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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1958) 38 (2): 273–275.
Published: 01 May 1958
...William A. Trembley Copyright 1958 by Duke University Press 1958 Port-au-Prince: Documents pour l’histoire religieuse . By Jan Jean Marie . Port-au-Prince , 1956 . Editions Henri Deschamps . Index . Pp. xix , 527 . Collecta, pour l’histoire du diocese du Cap-Haitien...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (2): 205–245.
Published: 01 May 2006
... Rio de Janeiro coffee merchants’ community. 54 Ulick Ralph Burke and Robert Staples Jr., Business and Pleasure in Brazil (London: Leadenhalle, 1882), 37. Unlike the port city of Santos in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro did witness the emergence of solidly organized, primarily black port...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (4): 619–644.
Published: 01 November 1997
... at Cádiz and had settled in the gulf port after service in the Real Armada. AGN, Protomedicato, vol. 1, exp. 6, fols. 280–303. On the college of surgery at Cádiz and its progressive curriculum, see Michael E. Burke, The Royal College of San Carlos: Surgery and Spanish Medical Reform in the Late...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1947) 27 (3): 456–466.
Published: 01 August 1947
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1943) 23 (1): 5–20.
Published: 01 February 1943
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1942) 22 (2): 309–343.
Published: 01 May 1942
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1920) 3 (4): 588–591.
Published: 01 November 1920
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1971) 51 (2): 295–312.
Published: 01 May 1971
... important source of Indian slaves, timber, dyewood, naval stores, and foodstuffs for the Viceroyalty of Peru. The great bulk of this traffic moved through the port and villa of Realejo, at the head of a mangrove-lined estuary some 8 kilometers up river from the modem Pacific coast port of Corinto. Today...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 553–554.
Published: 01 August 2008
...Ana R. Suárez Porte Crayon’s Mexico: David Hunter Strother’s Diaries in the Early Porfirian Era, 1879 – 1885 . Edited by Stealey John E. iii . Kent, OH : Kent State University Press , 2006 . Photographs. Plates. Illustrations. Maps. Appendixes. Notes. Index . xi , 1,085 pp...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (3): 501–531.
Published: 01 August 2019
...Joshua Savala Abstract This article centers cross-border solidarity in the post–War of the Pacific (1879–83) context in Peru and Chile. I examine the ways in which some maritime and port workers in these countries in the early twentieth century created bonds of solidarity despite the reigning...
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Published: 01 August 1981
CHART 1 Nine Spanish Ports. Value of Trade with the Indies (Estimates), 1792-1820 (millions of reales de vellón ; constant prices). Sources: Tables III , IV . CHART 1. Nine Spanish Ports. Value of Trade with the Indies (Estimates), 1792-1820 (millions of reales de vellón; constant prices More
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Published: 01 August 1981
CHART 3 Nine Spanish Ports, Great Britain, United States, and France. Value of Transatlantic Trade (Selected Series), 1792-1820 (millions of reales de vellón; constant prices). Sources and Procedures: Tables IV , III , and Appendix III . CHART 3. Nine Spanish Ports, Great Britain, United More
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Published: 01 August 1981
CHART 4 Nine Major Spanish Ports. Value of Trade with the Indies (Estimates), 1792-1820 (millions of reales de vellón; market prices). Source: Table V . CHART 4. Nine Major Spanish Ports. / Value of Trade with the Indies (Estimates), 1792-1820 (millions of reales de vellón; market prices More
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Published: 01 August 1981
CHART 2 Nine Spanish Ports. Value of Trade with the Indies (Estimates), 1792-1820 (1792 = 100; constant prices). Sources: Tables III , IV . CHART 2. Nine Spanish Ports. / Value of Trade with the Indies (Estimates), 1792-1820 (1792 = 100; constant prices). Sources: Tables III, IV. More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (2): 233–256.
Published: 01 May 2020
...Arne Bialuschewski Abstract In 1665 a native man named Juan Gallardo joined a raiding gang near Granada, Nicaragua, and remained for the next five years among the most notorious English, Dutch, and French freebooters. He stayed in the raiding bases of Port Royal and Tortuga, he sailed with Henry...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (2): 171–203.
Published: 01 May 2013
... the Caribbean coast of Central America, landing in most cases “by accident” at the Honduran port of Trujillo while allegedly en route to Veracruz. Many of the West Central Africans carried on these voyages were subsequently marched inland by the same Portuguese merchants to be sold in Santiago de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (4): 635–667.
Published: 01 November 2018
... Portes Gil government to plot a way out of the religious crisis. It did so by providing a mutually acceptable means for priests to register with the postrevolutionary state and by providing a discursive mechanism for the Catholic clergy to present itself to the regime as a national, less Rome-oriented...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (3): 399–429.
Published: 01 August 2019
... the making and unmaking of the intraimperial circuits that supplied slaves to Spanish America. This approach reveals the inner workings, evolving links, and disputed hierarchies that interlocked port towns with inland cities and also structured the African diaspora in Spanish America and the emergence...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (1): 3–34.
Published: 01 February 2020
...Pablo Miguel Sierra Silva Abstract This article focuses on the experiences of women of African descent who were made captives (and, in some cases, recaptives) after the 1683 buccaneer raid on Veracruz, the most important port in the Viceroyalty of New Spain (colonial Mexico). Although the raid is...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (3): 559–560.
Published: 01 August 1984