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mule

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Published: 01 November 2005
Figure 3 “Mule Driver” (Guerrero, Imágenes del Ecuador , 67). Figure 3. “Mule Driver” (Guerrero, Imágenes del Ecuador, 67). More
Image
Published: 01 August 2017
Figure 1. The Interior of a Store in the Principal Street of Bogotá with Mule Drivers Purchasing (ca. 1840), by Joseph Brown (signed “J. Brown pinx,” from an original by J. M. Groot). Courtesy of the Royal Geographical Society. Figure 1. The Interior of a Store in the Principal Street More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (2): 388–389.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Robert Gay Women Drug Traffickers: Mules, Bosses, and Organized Crime . By Carey Elaine . Diálogos . Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press , 2014 . Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiii, 295 pp. Paper , $29.95 . Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (4): 762–764.
Published: 01 November 2012
... mules. The book is another demonstration as to how the Andes shape Chilean history as well as that of western Argentina. To the extent that pre-railway animal-based transport limits any society, mountains add to the difficulty of commercial exchange. Chile’s mountains, both the coastal...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (4): 749–751.
Published: 01 November 1999
... (the royal tobacco monopoly) by mule train at the end of the eighteenth century in New Spain. The author’s goal is to demonstrate that at the end of the colonial period, New Spain comprised a set of regions that were highly articulated through a dependable and well-established system of land transportation...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (1): 30–51.
Published: 01 February 1970
... needed reasonable security on a dangerous frontier. 32 Hence the development of the large Mexican carro , often drawn by huge teams of mules. 73 Woodrow W. Borah, New Spain’s Century of Depression (Berkeley, 1951), 24, 27-33. 74 Chevalier, Land and Society , 24-25, 48-49, 63-64, 151...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (3): 474–476.
Published: 01 August 1978
... than a decade to capture traffic from the carts and mule trains. These older forms of transportation proved themselves remarkably resistant to rail competition. Yet none of these difficulties suggest that there was a lack of traffic to carry. Allan Campbell, the engineer who investigated firsthand...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (2): 309.
Published: 01 May 1967
... the translator admits to the awkwardness of the style of the original, its prolixity, and its superior interest in “mules and mudholes.” To this I would add that the content is vague and sheds little or no light on the period; the details are seldom germane (except regarding mules); its jokes and ventures...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (1): 1–31.
Published: 01 February 1994
... competition among merchants for control of the silver trade. Some Lima merchants stood to lose business under these new arrangements. The purchase of silver in the mining centers, its trade for consumer goods, and its transport via mule trains to the ports fostered an internal circulation process...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (1): 179–180.
Published: 01 February 2003
... in the eighteenth century the booming mule trade that supplied Upper and Lower Peru (the mules raised in the southern provinces were fattened in Salta before they were sent to their final destination) created an important real-estate market in the province. Thus, by the second half of the eighteenth century most...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1980) 60 (4): 571–592.
Published: 01 November 1980
... 1765 to create a commercial infrastructure including roads, bridges, mule shelters, port facilities, a mint, and a municipal market which would make an export trade through Santos feasible. This story is important for an understanding of what I believe was a common basis of economic community...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1962) 42 (2): 217–231.
Published: 01 May 1962
... at Turbaco while waiting for the mules to be brought up, the arriero, (mule driver) came to inform us that the mules had been all embargoed for Genl. [José] Padilla, 3 who had arrived last night on his way to Bogotá. Having looked up the Intendant’s letter which announced my character and reqd. all...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (4): 613–632.
Published: 01 November 1977
..., the railroad was able to capitalize on the profitable trade carried on by carts and mules between the interior and Rosario. Opening the port to foreign ships allowed the slower methods of carriage to initiate the integration of the economy of the interior with that of the littoral and, ultimately, the world...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (1): 21–49.
Published: 01 February 1985
... was the planta (the combination of buildings, equipment, and legal rights attached to the estate). The latter was worth 800 pesos, or 73 percent of the estancia’s total value. The livestock and apicultural properties included 14 head of cattle, 10 horses, 2 mules, and 177 apiaries; these were valued at 70, 50...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (2): 319.
Published: 01 May 1979
... in considerable detail all the relevant aspects of the subject. He covers not only cattle, but horse, mule, and sheep raising, stressing production and internal trade patterns. Using the records of payment of alcabala, he has reconstructed reliable figures for those variables. Numerous tables and graphs convey...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (3): 531–538.
Published: 01 August 1989
... exchange. The freight industry in New Spain, which used thousands of mules carrying goods across the country, was a significant (though little-studied branch) of the economy. None of which is to deny that corn markets were highly localized. In effect, it cost one real a day for a mule to carry a fanega...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (4): 757–759.
Published: 01 November 1969
... planned, the City of Kings in 1786 was divided into four sections, totaling 350 streets, 8222 houses, and thirty-three barrios. Its greatest problems were beggars, dust from unpaved streets and dried dung of animals, and the traffic jams created by horse-drawn coaches, mule-drawn calesas , and flocks...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (4): 696–698.
Published: 01 November 2013
... Guinea, the Gold Coast, and West Africa; cacao, tobacco, hides, and mules from Tierra Firme; sugar, coffee, cotton, and indigo from the islands of the British, French, and Danish Caribbean; and dyewood from Central America. Willemstad was a rich, sprawling cosmopolitan port in which a Senegambian...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 361–391.
Published: 01 August 2008
..., political, and social commerce from the region could travel 5,000 kilometers through the dangerous waters of the Straits of Magellan or cross a distance of 1,500 kilometers by land with carts and mules. Naturally, the latter route was preferred for the transportation of both people and goods between...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (4): 681–683.
Published: 01 November 2005
... successful. Entre Ríos, in particular, took advantage of the Anglo-French blockade (1845–48) to develop a profitable trade with Brazil, Paraguay, and Europe. Salta and Jujuy suffered a decline in the mule trade but compensated with new connections to Pacific ports. Córdoba continued to send woolens to Buenos...