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Published: 01 August 1990
FIGURE II: Percent of House Ownership of RUs (Within Each Race and Sex) Santa Bárbara, 1823 FIGURE II:. Percent of House Ownership of RUs. / (Within Each Race and Sex). / Santa Bárbara, 1823 More
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Published: 01 November 1996
FIGURE 6: Rate of Illegitimacy per Year in Santa Ana Parish, Panama City, 1898-1931 (percent) Source: Parish records, Santa Ana church, vols. 1-7. FIGURE 6:. Rate of Illegitimacy per Year in Santa Ana Parish, Panama City, 1898-1931 (percent). / Source: Parish records, Santa Ana church, vols. 1 More
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Published: 01 May 1985
GRAPH 9: Slope of the line (regression coefficient as log); 1701-1800=0.003132; 1701-1751=0.002992; 1752-1800=0.004446. Rate of growth (percent per annum): 1701-1800=0.7; 1701-1751=0.7; 1752-1800= 1.0. R-squared: 1701-1800=0.83. GRAPH 9:. Slope of the line (regression coefficient as log More
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Published: 01 May 1985
GRAPH 8: Slope of the line (regression coefficient as log): 1680-1810=0.002590; 1700-1809=0.006564; 1715-1751=0.011091; 1752-1809=0.007232; 1751-1786= 0.006082. Rate of growth (percent per annum): 1680-1810 = 1.4; 1700-1809=1.5; 1715-1751 = 2.6; 1752-1809=1.7; 1751-1786=1.4. R-squared: 1680 More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1976) 56 (4): 580–604.
Published: 01 November 1976
... , in any given year, from different places in Spain to different regions in America. The most striking facts about Spanish emigration to America between 1560 and 1579 are that roughly three out of every four emigrants hailed from the southern half of the peninsula and that 28.5 percent of all emigrants...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1980) 60 (4): 746–751.
Published: 01 November 1980
... are rejected try again. Of the 71 articles received during the 1979-1980 year, we accepted 12 (approximately 17 percent). Were the journal not moving we probably would have accepted a few more for 1981 publication but we believed it preferable to retain a large pending category so that the new editors can...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (1): 52–72.
Published: 01 February 1981
... 20,000 to maintain a constabulary of 2,400 policemen. The 50 percent increase indicates increasingly hard times for the constabulary. Put another way, from 1885 to 1890 the Rurales took in 3.93 men for each budgeted slot. In the next decade, the ratio climbed to 4.72, and from 1901 to 1910 to 7.11...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1988) 68 (2): 289–319.
Published: 01 May 1988
... analysis of comparative growth rates in nineteenth-century Latin America, together with a reevaluation of the Paraguayan censuses and household structure, indicates that the War of the Triple Alliance actually cost Paraguay between 8.7 and 18.5 percent of its prewar population. A discussion of military...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (4): 635–667.
Published: 01 November 2018
... below 20,000 (our cutoff point for localities deemed not major cities) are, in descending order, Michoacán (88 localities, 70 percent of all priest-served localities in the state), Guanajuato (58, 72 percent), Oaxaca (58, 67 percent), Mexico (42, 79 percent), Jalisco (37, 43 percent), Guerrero (29, 100...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1980) 60 (1): 32–48.
Published: 01 February 1980
.... The most notable characteristic of the population of Buenos Aires during the decades surrounding the turn of the past century was its rapid growth. In 1869, Buenos Aires was a small city of 187,346 people. During the next eighteen years, the population grew 131 percent, reaching 433,375 by 1887. It more...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (4): 794–799.
Published: 01 November 1979
... Spain Total 7 1 2 5 3 3 3 5 1 15 Of the 72 submissions during the 1978-1979 reporting year, we were able to accept 11 or 15.28 percent. Taking into consideration that some of those articles listed in Chart I as pending will probably be accepted, our acceptance rate...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (2): 279–325.
Published: 01 May 1985
...GRAPH 9: Slope of the line (regression coefficient as log); 1701-1800=0.003132; 1701-1751=0.002992; 1752-1800=0.004446. Rate of growth (percent per annum): 1701-1800=0.7; 1701-1751=0.7; 1752-1800= 1.0. R-squared: 1701-1800=0.83. GRAPH 9:. Slope of the line (regression coefficient as log...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (4): 778–783.
Published: 01 November 1978
... , the acceptance rate for articles was 27.42 percent and the rejection rate 72.58 percent. The comparable figures for the two-year period ending July 1, 1977 were 24.43 percent acceptances and 75.57 percent rejections. Last year we observed that Mexico and Brazil dominated article submissions. We took special...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1987) 67 (4): 712–714.
Published: 01 November 1987
..., and 1784. The published Balanza del comercio of 1792 Fisher finds misleading; here Cádiz’s exports were undervalued by 24 percent, far below what individual ships’ registers filed at Cádiz reveal. Avalúos (official values) established in the reglamento del comercio libre of 1778 are his basis...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 February 1979
... not then and does not now seem to indicate community membership, and very few transients can be identified in the period 1531-1534 (they form only 3.1 percent of the total known population in these years). Residents are more easily identified, primarily from land grants of 1531-1534 and from censuses made in 1532...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (2): 185–219.
Published: 01 May 1989
... controlled almost 80 percent of Viotá’s land ( Table I ). 18 Medium-sized estates, between 100 and 1,000 fanegadas, 18 in number, held slightly over 18 percent of the land. A handful of small plots occupied the remaining 2 percent. There were, however, variations within different sections...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1986) 66 (4): 743–765.
Published: 01 November 1986
..., and two others who were elected but did not serve. 2 São Paulo’s political leadership was related to its economic preeminence. From 1889 to 1937, coffee produced 40 to 70 percent of Brazil’s export earnings, and São Paulo accounted for the bulk of the country’s coffee; in fact, the state produced...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (2): 223–257.
Published: 01 May 2005
... measures of inequality. The Gini coefficient of the São José sample discussed above would rise from 0.66 to 0.83 if we assumed that 50 percent of households held zero wealth. However, the assumption that 50 percent of households held no wealth is not particularly credible, given what we know about...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 361–391.
Published: 01 August 1993
..., as the administrative and ecclesiastical center not only for the city of Salvador but also for the captaincy. Sé was also the largest parish in Salvador. In 1801, 21.8 percent of the population resided there. 7 Salvador developed as the major export city for sugar and later for tobacco, with the Bahian Recôncavo...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (3): 444–475.
Published: 01 August 1979
... by a few trading families. From 1763 to 1810, 20 merchants imported one-third of the value of Antioquia’s imports (1,974,050 pesos or thirty-three percent of 5,971,913 pesos), a substantial intermediary group of 106 traders accounted for another third (2,171,828 pesos or thirty-six percent total), and 902...