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poison

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (1): 3–39.
Published: 01 February 2010
... Andean camelids, the bezoar stone played a significant yet academically overlooked role in the social and economic history of modern Europe and Spanish America for its use as an antidote to poisons, and the stones constituted one of the most sought-after objects for the fashionable cabinets of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1974) 54 (2): 360.
Published: 01 May 1974
...G.W. The Poisoned Water: El agua envenenada . By Benítez Fernando . Translated by Ellsworth Mary E. . Foreword by Davis J. Cary . Carbondale, Illinois , 1973 . Southern Illinois University Press . Pp. vii , 152 . Cloth. $7.95 . Copyright 1974 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (3): 582–583.
Published: 01 August 1979
... region that technology is contaminating its natural resources. For example, the United Nations director of the Latin American Environment Office warns that larger crops in Central America depend on insecticides which are poisoning water systems. Will Central American governments be willing to rely on...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (3): 605.
Published: 01 August 1984
... Capitalist World Economy, C hristopher C hase -D unn ; Dependent Reproduction in the World System: A Study on the Incidence of Dependency Reversal, V olker B ornschier ; Foreign Policy Costs of Economic Nationalism: Poisoning the Well?, N eil R. R ichardson ; The Dialectics of Dependency Reversal...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (2): 383.
Published: 01 May 1991
... proved a treacherous midwife: Panama was born unfree. Over the decades that followed, this poison seeped through the country’s body politic, the fiction of independence masking what was, in reality, a colony. LaFeber conveys with sensitivity and compassion the drama of this poor, warped country—subject...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (4): 644–645.
Published: 01 November 1964
... potatoes. Though he accepted some of the misconcepts of his time, in general he observed, reported, and experimented to verify; when he tested poisons on animals he used controls, and continued observations. He had his own small plant garden with medicinals, both native and American. He was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (4): 753–754.
Published: 01 November 1968
... amphibia are many tree frogs and toads of brilliant coloration and dangerously poisonous. The fish include such oddities as electric eels and the voracious piranhas (pirayas). The insects, of course, are outstanding not only because of their diversity and evolutionary interest, but also because of their...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (2): 234–235.
Published: 01 May 1964
... introducing the poison of its ideas in Europe” is one which must oft have been heard during these times. Considering the brevity of this publication, Professor Defourneaux traces his subject with extreme accuracy and systematically concludes that the Inquisition did not close Spain to the secular “Society...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (1): 179–180.
Published: 01 February 2004
... abuses became notorious, Frei became one of the military’s most public critics. Frei died in 1982 during a routine hernia operation, and some suspect he was poisoned. With his death, Gazmuri says that the country lost “the one Chilean personality who was perceived as capable of confronting the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (4): 755–756.
Published: 01 November 1999
... diaries most obviously invite comparison with those of the infamous Thomas Thistlewood of Jamaica. We find similar abundant detail on slave management, the sugar business, and agricultural practice; there are dramatic episodes detailing suicides, revolts, and poisoning scares. Dessalles, however, was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (1): 140–141.
Published: 01 February 1997
... conceived, as it is the automobile, rather than the factory, that has poisoned the Mexican capital and turned this once beautiful city into the planet’s most polluted urban concentration. This book offers fresh insights useful to students of the political economy of development and urban studies. One...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (3): 602–603.
Published: 01 August 1975
... institution of curfews, sumptuary laws, slave patrols, more rigorous physical punishments, and restrictions on assembly. Slaves responded to these measures in the only way they could—running away, stealing, malingering, poisoning, murdering, and burning. That some were even willing to go as far as to revolt...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (1): 127–128.
Published: 01 February 1970
... Salamanca, resolutely rejects the traditional view of Carranza. He holds that the arrest of the archbishop was a grievous mistake attributable to ecclesiastical in-fighting, to personal animosities and jealousies, to “the spirit of the times,’’ poisoned by excessive fear of Protestant inroads in the country...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (4): 671–672.
Published: 01 November 1973
..., significant and enduring contribution of Latin America to a world poisoned by deeply rooted racism. ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1971) 51 (1): 142–143.
Published: 01 February 1971
... became a resident mission in July, 1701. Its first resident missionary, Juan de San Martín, did not last a year. It took exactly thirty years to replace the departed Jesuit with another resident missionary, Juan Bautista Grazhoffer, who arrived in May, 1732, and was poisoned promptly the following...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1982) 62 (3): 528–529.
Published: 01 August 1982
... Latin America currently suffers widespread degradation of its natural environment. Among the examples he cites are deforestation in Mexico and the Amazon Basin, pollution of ocean waters in proximity to large coastal cities, widespread erosion, and the poisoning of soils from herbicides, pesticides, and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (3): 514–515.
Published: 01 August 1994
..., poisoning, theft, possession of firearms, desertion, and arson. New Orleans, as the only sizable North American port between Veracruz and Charleston, also attracted a rowdy transient population that mixed with people of color and with many of the miserable common soldiers who garrisoned the city. Indeed...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (3): 452–453.
Published: 01 August 1964
... Austria, the poor king’s mother; Marie Louise, Carlos’ first wife, said to be a French spy for Louis XIV; and the second wife, María Ana of Neuburg. Through the book there runs a thread of witchcraft, superstition, poison, and the Devil. So fascinated is the author with his material that he spends an...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (4): 549–551.
Published: 01 November 1963
... which left ulcerous sores. They also suffered and died from food poisoning due to improperly preserved meat. They report malaria suffered by natives and Europeans alike. The quina bark had not yet been introduced from Peru. Dysentery was occasional; so was infectious diarrhea. The reference to Bubas...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (3): 470–471.
Published: 01 August 1965
... restoration of tourist traffic. Mexico offers no relief in this surge of complaint and pessimistic evaluation: “A new robber baron era is swinging into high gear . . . labor leaders are in jail, editors and painters are in jail: the poison of power and injustice seeps in everywhere . . . a new...