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poison

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2010) 90 (1): 3–39.
Published: 01 February 2010
... camelids, the bezoar stone played a significant yet academically overlooked role in the social and economic history of modern Europe and Spanish America for its use as an antidote to poisons, and the stones constituted one of the most sought-after objects for the fashionable cabinets of curiosities...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 534–535.
Published: 01 August 2017
... often horrendous practices, worthy of a television series like Criminal Minds . The ritual violence of sacrifice explored in 15 separate chapters includes exsanguination, strangulation, slaying, butchering, possible poisoning, live burial, heart ablation, defleshing, dismemberment, forced joint...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 358–359.
Published: 01 May 2015
... poisoning conspiracy. In the decades between the Seven Years' War and the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1814, Britain garnered eight new colonies in the Caribbean. These recently acquired territories, Candlin maintains, constituted an unstable “Caribbean frontier at the edge of empire” (p. xxii). In contrast to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 338–340.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Santa Bárbara mine opened, the urban center of Huancavelica grew to its north, and their mercury ensured that Potosí's silver continued to flow, keeping Philip II's global ambitions afloat. All that it cost was the lives or health of the Peruvian miners whose encounter with that mercury poisoned their...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 715–716.
Published: 01 November 2018
...). And this is not to say anything about the—to use a deeply compromised term—supernatural dangers arising from a society riven with deep inequalities and antagonisms expressed and experienced in the form of falling victim to spells, poisoning, and sorcerous assaults! As Gómez argues, such traction...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 507–535.
Published: 01 August 2012
... figures, see “Conversa de Redação,” interview with Rubem Braga, Sérgio Porto, Fernando Sabino, and José Carlos Oliveira, Realidade, Oct. 1967, p. 45. 3. Some Porto fans believe that military operatives caused or at least hastened Porto’s death; one theory holds that secret agents poisoned Porto’s...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 409–429.
Published: 01 August 2011
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 481–515.
Published: 01 August 2016
... capable of curing. Of course, agents deemed hazardous to the human population, either physically or spiritually, had long been visualized as repugnant creatures. Marcia Stephenson has shown that early modern visual representations rendered poison as reptilian, demon-like beings, the best example of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 1–30.
Published: 01 February 2019
.... A second influential medical theory, the miasma theory of disease, linked corporeal health to air. Air purity influenced how denizens evaluated the suitability of a particular location for human habitation. Foul-smelling airs spread poisonous vapors through the atmosphere and caused illness. 12...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 431–443.
Published: 01 August 2011
...- ism, syphilis, and tuberculosis — were “germs” or “racial poisons” that could be acquired by children of affected parents, then intrusive public health campaigns were imperative in order to halt degeneration. Since the publication of The Hour of Eugenics scholars have continued to document...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2003) 83 (2): 295–344.
Published: 01 May 2003
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 439–469.
Published: 01 August 2018
... welcoming Chilean commanders in the provincial capital of Ica and inviting them to take charge to prevent looting; Chinese warned Chileans about poisoned water wells and buried land mines, which Peruvian troops had planted before fleeing the area. 25 Such narrative details countered the robust criticism...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2003) 83 (1): 119–150.
Published: 01 February 2003
... cause became fur- ther medicalized and politicalized, with coca painted as causing a mass alka- loidal “poisoning” or “addiction” of Indians, a position advanced by most pro- Indian elite indigenistas. By the 1930s, a whole branch of Peruvian science flourished, led by doctors Luis Saenz and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2000) 80 (1): 77–112.
Published: 01 February 2000
... river there is a gold mine, and in the surrounding region various coca haciendas, where bananas, pineapples, papayas, limes, granadillas, and other fruits of the montaña are harvested. Also various poisonous insects live there. For protection against...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2005) 85 (2): 187–222.
Published: 01 May 2005
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2009) 89 (4): 643–673.
Published: 01 November 2009
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2014) 94 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 February 2014
... of Cold War conflict, acrid ideological jockeying, corrupt profiteering, and political demagoguery poisoned the intri- cate and heterogeneous alliances that had preserved Rio’s rapidly expanding favela communities from mass eradication in the 1940s and 1950s. In cooper- ation with anticommunist...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 455–486.
Published: 01 August 2014
... “health” and “vital resistance” would be ruined. Likewise, it was hoped that, thanks to the science of nutrition, “ the kitchen [would become] a laboratory where the raw materials, which are raw or unprocessed foods, must be transformed into healthy and digestible meals, and not into poisons that are all...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 319–353.
Published: 01 May 2016
... authority and power and relying on promises of glorious martyrdom.” 65 Several ACJM militants declared that they had met at her house for prayer sessions and to conspire. Some militants implicated her in the plans to kill Obregón, testifying, for example, that she had provided them poison. 66 Another...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2001) 81 (2): 343–346.
Published: 01 May 2001