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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1931) 11 (4): 519–521.
Published: 01 November 1931
...James Alexander Robertson Machu Picchu: A Citadel of the Incas. Report of the Explorations and Excavations made in 1911, 1912 and 1915 under the Auspices of Yale University and the National Geographic Society . By Bingham Hiram . ( New Haven : Yale University Press , 1930 . Pp. xiii...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (3): 588–590.
Published: 01 August 2020
...Christopher Heaney Making Machu Picchu: The Politics of Tourism in Twentieth-Century Peru . By Mark Rice . Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , 2018 . Photographs. Maps. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xvi , 233 pp. Paper, $29.95 . Copyright © 2020 by Duke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1949) 29 (2): 276.
Published: 01 May 1949
...John Howland Rowe Lost City of the Incas: The Story of Machu Picchu and Its Builders . By Bingham Hiram . ( New York : Duell, Sloan and Pearce , 1948 . Pp. xx , 263 . $5.00 .) Copyright 1949 by Duke University Press 1949 ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (4): 767–769.
Published: 01 November 2019
...Mónica Salas Landa Despite Hall's sound examination of photography's role in the making of Machu Picchu in part 2, this analysis is preceded and followed by a set of chapters devoted to topics not always as explicitly and cohesively tied to the project's central aims. For example, the first part...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (3): 500–502.
Published: 01 August 2005
...Sonia Alconini Valencia Zegarra, the Peruvian archaeologist responsible for the most substantial archaeological work in Machu Picchu since Hiram Bingham, provides a detailed account of the recent archaeological findings in the site’s lower east flank agricultural terraces, ritual caves...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (2): 362.
Published: 01 May 1981
...Izumi Shimada Since its exciting discovery in 1911 by Bingham, Machu Picchu and its splendor have been the subject of a good deal of writing, due largely to the effective unity between its natural setting of cloud-covered granite peaks rising above the Río Urubamba and magnificent artificial...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 143–171.
Published: 01 February 2012
... of the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu. The transformation of the Inca Trail from overgrown path to global hiking destination began in the early twentieth century. Foreign and Peruvian scientific expeditions socially constructed the trail as natural and cultural heritage. State and corporate actors sought...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1971) 51 (1): 228.
Published: 01 February 1971
.... In addition to detailed descriptions and historical accounts of Cuzco and nearby sites, both prehistoric and contemporary, there is a major section on the well known archaeological site of Machu Picchu. However, only those sites which contain spectacular architectural features are mentioned. Judging...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (3): 549.
Published: 01 August 1968
..., and into the misty Andes. The saga begins with Columbus and concludes in 1911 with Bingham’s discovery of Machu Picchu. Hanson, a professional geographer, devotes the first three chapters to the historic and geographic setting, and to the native inhabitants. Later chapters treat Columbus; Vespucci; the conquests...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (4): 679–680.
Published: 01 November 1968
..., was found with jars and beakers and with adult and child companions. Other illustrations cover additional sites in both north and south, including the celebrated constructions at Sacsayhuaman and Machu Picchu. A number of photographs show the Inca roads, twenty feet or more wide, winding around slopes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (2): 339–340.
Published: 01 May 1994
... travelers and scholars. Literally millions of visitors have made the journey to sites like Machu Picchu, Ollantaytambo, and Sacsahuaman. The new paperback is a lushly illustrated volume with more than 150 dramatic black-and-white photographs by Edward Ranney, supplemented by site plans and maps...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (3): 518–519.
Published: 01 August 1969
... the Peruvian coast, views of Machu Picchu and other archaeological sites, gold work from Colombia, and some Maya stela or stone carving. What is interesting about the specimens illustrated by Anton and Dockstader is that many of them have not appeared in print before, because they belong to private collectors...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): v–vi.
Published: 01 February 2012
... energy landscapes and on Inca Trail tourism and local livelihoods. A manuscript on the cultural politics of heritage conservation and tourism in Machu Picchu is in progress. Another of her research projects analyzes historic and contemporary vicuña conservation and commodification. mark carey...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (1): 149–150.
Published: 01 February 1985
... Valley of the Incas,” roughly midway between Cuzco and Machu Picchu, Ollantaytambo included by the sixteenth century a large mix of Inca nobles, relatives, allies, and yanaconas , in addition to the valley’s ancestral inhabitants. Its ecology and commercial possibilities encouraged colonization...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (2): 276–277.
Published: 01 May 1963
... illustrations of the Inca site of Machu Picchu. This site presents us with significant data on Inca architecture, because it has not been built over like Cuzco, for instance, but rather remained unknown since Inca times until Hiram Bingham’s expedition discovered it. Disselhoff’s text on Greater Peru...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (2): 340–342.
Published: 01 May 2012
... the train to Machu Picchu) that takes one above the city to the ruins of Saqsaywaman and then to other mysterious rock formations. The guides have wonderful tales to appeal to the curious soul expecting New Age energy vibrations and landing towers for aliens. Those tales are also infuriating to serious...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (3): 560–562.
Published: 01 August 2016
..., Vilcabamba receded into the colonial periphery until Hiram Bingham's 1911 expedition brought lost Inca sites new global attention. For most of the past century, Vilcabamba remained inaccessible to all but the most determined explorers, even as the development of the nearby site of Machu Picchu offered ever...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (2): 339–340.
Published: 01 May 2017
.... xv, 268 pp. Paper , $45.00 . Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 For all the attention that has been paid to the magnificent Inca site of Machu Picchu, we know surprisingly little about the intimate landscapes where life took place within Inca royal estates. Insightful, evocative...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (1): 123–125.
Published: 01 February 2005
...). The brutality of the Chuquicamata mines in northern Chile led the future guerrilla to conclude that communism “was no more than a natural longing for something better” (p. 78). Visiting the Machu Picchu ruins and, more importantly, traveling in the company of indigenous peasants led Che to recognize “a race...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (3): 584–585.
Published: 01 August 2006
..., including the feminists. William Row’s contribution on Latin America poetry exhibits fine, poetic prose itself as it surveys the field. He calls Neruda’s “Alturas de Maccho Picchu” an interrogation of the past sounding a “terrible grief for the nameless, forgotten dead,” which reminds me of my native...