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quetzaltenango

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Published: 01 February 2009
Figure 2 Reina Indígena of Quetzaltenango, 1978 – 79. La Nación/Quetzaltenango , August 14, 1978. More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (1): 83–111.
Published: 01 February 2004
..., 1998), 59, 177. 27. Hendrickson, Weaving Identities , 99. 26. Manifestación que la sociedad “El Adelanto” de indígenas de Quetzaltenango . . . hacen al señor presidente, Museo de Historia, Quetzaltenango. 25. See Carol Elaine Hendrickson, Weaving Identities: Construction of Dress...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (1): 41–72.
Published: 01 February 2009
...Figure 2 Reina Indígena of Quetzaltenango, 1978 – 79. La Nación/Quetzaltenango , August 14, 1978. ...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (4): 754–755.
Published: 01 November 2004
... articles on Quetzaltenango focus on the Kiché-Maya elite and middle strata. Grandin chronicles the elite’s construction of public buildings and monuments, as they laid claim to the national rhetoric of progress. He also charts their ability to outmaneuver ladino municipal officers by successfully...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (3): 423–461.
Published: 01 August 2020
... (today called San Cristóbal de las Casas), in the highlands of central Chiapas; Quetzaltenango, in the western Guatemalan highlands; and Santiago de Guatemala, in Guatemala's central highlands. 19 Census records ( padrones ) for all three regions are housed in the Archivo General de Centro América...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (2): 394–396.
Published: 01 May 2003
...-century Quetzaltenango, has given us the most detailed description of the state’s formation and its political evolution. While he perhaps assumes too much knowledge on the part of some readers regarding the political issues and personages of Guatemala and Central America, the work nevertheless adds...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (3): 431–466.
Published: 01 August 2006
..., and privileges of a Spanish city, the designation of “republic,” and thus the status of a sovereign pueblo. 25 Nonetheless, Indian pueblos were political and territorial units, forming several jurisdictions within the kingdom whose cabeceras (district capitals) like Quetzaltenango (Guatemala) and Matagalpa...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (4): 652.
Published: 01 November 1964
... This welcome monograph contains the 1872 text of an anonymous 19th-century dance-drama telling how Pedro de Alvarado conquered Quetzaltenango in 1524. One of the two indigeous leaders—Tecum Umam—prefers death to defeat, but the other—the Quiché king Quecab (an anachronism, sisee he reigned c. 1470)—prefers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (2): 335–336.
Published: 01 May 2008
... in Nicaragua or the ever-present tension between Comayagua and Tegucigalpa in Honduras. And lest we forget, the colonial weight of Guatemala City intimidated not only future Salvadorans and Hondurans but also appeared to suffocate the regional contenders from Quetzaltenango and Chiquimula. To realize...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (2): 353–354.
Published: 01 May 2019
... for the writing of history highlighted, even if problems of dating them, and ascribing authorship, are present at every turn. The Título de Quetzaltenango y Momostenango y conquistas de nuestros antepasados , for instance, is thought by one ethnohistorian to have been “produced between 1550 and 1560,” while...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2021) 101 (2): 350–352.
Published: 01 May 2021
... to literate urban ladina women and edited by the Lappara sisters, two fascinating women from a poor ladino family in Quetzaltenango. They advocated for a reimagined Liberal Party modernization that included women, poor people, and Catholic workers, and they created a space in which women intellectuals were...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (3): 501–534.
Published: 01 August 2006
... (1945 – 51) and Colonel Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán (1951 – 54), Guatemalans enjoyed free labor. 28 Coffee expansion did not immediately or universally threaten Mayan communities, however. It was only gradually that the state and habilitadores encroached upon Mayan labor and land. Quetzaltenango...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (4): 600–618.
Published: 01 November 1973
... of impeachment proceedings. The Guatemalan assemblymen were not disposed to impeach Barrundia, but neither were they inclined to offer further opposition to the president. Under the leadership of Lieutenant Governor Cirilo Flores, the state government transferred its headquarters to Quetzaltenango, until...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (3): 635–657.
Published: 01 August 1996
... the Liberal revolt of 1871, which marked the region’s conquest of the nation-state. Gregory Grandin (Yale University) charted the effects of these transformations on the indigenous elites of Quetzaltenango and discussed some of the theoretical and historiographical implications of his work. Finally, Todd...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1976) 56 (3): 438–460.
Published: 01 August 1976
... Guatemala (Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, 1971). 96 El Guatemalteco , Aug. 4, 1883, p. 3; House Executive Document No. 50 , p. 187; Chester Lloyd Jones, Guatemala, Past and Present (New York, 1958), p. 210. 97 El Diario de Centro América , June 30, 1882, p. 1; House Executive Document...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1974) 54 (3): 387–413.
Published: 01 August 1974
..., landholding villages were most likely to be situated in “relative proximity” to colonial urban centers—Guatemala City, San Salvador, Quetzaltenango, Mazatenango, and Escuintla. 38 The standard arrangement was a one-story masonry structure with a high slightly sloping roof supported by beams...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (2): 291–318.
Published: 01 May 2016
... . Pittsburgh, PA : University of Pittsburgh Press . Litigio entre Juan Magee y Guillermo José Forsyth sobre la finca de café “San Juan las Chicharras.” 1893 . Quetzaltenango, Guatemala : Tipográfico “La Industria.” Loveman Brian . 1979 . “ Critique of Arnold J. Bauer's ‘Rural Workers...
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Hispanic American Historical Review (2021) 101 (2): 265–295.
Published: 01 May 2021
... dramatized charity and the president's benevolence. By the turn of the century, Guatemala had fourteen hospitals in service and four under construction. Eight of these hospitals were located outside the capital city, in the departmental capitals Quetzaltenango, Antigua Guatemala, Amatitlán, Escuintla...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2023) 103 (2): 251–282.
Published: 01 May 2023
... with Antequera, Quetzaltenango, Chimaltenango, Santiago de Guatemala, and other highland Mesoamerican and Spanish American market centers. Indeed, one of the most prominent secondary branches of the camino real from Santiago led straight to Xicalapa. 40 Juan Bautista from Miahuatlán surely traveled this road...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (2): 251–284.
Published: 01 May 2022
... The government only enforced these laws regarding prostitution in the capital, in maritime ports, and in Quetzaltenango, the country's second major city. 46 This emphasis on controlling sex workers highlights the repressiveness of Guatemala's public health system. Beginning in 1871, when Guatemala...