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patrol

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (3): 586–588.
Published: 01 August 2011
...F. Arturo Rosales Migra! A History of the U.S. Border Patrol . By Hernández Kelly Lytle . American Crossroads. Berkeley : University of California Press , 2010 . Photographs. Map. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index . xv, 311 pp. Paper . $21.95 . Cloth , $55.00 . Copyright...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (2): 394–396.
Published: 01 May 1996
...Robert A. Potash Argentina’s Lost Patrol: Armed Struggle, 1969-1979 . By Moyano María José . New Haven : Yale University Press , 1995 . Map. Tables. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index . xiii , 226 pp. Cloth . $25.00 . Copyright 1996 by Duke University Press 1996...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1980) 60 (4): 716.
Published: 01 November 1980
...W. Dirk Raat Border Patrol: With the U.S. Immigration Service on the Mexican Boundary, 1910-1954 . By Perkins Clifford Alan . Edited by Sonnichsen C. L. . El Paso , 1978 . Texas Western Press, UTEP . Illustrations. Index . Pp. ix , 126 . Cloth. $10.00 . Copyright 1980...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (3): 531–534.
Published: 01 August 2014
...), and resource maximization (by generating larger budgets) — do not fully explain mission performance. Rather, what most directly explains mission performance are “mission beliefs” (institutional beliefs about “what missions the army should perform”) and “a drive to maintain predictability for patrols...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (2): 323–344.
Published: 01 May 1970
... the mobile detachments assigned to patrol national roadways; all others remained the financial responsibility of state and municipal authorities. In the sense that they were federally paid, Lafragua’s guards who protected the roads can be considered direct predecessors of the Rurales. Besides combatting...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (3): 585–586.
Published: 01 August 2011
... borders during this period changed from nominally “guarded” to heavily patrolled, despite increases in resources, illegal border crossings continued. This “ungovernability” of the border, Ettinger argues, reveals not only the limits of state power in enforcing national boundaries but immigrants’ creative...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1982) 62 (2): 321.
Published: 01 May 1982
... by Duke University Press 1982 This book is primarily a description of the mass deportations of Mexican undocumented workers in 1954. García casts the deportation in the historical context of the Bracero Program, United States immigration policy, and Border Patrol operations. The author’s argument...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (4): 798.
Published: 01 November 1981
... is the growing organization and defense of the undocumented immigrant in areas such as back-wages procurement, guarantees of right to counsel, and union organizing. The attitude is succintly captured by farmworker organizer Guadalupe Sánchez: “Would you rather be chased by the Border Patrol while making one...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (3): 602–603.
Published: 01 August 1975
... with the institution of curfews, sumptuary laws, slave patrols, more rigorous physical punishments, and restrictions on assembly. Slaves responded to these measures in the only way they could—running away, stealing, malingering, poisoning, murdering, and burning. That some were even willing to go as far as to revolt...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (4): 864–865.
Published: 01 November 2006
... aftermath of the rebellion, Tejanos came to embrace their American citizenship and fight politically for the ideal of “multiracial democracy” (p. 293). Alexandra Minna Stern explores the creation of the U.S. Border Patrol. Stern tells a tale of a hardening border, racist medical quarantines, and punitive...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (4): 637–676.
Published: 01 November 1989
... by army officers. This military police corps also had 400 men in its ranks by 1850, including a headquarters staff of 10 officers and senior noncommissioned officers, 116 cavalry, and 274 infantry. Armed with two pistols and a sabre, military police soldiers patrolled the streets in small units...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (3): 473–488.
Published: 01 August 1969
... ships were patrolling off the Tortuga Banks. As the British squadron’s strength was limited by manning problems and lack of supplies, this information was essential to the commanders, who could then determine their course of action. See Davers to Admiralty, August 5 and November 24, 1745, PRO, Admiralty...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2015) 95 (2): 299–334.
Published: 01 May 2015
... of coercive structures instituted at the local level, and those wrested from thoroughfares and homes by patrols. While emphasizing the violence and unpredictability of rural recruitment, this section shows that the president and Congress granted a series of concessions to diverse interest groups...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (2): 283–330.
Published: 01 May 1989
... uncontrollable. The patrols, led by Oidor Hurtado de Mendoza and by the fiscal Cistué, were showered with stones and forced to retreat. Both men reported that they gave orders to fire on the crowd, but were disregarded and deserted by their men. 61 Oidor Romualdo Navarro, accompanied by the Conde de Selva...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (3): 521–559.
Published: 01 August 2003
... precisely because they were not professionals. The magistrate handpicked local peasants to serve in his rural patrols. In theory, municipal police received a small annual stipend; in practice, they were paid per head for each fugitive captured. In Diriomo, where rich peasants regularly collaborated...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1980) 60 (4): 643–671.
Published: 01 November 1980
... interior room, many taverns had a second, sometimes secret, entrance to the bar, either through an adjoining store or from a dimly lit alley. For further protection, vinateros often hired someone to watch for police patrols. 39 Alcoholic beverages were legally sold outside the pulquerías...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2015) 95 (3): 427–458.
Published: 01 August 2015
.... Police patrols received the summary power to destroy any entrudo laranjas that they found and were to bring offenders before justices of the peace. 81 On the eve of 1832's entrudo, Sacramento parish's acting justice of the peace publicized this ban on the “barbarous game” and hoped that citizens would...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (2): 229–256.
Published: 01 May 1970
... to the Americans came to an end, and public order was marred only by random acts of violence by Mexicans or occupation troops. With the return of public order the ayuntamiento achieved a major objective. An urban police force working in concert with the American military police once more patrolled the city...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (2): 321.
Published: 01 May 1993
... is thus not about Menéndez’ career as a captain general of the Armada de la Guardia de las Indias, the first royal fleet built to patrol the Caribbean and provide escorts for the convoys. Copyright 1993 by Duke University Press 1993 Menéndez: Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, Captain General...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (4): 694–695.
Published: 01 November 1990
.... As in the West Indies, secondary ports were left to their own resources. Naval forces available to the viceroy, however, were frequently divided between patrolling for interlopers and escorting silver shipments from Callao to Panama. Accordingly, once foreigners made it to the South Sea, they were able to roam...