complex, as descriptions were regulated by elaborate norms centered not on objectivity but on general...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (2): 307–308.
Published: 01 May 2005
... American states have historically sought an involvement in the societal order deeper than that found in, say, Anglophone polities. But Waldmann is correct as well, in a series of multiple assertions: (1) the reach of Latin American states has consistently exceeded their grasp, more so than in the European...