1-20 of 62 Search Results for

mnr

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (1): 209.
Published: 01 February 1969
...Leonard Cardenas, Jr. Military Intervention in Bolivia: The Overthrow of Paz Estenssoro and the MNR . By Brill William H. . Washington , 1967 . Institute for the Comparative Study of Political Systems . Political Studies Series, 3 . Notes. Bibliography . Pp. i , 68 . Paper...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (4): 750–751.
Published: 01 November 1979
...G. Earl Sanders The Legacy of Populism in Bolivia: From the MNR to Military Rule . By Mitchell Christopher . New York , 1977 . Praeger Publishers . Map. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index . Pp. xiii , 167 . Cloth . Copyright 1979 by Duke University Press 1979 The great...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (1): 93–122.
Published: 01 February 2020
... Revolucionario (MNR) state's rightward turn, local elites had regrouped to challenge revolutionary change. Meanwhile, José Rojas—a powerful peasant leader and key MNR ally—faced a crucial crossroads. Repeatedly tapped by state authorities to pacify San Pedro de Buena Vista, Rojas vacillated between asserting...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (1): 95–129.
Published: 01 February 2017
...Kevin A. Young Abstract After the 1952 Bolivian Revolution, oil assumed an increasingly important role in Bolivia's economy and popular consciousness. Oil nationalists were deeply divided, however. While the Movimiento Nacionalista Revolucionario (MNR) regime sought economic modernization, labor...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (1): 26–54.
Published: 01 February 1972
.... Author’s translation. See also Klein, Parties and Political Change . . ., p. 372, and Charles H. Weston, Jr., “An Ideology of Modernization: The Case of the Bolivian MNR,” Journal of Inter-American Studies , 10:1 (January 1968) p. 101. 68 Friedrich Katz called the author’s attention to two...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1982) 62 (4): 607–628.
Published: 01 November 1982
... of working with campesinos closely surrounding the towns and the city of Cochabamba, those who have been least happy with Rojas’ forceful and sometimes brutal methods. He has the support of many of the townspeople of Cochabamba. 25 One of the townspeople who did not support Veizaga was the MNR...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1987) 67 (3): 541–542.
Published: 01 August 1987
... public opinion. The author tests this hypothesis in a study of the newspapers associated with the Movimiento Nacional Revolucionario (MNR), the party that led the 1952 uprising in Bolivia that resulted in one of the few genuine social revolutions in Latin America. Unfortunately, this interesting attempt...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (2): 238–259.
Published: 01 May 1978
... The Falange, with its constituency almost exclusively limited to the nation’s towns and cities, mounted numerous revolts against the MNR regime. For a brief discussion of the Falange, see Patch, “The Bolivian Falange,” American Universities Field Staff (May 14, 1959); for the reported arrest of three...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (2): 259–296.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of the Revolutionary Nationalist Movement (MNR) from comunario leaders during the first two years of the 1952 revolution. In 1952 there were still independent Indian communities in Bolivia whose members identified themselves as comunarios. Former Indian comunarios who had lost their lands to latifundio expansion...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (1): 206–207.
Published: 01 February 2019
... an excellent explanation of how economic ideas motivated Bolivian popular sectors, MNR leaders, and US policymakers and of how the agendas of these three groups determined the course of Bolivian history. Popular pressure for resource nationalism put limits on what MNR and post-MNR governments could do...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (3): 577–578.
Published: 01 August 2022
... revolution, which was led by the Revolutionary Nationalist Movement (MNR). Carmen Soliz's extensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of land tenure in three provinces at the core of Bolivia's hacienda system explains not only the mechanics and shape of land reform but also its profound effects...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (4): 773–774.
Published: 01 November 2007
... decades, the Movimiento Nacionalist Revolucionaria (MNR), produce some exaggeration and a couple of surprising omissions. The author vigorously defends the MNR’s commitment to reform on the eve of the 1952 National Revolution. Alexander notes that some scholars have argued that “the MNR had not originally...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2001) 81 (2): 436–438.
Published: 01 May 2001
... and radicalism across the republics in the 1930s. By far the most fascinating period of U.S.-Bolivian relations, the Movimiento Nacionalista Revolucionaria (MNR) years started with the promise of structural reform in 1952, but ended with a dubious record of military interference in the political arena...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (4): 806–807.
Published: 01 November 1970
... University Press 1970 The central insight of this slender, fact-studded, and generally excellent volume is that the Movimiento Nacionalista Revolucionaria (MNR) was not revolutionary at all in financial policy during its tenure of power from 1952 to 1964. Rather, the MNR continued the policies actually...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (3): 475.
Published: 01 August 1963
...Charles W. Arnade This is a collection of speeches of the author who is a member of the left wing of the Bolivian MNR. Most of these speeches were made in the Bolivian legislature in the late 1950’s. It is an interesting if not valuable book because it defines clearly the thinking...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (1): 155–156.
Published: 01 February 1972
.... The book has an introduction entitled “A Frame of Analysis,” followed by three parts: a quick survey up to the end of the Chaco War; from 1936 until the 1952-MNR revolution; and the period of the MNR until the fall of Paz Estenssoro in 1964. Then there is a well presented chapter called “conclusions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (4): 746–748.
Published: 01 November 1978
... Revolucionario (MNR) seized power in April 1952. He starts out with the proposition that “the ideology of the Fourth International was widely accepted by those who had made the April revolution.” However, this was certainly not the case with Juan Lechín and Mario Torres of the Miners’ Federation, Germán Buitrón...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (4): 728–730.
Published: 01 November 2010
... raises important questions about the similarities of the MAS with the National Revolutionary Movement (MNR) of 1952. He argues that by recognizing that they are building on the past of the MNR, the MAS could avoid repeating some of the same mistakes. Whitehead hopes for a “constrained originality...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1988) 68 (3): 633–634.
Published: 01 August 1988
.... Langer seems not to have grasped this premise. For example, he takes me to task for the “distorted viewpoint” of relying exclusively on MNR newspapers for an analysis of tin magnate Simón I. Patiño, “hardly a complete or objective source.” Of course not. The object was to present the propaganda image...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (1): 150–151.
Published: 01 February 1978
... to the abrupt seizure of power by the MNR in Bolivia in April 1952. Initially distrustful, the American government soon performed an unusual about-face—actually unique for the time—and began a generous aid and assistance program in support of the revolutionary regime. Víctor Andrade served in various top...