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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (1): 167–168.
Published: 01 February 2018
...Deborah Jakubs Musicians in Transit: Argentina and the Globalization of Popular Music . By Karush Matthew B. . Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2017 . Photographs. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xi, 268 pp. Paper , $24.95 . Copyright © 2018 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (4): 761–763.
Published: 01 November 1996
...Robin Moore My Music Is My Flag: Puerto Rican Musicians and Their New York Communities, 1917-1940 . By Glasser Ruth . Berkeley : University of California Press , 1995 . Photographs. Map. Notes. Bibliography . xxiv , 253 pp. Cloth . $30.00 . Copyright 1996 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1986) 66 (2): 439.
Published: 01 May 1986
... and African-derived music. Copyright 1986 by Duke University Press 1986 More Than Drumming: Essays on African and Afro-Latin American Music and Musicians . Edited by Jackson Irene V. . Westport, CT : Greenwood Press , 1985 . Illustrations. Tables. Index . Pp. xv , 207 . Cloth. $35.00 . ...
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Figure 3 Malandro-musicians. From left to right: Paulo da Portela, Heitor dos Prazeres, unidentified, Alcebíades Barcellos (Bide), Armando Marçal. Acervo da Família Heitor dos Prazeres (The Heitor dos Prazeres Family Archive). More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (4): 591–625.
Published: 01 November 2010
...Figure 3 Malandro-musicians. From left to right: Paulo da Portela, Heitor dos Prazeres, unidentified, Alcebíades Barcellos (Bide), Armando Marçal. Acervo da Família Heitor dos Prazeres (The Heitor dos Prazeres Family Archive). ...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (1): 77–105.
Published: 01 February 2014
... of creative grassroots musicians. Using data from the National Folkloric Survey of 1942, I explore the everyday music practices of popular sectors in different areas of the country and the challenge that these practices posed to elite definitions of popular music. In order to analyze the role of music...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (4): 732–733.
Published: 01 November 2017
... , $65.00 . Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 Eighteenth-century Mexico City was marked by tension and negotiation as cathedral musicians adapted to social, economic, and aesthetic transformations in order to negotiate their positions in society. “Playing in the cathedral” refers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (2): 249–258.
Published: 01 May 2016
... growing. It's like I've made it.” 8 The portraits that emerge—ambitious black calouros, intent on using music as a way to improve their financial and social standing—contrast sharply with the standard depiction of black musicians in Brazil and elsewhere. In the United States, Ron Radano writes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (3): 584–586.
Published: 01 August 2003
...Bryan McCann The Buena Vista Social Club phenomenon of the late 1990s—which rescued from obscurity a group of aged Cuban musicians and brought them to Carnegie Hall and beyond in the company of a globetrotting North American guitarist and a German filmmaker with a romantic fondness for Old...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (2): 350–351.
Published: 01 May 2008
... that globalization in music is not a recent phenomenon — “the current fixation on globalization is nothing new to musicians” (p. 57) — he does not engage in a meaningful discussion of globalization as an economic and corporate-driven process that leads to social inequalities. Rather, Fernández insists...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (3): 526–527.
Published: 01 August 2009
... by indigenous musicians, whose repertory included European polyphony as well as pieces related to Andean tradition. Parish musicians usually belonged to these confraternities. Following pre-Hispanic traditions, they received part of their salary not in cash but in kind and sometimes worked for free as a form...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (2): 330–332.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Jack A. Draper, III These limitations aside, Making Samba provides a very rich picture of popular music and the experience of black musicians in Rio between the Empire and the 1950s while also addressing some musicians' memories as recounted in interviews from later decades. The work should...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (3): 559–560.
Published: 01 August 2018
... the musicians identified with the Nueva Canción developed their work. She defines the Nueva Canción in the preface as “poetic, combative, lyrical, militant, romantic, committed, idealistic, inspirational, and hauntingly beautiful” (p. xvii). Her main objective is to emphasize the moment in which the Nueva...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (2): 338–340.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Kristin Dutcher Mann The variety in this volume's essays, as well as the conversations with musicians, will appeal particularly to students of Hispanic and cultural studies as well as those in the fields of political science, sociology, history, and music. Unlike many anthologies about...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (4): 681–706.
Published: 01 November 2006
... to focus on indigenous, rather than criollo, popular music; he summoned Mexican musicians to adopt indigenous music as their own in order to be able to create individual works (we assume of “true” Mexican character). He tacitly recognized that indigenismo in music would be a construction, as it would have...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (4): 727–728.
Published: 01 November 2013
... the changing role of these Carnival groups in 1870 – 1950, while his fourth expands on this theme for the period from 1950 to 2010. Initially comparsas consisted of Afro-Uruguayan musicians and dancers. As Carnival took on a more formal role in the late nineteenth century and the participation of upper...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (1): 128.
Published: 01 February 1993
... three decades, especially since the appearance of Bossa Nova in the 1960s, when composers and singers such as Antônio Carlos Jobim and João Gilberto were “discovered” by U.S. musicians such as Charlie Byrd, Herbie Mann, and Stan Getz. The cross-fertilization of musical styles engendered at that time has...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (2): 389–390.
Published: 01 May 2000
... in samba’s exaltation. Transformations in politics, industry and, most importantly, within the world of samba itself—the community defined by the genre’s composers, musicians and producers—were also fundamental. The author mentions these processes and gives a glimpse of their workings, but offers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (3): 554–555.
Published: 01 August 2004
.... Cloth, $65.00 . Paper, $24.95 . Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press 2004 The musical genre known as salsa emerged from the experimentations of Puerto Rican and Cuban musicians in East Harlem in the late 1960s and thus could plausibly be said to have its home in New York, or at more...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (1): 168–170.
Published: 01 February 2022
... meanings inside Panama but does not resonate abroad. One interview illustrates this point: when popular musicians Samy and Sandra Sandoval performed on the widely watched show Sábado Gigante , the host asked them which kind of music they played. When they answered “música típica,” the response...