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quarantine

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Published: 01 February 1999
Fig. 2: Quarantine card included as a loose document in NACP, USPHS, RG 90, CF 1897-1923, file 1248. More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (3): 537–538.
Published: 01 August 2013
... in the 1860s, public health concerns became a part of the national reconstruction plans of both nations. The USMHS received the power to develop policies to meet epidemics, implementing its first military quarantine in response to an outbreak of yellow fever in Brownsville, Texas, in 1882. The quarantine...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (1): 41–81.
Published: 01 February 1999
...Fig. 2: Quarantine card included as a loose document in NACP, USPHS, RG 90, CF 1897-1923, file 1248. ...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (1): 149–150.
Published: 01 February 1975
... by Duke University Press 1975 The anatomy of major foreign policy decisions is of lively interest to many scholars and practitioners alike. And the 1962 decision of the United States to impose a selective quarantine on Cuba, in order to compel extraction of Soviet offensive missiles, is certainly...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (2): 365–368.
Published: 01 May 1991
... that quarantine measures gradually eliminated bubonic plague by limiting its spread. In the early eighteenth century smallpox accounted for some 10-15 percent of all deaths in Europe. The use of inoculation by variolation and later the Jenner cowpox vaccine reduced the impact of smallpox. For example, between...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (2): 369–373.
Published: 01 May 1991
... as we take up the study of comparative health conditions in other Latin American cities. As Jackson points out, even before the development of a modern scientific understanding of the origin and spread of disease, some public health care measures were still effective. Quarantining and vaccination...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (4): 609–637.
Published: 01 November 1990
.... Romero Yellow fever quarantine Bubonic plague quarantine Smallpox quarantine Treated Died % Treated Died % Treated Died % Treated Died % Treated Died % Treated Died % Treated Died % Treated Died % Treated Died % 1818 — — 17...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (4): 619–644.
Published: 01 November 1997
... been universally accepted as contagious entities, capable of spreading from person to person. 48 Efforts to protect populations from such scourges in the late eighteenth century therefore centered on refining and strictly enforcing age-old policies of quarantine and isolation in hopes of restricting...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (2): 423–425.
Published: 01 May 2007
... commerce and the early use of quarantines to prevent the spread of disease and then examines the first international organizations that sought to coordinate health and trade, as well as research in bacteriology and parasitology that led to advances in the control of disease. The international coordination...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (4): 573–602.
Published: 01 November 2009
... implementing measures so that those diseases cannot be transmitted to a neighboring country, this government cannot, for its own dignity, accept that agents of another State come and impose upon it as an obligation that which it is already doing voluntarily. 76 Licéaga protested the Texas quarantine...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 February 1992
... governments were also interested in improving public health in their ports and cities as a means of avoiding the effects of quarantine and attracting the coveted European migration. Yellow fever posed a threat not only for foreign colonists but also for travelers, who carried the potential to reinfect...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (1): v.
Published: 01 February 2013
... católica a la república rosista (2004); and Ovejas negras: Historia de los anticlericales argentinos (2010). paul ramírez is assistant professor of history at Northwestern University and the author of “ ‘Like Herod’s Massacre’: Quarantines, Bourbon Reform, and Popular Protest in Oaxaca’s Smallpox...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (4): 654–655.
Published: 01 November 1964
... John F. Kennedy’s televised speech announcing a “quarantine” on military shipments to Cuba—doubtless one of the greatest moments of peril in the history of the human race. The selections are edited for brevity, and, with a few exceptions, taken from generally available sources: the collected...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (3): 471–473.
Published: 01 August 1965
...—stymied now, enmeshed in a bureaucratic labyrinth—is a mirage, another power-play. All aid, he believes, inevitably helps the wolves who guard the sheep. “Gradualism” is a demagogic effort to quarantine Cuba, a reactionary Putsch to patch up the existing ugly power structure that widens the gulf between...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (4): 692–693.
Published: 01 November 1997
... and in Vasco de Quiroga’s “hospital-towns” in mid-sixteenth-century New Spain is said to equal the “spiritual quarantine” (p. 151) administered by the Jesuits in their seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Guaraní reducciones . What is more controversial, these, in turn, lead straight to Latin American fusions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (4): 571–572.
Published: 01 November 2009
... to quarantines and other disruptions of commerce. Public health was therefore central to the Porfirian modernization project. Moreover, the Mexican Superior Health Council, which joined the American Public Health Association in 1890, came to act as an informal diplomatic branch of the Mexican state...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (4): 732–734.
Published: 01 November 2009
..., and the belief in Haiti that the United States created the disease to maintain its power and exterminate the poor. Cuba’s initial policies against AIDS — aggressive cleansing of the blood supply, massive HIV testing, and strict quarantine of HIV-positive individuals — are seen as the Cuban revolutionary state’s...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (2): 288–290.
Published: 01 May 1968
... avoided the extremes of either deprecating the Indian way of life or glorifying the noble savage (“Pero yo quiero ser juez imparcialísimo de los indios . . .” [II, 109]). Gilij was much concerned with the destruction of the Orinoco tribes by introduced diseases, and he took elaborate quarantine...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (3): 553–554.
Published: 01 August 2012
... corporal punishment and exile considered not effective against idolaters, the church established in Oaxaca a perpetual prison for indigenous religious leaders to quarantine the idolatrous “contagion.” But the mid-eighteenth-century Oaxaca prison for teachers of idolatry survived only until the 1760s...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (1): 157–158.
Published: 01 February 2017
... of the Jesuits from Spanish territories in 1767, led to significantly higher death rates. Jackson concludes that “the new civil administration did not respond as effectively to the outbreak”; in other words, the Jesuits had implemented much more effective quarantine measures than these later officials because...