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occupation

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2004) 84 (1): 153–154.
Published: 01 February 2004
...Paul Dosal Taking Haiti: Military Occupation and the Culture of U.S. Imperialism,1915-1940. By mary a. renda. Gender and American Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001. Photographs. Illustrations. Maps. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xvii, 440 pp. Cloth, $49.95. Paper...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2012) 92 (2): 376–378.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Robin Moore A Cultural History of Cuba during the U.S. Occupation, 1898 – 1902 . By Utset Marial Iglesias . Translated by Davidson Russ . Chapel Hill, NC : University of North Carolina Press , 2011 . Illustrations. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xi, 202 pp. Paper , $26.95...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 757–758.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Robert Whitney Empire's Guestworkers: Haitian Migrants in Cuba during the Age of US Occupation . By Matthew Casey . Afro-Latin America . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2017 . Photographs. Maps. Figures. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xii, 317 pp. Paper , $25.95...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 714–715.
Published: 01 November 2014
...Thomas Schoonover The Invaded: How Latin Americans and Their Allies Fought and Ended US Occupations . By Mcpherson Alan . Oxford : Oxford University Press , 2014 . Photographs. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. x, 393 pp. Cloth , $45.00 . Copyright © 2014 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 269–297.
Published: 01 May 2015
... of an expanding United States — and how this expansion gradually militarized diplomacy. Paternalist discourse and rapid economic change perpetuated internal strife, eventually contributing to bloody civil war and outright US military occupation (1916–1924). This article explores the development of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 445–468.
Published: 01 August 2011
... establish a creole scientific sovereignty during the late Spanish Empire, the institute brought together a dynamic research team and collaborated with leading international figures in microbiology. The second Cuban War of Independence interrupted the institute's research momentum and the US occupation...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 362–364.
Published: 01 May 2017
... imposition and loss of sovereignty” (p. 26). This tension continued into the twentieth century, shaping the occupation. The book documents the years prior to the occupation, when US military muscle, applied by naval officers, propped up an unpopular Dominican president and took over Dominican ports and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 140–142.
Published: 01 February 2019
... University Press 2019 Andrew K. Frank's monograph is a remarkable study of the five eras of human occupation of the Miami River's north bank before the 1896 inception of the city of Miami. The book's main goal, as the author himself states, is to provide the city “with a sense of its history that has...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 686–687.
Published: 01 November 2015
... cultural significance of the border and the othering of Haitians, and everyday social interactions among nonelite Haitians and Dominicans. It involves investigating the intersections of race, class, culture, nation, and region at specific historical moments, the legacies of the Haitian occupation (1822...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 154–156.
Published: 01 February 2019
... base of hills near spring-fed streams and good pasture, benefited from the changes in routes. The site developed over seven distinct construction phases. The earliest phases have little evidence for occupation, but in the third phase seven circular buildings were constructed. One of these was larger...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 751–753.
Published: 01 November 2016
... comparable to Weimar Germany in that military stalemate, decisive foreign intervention to determine a final outcome, postwar occupation and restricted sovereignty, constant political instability, and efforts to construct republican politics in their midst were characteristic of the two political experiments...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 335–337.
Published: 01 May 2017
... research in Sonora. Chapter 4 is dedicated exclusively to presenting research on the Late Paleoindian occupation in Sonora and gives a very detailed description of ten sites corresponding to this period of time, including the Fin del Mundo site. Of especial interest is the description of the El Bajío...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 178–180.
Published: 01 February 2015
... revolvers; and the figure of the tíguere , the sharp-witted, social-climbing, womanizing man on the make who some say Trujillo personified best but who long predated him. Even the “emasculating” US occupation produced a genre of the Dominican tough guy, the Marine-baiting gavilleros . Trujillo may have...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 712–714.
Published: 01 November 2015
... whitens,” or that either social position or education and occupational attainment causes an individual to self-identify and to be identified as white, is belied by data from Colombia indicating that individuals who regard themselves as mulattoes have, on average, higher educational and occupational...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2000) 80 (4): 913–942.
Published: 01 November 2000
... population, our examination of the population census data shows that the free colored, except at the elite level, were found in all the occupations practiced by their contemporary white neighbors and had much the same social, occupational, and demographic...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2007) 87 (2): 219–220.
Published: 01 May 2007
... useful information on variations in space utilization, household size and composition, urban den- sity, and the changing patterns of occupation of residential space. It also records information on Lima’s population by gender, education, religion, occupation, place of residence, place of origin...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 521–523.
Published: 01 August 2015
...  — including gender, occupation, honor, religion, and birth — that were key to defining status and identity. Rappaport treats casta nomenclature such as mestizo as the outcome of highly variable processes of identification rather than the signifiers of discrete and well-defined demographic subsets. By doing so...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 165–167.
Published: 01 February 2019
...: liberal uprisings in Seville and Valencia during the French occupation; clerics' role in an emergent public sphere of print media and political sociability; the place of religion, race, and gender in discussions of citizenship; and shifts in collective identities in Mexico between 1810 and 1823. These...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 177–178.
Published: 01 February 2019
... and politics, relies on the census data of 1845 and 1890 and focuses on Tehuantepec and Juchitán. Reina demonstrates the transformations in occupations and the burgeoning urban landscape. The author's discussion of the assault by neoliberal reforms on the agricultural and fishing occupations of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 524–526.
Published: 01 August 2018
..., Eller adopts a nomenclature that renames certain periods and places. The term chosen for the period from February 1822 to February 1844 is “Unification,” replacing the designation “Haitian occupation,” which does not appear here; 1844 is the beginning of “Separation,” lasting until 1861. Only after the...