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narvaez

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1949) 29 (1): 150–156.
Published: 01 February 1949
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2001) 81 (2): 355–359.
Published: 01 May 2001
...Patricia Galloway This work by Rolena Adorno and Patrick Pautz is not just a new edition of the 1542 first-published account of the Narváez expedition by Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca; it is a historiographical tour de force, a model for the kind of detailed textual criticism that is made possible...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (3): 511–512.
Published: 01 August 2009
... on the travails of Cabeza de Vaca and the Narvaéz calamity. Pánfilo de Narvaéz and a company of over 300 men left to explore the area around the Rio de las Palmas in 1528. Unfortunately, their pilot, Diego Miruelo, didn’t know where he was going and instead of landing on the east coast of Mexico, they disembarked...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (1): 135–136.
Published: 01 February 2005
... Conquest and exploration in the Americas. A unique account of disaster and struggle for survival, the text provides singular ethnographic information on the several North American indigenous tribes between Florida and northern Mexico among whom the members of the Pánfilo de Narváez expedition lived...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (2): 259–283.
Published: 01 May 1994
... the title of conquistador, not even the devoted Tlaxcaltecos. The only exception is Diego de Valbuena, an Indian from Cuba, who came to New Spain with 40 men of his own, probably after Narváez’ expedition, to participate in the conquest of Mexico City. 73 Many of the conquistadores had occupations...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1995) 75 (2): 149–183.
Published: 01 May 1995
.... The journey from Vera Cruz to Tenochtitlan, between August and November 1519, makes up the first act. The events during the Spaniards’ stay in Tenochtitlan, from November 1519 to May 1520, form the second. The arrival of the Narváez expedition and the ensuing disaster of the Noche Triste form the third...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (3): 467–481.
Published: 01 August 1970
...Allan J. Kuethe 23 Francisco Silvestre, Descripción del reyno de Santa Fe de Bogotá, escrita en 1789 , Biblioteca Popular de Cultura Colombiana, CXXI (Bogotá, 1950), 60; Antonio de Narváez y la Torre, “Relación, o informe de la provincia de Santa Marta, y Riohacha. . .,” Escritos de dos...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (4): 816–817.
Published: 01 November 1969
... jurisdiction. Unfortunately, serious errors of fact or omission plague the compiler’s introduction. Estevanico was a member of Pánfilo de Narváez’ group, not an expedition leader (p. xii). The black rebellion was not the cause of Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón’s failure (p. xiii). Describing Florida correctly...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (4): 549–551.
Published: 01 November 1963
...,” by Fuentes y Guzmán, was the first medical botany of Guatemala written by a Guatemalan’ It has excellent descriptions of many plant drugs still used by the curanderos to-day. The second part describes viruela—supposedly smallpox—introduced into Mexico by a Negro in the troops of Pánfilo Narváez, 1520...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (2): 297–299.
Published: 01 May 1997
... Narváez report their excavations. Both masterfully condense large bodies of data while maintaining easy stratigraphic reference. Sandweiss’ summary of environment and previous research is impressively thorough. Two important aspects of Andean cosmology are omitted, however, highlighting a current stress...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (3): 586–588.
Published: 01 August 2000
... . Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press 2000 When Pánfilo de Narváez decided upon an interior exploration during his ill-fated expedition to Florida in 1528, another member of the crew, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, expressed serious doubts. They were in a land they knew nothing about, he argued...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (3): 561–562.
Published: 01 August 2011
... such as Matilde Narváez, major advocate of the Virgin of Ixpantepec, interpreted this Marian apparition as a sign of an impending divine punishment for the modern error of secularism. Although Gillow’s successor, José Núñez, refused to officially recognize this devotion, Narváez and her supporters perceived...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (1): 59–74.
Published: 01 February 1968
... necessarily colored the encounter with Narváez and related incidents. These motivations explain some of the omissions in his dispatches. Wishing to have credit accrue to himself in order to establish firmly his own leadership, he mentioned few of his soldiers (a defect which Díaz hoped to remedy). Cortés also...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (3): 468–469.
Published: 01 August 1972
... States and Canada. Not all, but a major part of the book is devoted to Spanish expeditions which originated in Europe, the Caribbean, or New Spain: Narváez, Cabeza de Vaca, Coronado, Soto, Cabrillo, Ayllón, Ponce de León, Menéndez de Avilés, Gómez, Luna y Arellano and many more. It was a century...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1986) 66 (3): 592–593.
Published: 01 August 1986
... in the region. Although he adduces much detail and provides a good review of sources, little new is added to the standard narratives of the conquests of Mexico, Yucatan, or of the epic journeys of the Narváez expedition. Treatment of the attempted conquests of Florida by Hernando de Soto and Pedro Menéndez de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (1): 149–150.
Published: 01 February 1993
..., and influence they added a hierarchy based on time of arrival. Leading the way were the “first conquerors,” those with Cortés at Cozumel and Veracruz; then the conquerors, those present at the fall of Tenochtitlán (mostly Narváez veterans); pobladores antiguos , veterans of the Indies who moved to Mexico...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1976) 56 (2): 315–317.
Published: 01 May 1976
... perceptions of their place within Spanish society. Jealous of their first claims (seeing even the men of Narváez as latecomers), they were bitterly resentful of the lawyers who arrived to circumscribe their status and income. Their experiences of the conquest, however bloody, curiously gave them a special...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (1): 147–148.
Published: 01 February 2016
..., the connections between Florida and the Caribbean—which served as the base for the expeditions of Ponce de León and Pánfilo de Narváez (which resulted in the long years that Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca and his companions spent in the Southeast and Texas), Hernando de Soto, and others—and the history of the Indians...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (3): 527–528.
Published: 01 August 2022
... the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. In so doing Borchard “moves Appalachia from the realm of regional American history into the broader world of Atlantic and global history where it belongs” (p. 12). The myth of Appalachia, or Apalache, begins in the wake of Pánfilo de Narváez's disastrous attempt...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (3): 419–421.
Published: 01 August 1963
... of politically minded intellectuals, the most important of whom were probably Emilio Castelar and Francisco Pi y Margall. Both men were leaders of the Democrats, who during the 1850’s opposed the dictatorships of Narváez and O’Donnell, and who in the 1860’s were tending to become republicans on grounds...