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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (3): 573–574.
Published: 01 August 2011
... of 60 followers of opposition candidate José Vasconcelos in 1930. Maximino’s political skills came in handy after the Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR) was created in 1929. The PNR was designed to channel and contain the ambitions of revolutionary generals like Maximino, preventing them from...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (4): 776–779.
Published: 01 November 1984
... he was elected president as the candidate of the Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR). The eldest of five sons in a family of eight children, Cárdenas left school at the age of 12 and entered the world of work when his father’s health and business (grocery store with pool table) began to fail...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (2): 333–334.
Published: 01 May 1979
... developed with two of its political rivals, the CROM and the PNR, in its gradual takeover of state politics. The inevitable confrontation between the Veracruz agraristas and the Callista-dominated national government trying to retain control over national politics and to reverse the course of the agrarian...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (2): 370–371.
Published: 01 May 2022
... actually formed the basis of the Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR). This is a big claim. But Osten does a fine job of meticulously laying out the connections between the beginning of Mexico's one-party dominant state and the infrapolitics and socialist organizing of Yucatán, Tabasco, and Chiapas...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (4): 774–776.
Published: 01 November 1984
..., they maneuvered to determine who among them would wield political authority. At root, this is a tale about a struggle for power. The thesis of the volume is that the central political developments of the period were the formation of the Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR) and the consolidation of political...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (3): 521–522.
Published: 01 August 1978
... accounts, and, occasionally, short comments by Ochoa Campos. The themes treated include social institutions, administrative reorganization, educational and cultural policies, economic and banking institutions, the creation of the PNR, and snippets on Calles’ pre-presidential background. The obvious intent...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (2): 325–326.
Published: 01 May 1978
..., agencies, and banks; ambassadors to the United Kingdom and the United States; governors of states and territories; rectors and directors general of UNAM and Instituto Politécnico Nacional; members of national executive committees of the PNR, PRM, and PRI; presidents and secretaries general of the PAN...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1987) 67 (4): 725–726.
Published: 01 November 1987
... of the Confederación de Trabajadores de México (CTM) in February 1936, and the second details the CTM’s offensive during 1936 and 1937 to fight for the rights of labor and its efforts to forge a political alliance with the official party, the PNR. The authors rightly assert that the formation of the Comité Nacional de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1995) 75 (1): 128–129.
Published: 01 February 1995
... not always have the same projects; nor does he elucidate the conflicts between local, state (regional), and national elites and governments. These conflicts provided the political space from which the pueblo could establish and maintain its autonomy. We have no idea, for example, how the PNR/PRM/ PRI...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (4): 744–745.
Published: 01 November 1979
... instrument of control. Emilio Portes Gil, though an able, energetic revolutionary, was unable to withstand Calles; President Ortiz Rubio tried to control congress but failed when Calles loyalists in the PNR expelled the Ortizrubistas from the party. These books make a commendable and valuable sweep...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (2): 371–373.
Published: 01 May 2012
... “for more than 70 years,” as is often said, the party and its forerunners, the Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR, 1929 – 38) and the Partido de la Revolución Mexicana (PRM, 1938 – 46), changed significantly over time. Bertaccini suggests that one such shift in the character of the party took place...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (3): 570–572.
Published: 01 August 2012
... the 1920s in the form of the Cristero War, pitting a secular state against religious rebels, and that it was not until 1946 that the PRI formed from its predecessor parties, Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR) and Partido de la Revolución Mexicana (PRM). Navarro details the understudied internal divisions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (3): 493–495.
Published: 01 August 1979
....” Since Meyer is completely confused (p. 15) about the dates that the PNR was reorganized to become the PRM (1938, not 1933) and the PRI (1946, not 1938), the reader can begin to understand how he can make the following statement in all good faith: “From the Presidency of Avila Camacho to the present day...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1988) 68 (2): 382–386.
Published: 01 May 1988
..., but they are not entirely successful in grappling with the question of whether Aguilar was simply the mouthpiece of his father-in-law or acting on his own free will. Aguilar returned from exile after the Agua Prieta revolt, reentered politics as a Tejedista, and later became a loyal PNR supporter. Despite his outspokenness...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (3): 393–444.
Published: 01 August 1994
... in Mexico,” in Mexico: Dilemmas of Transition , ed. Neil Harvey (London; Institute of Latin American Studies, 1993), 42-44. 6 Pérez H. equipped himself with an unusual business card that read: “First Secretary of the Ministry of Agriculture. Deputy to the Federal Congress. Member of the PNR...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2002) 82 (4): 645–683.
Published: 01 November 2002
... independence—to give women the vote. And the PCM feared that too much emphasis on women’s rights would represent “bourgeoisie” policies that placed women’s issues above class. 82 Adelina Zendejas, a member of the PNR and the PCM in another state, said that female communists had to fight against more...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (4): 635–667.
Published: 01 November 2018
... state formation, in that it placated Catholic opposition and federalized control over church questions. It is suggestive, too, that this shift occurred at a signal moment in the broad process of regime building: the gestation of the National Revolutionary Party (PNR), forerunner of today's Institutional...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1998) 78 (3): 457–490.
Published: 01 August 1998
... American Research Review 31, no. 3 (1996). 32 Building on Calles’s Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR), Cárdenas created the Partido de la Revolución Mexicana (PRM). It was renamed the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) in 1946. 31 Thomas Benjamin, “La Revolución : Memory, Myth...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1987) 67 (3): 371–404.
Published: 01 August 1987
... level substantially influenced developments in the Laguna. At the end of June 1935, local affiliates of the CSUM, the left wing of the Liga Socialista (affiliated with the official National Revolutionary Party [PNR]) and the Sindicato Progresista de Obreros Metalúrgicos de Torreón formed the Federación...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 73–106.
Published: 01 February 2012
... and Secretary of the Partido Nacional Revolucionario (PNR), articulated a particularly influential interpretation of the state’s responsibility to campesinos. “The Revolution has produced ejidal agriculture, as well as small- and medium-scale agriculture,” he declared. “These campesinos are the bedrock...
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