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nunnery

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (1): 1–37.
Published: 01 February 2005
... reforms of the 1760s are the most famous of the eighteenthcentury attempts to transform New Spain’s convents. Although they have been treated as a particularly vivid example of conflict in the nunneries, as a window into the worldliness within the convents that reflected the values and lifestyles...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1966) 46 (4): 371–393.
Published: 01 November 1966
... of independence, and by subsequent expropriations during the republican period. Less numerous than monasteries, nunneries played an interesting and important role in the economic life of the viceroyalty. In the first two centuries of colonial life convents acquired and received land and other property, which...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1974) 54 (2): 209–232.
Published: 01 May 1974
... to the Nunnery, was the owner of a sugar mill in the Recôncavo. 26 Russell-Wood, Fidalgos , pp. 120-121. 25 The Pires de Carvalho family network illustrates well both the tendency of prominent plantation families to place several generations of women in the Destêrro and to intermarry with members...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (2): 246–256.
Published: 01 May 1965
... Señora Rayón had paid the Nunnery $25 a month for the part of the house she rented; the whole house yielded the corporation $37 a month. 26 Expediente relativo a las mejoras y arrendamiento de la casa no. 3 de la calle de Santa Teresa la antigua, perteneciente al convento del mismo nombre, AGN...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (2): 376–387.
Published: 01 May 1973
....) in “The Feminine Orders in Colonial Mexico: Their Economic and Social Role in the Eighteenth Century” concluded that as financial units the nunneries not only reflected the trends of the economy in general but also influenced them. They experienced the same administrative difficulties in the 17th century as other...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (1): 27–34.
Published: 01 February 1973
... owned large haciendas, sugar or flour mills, ranches and smaller plots of land. Others, such as nunneries and many confraternities, had invested largely in urban real estate. 5 In all instances, much capital had been diverted towards lending purposes, since this type of investment, if efficiently...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (3): 403–404.
Published: 01 August 1967
... and even the least prestigious archbishopric at La Plata. The old thesis of peninsular dominance of high offices is once more demolished. From many interesting sketches of turbulence in the monasteries, nunneries, and bishops’ palaces we know the colonial period was not a prolonged slumber. Father...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (3): 517–518.
Published: 01 August 2009
... desirable for the daughters of the elite. Elites increasingly viewed convents as schools rather than solely as protectors of female honor, as males increased their authority over them, and as regulars lost out to seculars. One would also like to see a sequel that takes the story of Cuba’s nunneries up...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (4): 796–797.
Published: 01 November 1984
... that seems to exert the most fascination on both historians is that of women in convents, and the special world of the brides of Christ. Martin devotes at least one quarter of his book to colonial nunneries; and while Sister Imelda Cano Roldán officially allocates only one chapter to convents, it is one...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (3): 557–558.
Published: 01 August 2012
... and the icons of the Virgins of Guadalupe and Remedios. Whereas the Cristo emerged from an indigenous community and landed in a nunnery in Mexico City, Guadalupe and Remedios appealed to a broad segment of the population. Taylor makes clear that the attribution of specific “political” affiliations...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (3): 591–592.
Published: 01 August 2007
... nurses, and artisans — routinely performed the everyday work of rearing the city’s children. Premo suggests that families who did not conform to the prescriptive model tended to experience the brunt of legal intervention into domestic matters. She also describes how the city’s nunneries and foundling...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (2): 362–364.
Published: 01 May 1968
... de Comercio de Guatemala, 1793-1871 (Chapel Hill, 1966). The Robertson Memorial Prize to Asunción Lavrin, for “The Role of the Nunneries in the Economy of New Spain in the Eighteenth Century,” in HAHR (November 1966); Honorable Mention to Fred rick B. Pike for “Heresy, Real and Alleged, in Peru...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (4): 707–733.
Published: 01 November 1983
.... 297. Michael Costeloe, “A Capellanía in Mexico, 1665-1799: A Case History,” The Catholic Historical Review , 62 (Oct. 1976), 616-617. 33 Asunción Lavrin, “The Role of the Nunneries in the Economy of New Spain in the Eighteenth Century,” HAHR , 46 (Nov. 1966), 377. 34 Arcila Farías et...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (3): 421–437.
Published: 01 August 1968
... possessors were charged with ecclesiastical service in cathedral, parish, and nunnery churches. A decree two years later 37 extended this exemption for as long as the chaplain performed these services. All other chaplaincies were to be disentailed or redeemed within eight days, after which the government...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (2): 287–323.
Published: 01 May 1975
..., 1969). 58 Asunción Lavrin, “The Role of the Nunneries in the Economy of New Spain in the Eighteenth Century,” HAHR , 46:4 (Nov. 1966), 371-393, and “La riqueza de los conventos de monjas en Nueva España: Estructura y evolución durante el siglo XVIII,” Cahiers des Amériques Latines, 8 (1973...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (3): 415–439.
Published: 01 August 1973
... vols., Salvador da Bahia, 1946), III, 90, II, 89, passim. 8 Susan Soeiro, “Flagellants and Financiers: The Nunnery in Bahia, 1677-1800,” paper presented at the American Historical Association Convention, New Orleans, Louisiana, December, 1972, pp. 12-13 notes 37, 38, 13, and 40; Russell-Wood, pp...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2001) 81 (3-4): 449–490.
Published: 01 August 2001
... en la historia de México , ed. Carmen Ramos Escandón et al. (Mexico City: El Colegio de México, 1987), 189; and Julia Tuñon Pablos, Mujeres en México: Una historia olvidada (Mexico City: Planeta, 1987). For studies of religious women, see Lavrin, “Ecclesiastical Reform of Nunneries in New Spain...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (2): 183–216.
Published: 01 May 1973
..., “Haciendas en la Sabana.” 103 Costeloe, Church Wealth . In the eighteenth century “all legal disguises for the interest-bearing loan were put aside. Members of the Church became openly engaged in the business of lending money.” Asunción Lavrin, “The Role of the Nunneries in the Economy of New Spain...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1998) 78 (1): 5–44.
Published: 01 February 1998
..., daughters of Spaniards like himself and Andean women. 3 Writing to Francisca de Jesús in 1560, the corregidor of Cuzco, Juan Polo de Ondegardo, gives an expanded account of the motives behind these founding acts. He begins by linking the nunnery directly to the fight for Peru: since so many Spaniards had...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (3): 479–503.
Published: 01 August 1977
... Francisco Morales, Ethnic and Social Background of the Franciscan Friars in Seventeenth Century Mexico (Washington, 1973), p. 101, states that 111 parents were artisans, 80 in government service, and 77, merchants. 71 Asunción Lavrin, “The Role of the Nunneries in the Economy of New Spain...