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mercury

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1941) 21 (4): 627–628.
Published: 01 November 1941
...Arthur S. Aiton The Huancavelica Mercury Mine. A Contribution to the History of the Bourbon Renaissance in the Spanish Empire . By Whitaker Arthur Preston . ( Cambridge : Harvard University Press , 1941 . Pp. xiii , 150 . $2.00 .) Copyright 1941 by Duke University Press 1941 ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (3): 550–551.
Published: 01 August 2012
...Christian Brannstrom Robins combines archival work and reading of published primary materials, air pollution modeling, and knowledge of medical research on health effects of mercury exposure in a superb treatment of Andean colonial mining. He argues that genocidal policies encouraged...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (4): 669–702.
Published: 01 November 1999
... its publication, almost exclusively by Arthur P. Whitaker’s The Huancavelica Mercury Mine. 2 The past decade or so has witnessed a minor boom in “Huancavelica studies,” with a number of scholars greatly enhancing our understanding of the late colonial mines. 3 But there remains a clear...
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Published: 01 November 1999
Fig. 2: Calculated quinquennial mercury production at Huancavelica, 1700-1760 Fig. 2:. Calculated quinquennial mercury production at Huancavelica, 1700-1760 More
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Published: 01 November 1972
Graph I MERCURY PRODUCTION: Almaden and Huancavolica, 1570-1810 (annual averages in thousands of quintals) Sources: Kuss, Mémoire d’Almadén , pp. 149-150; Rivero y Ustáriz, Memoria sobre Huancavelica , pp. 154-157. (see note 51). Both sources provide aggregated production totals for unequal More
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Published: 01 November 1972
Graph III MERCURY CONSUMPTION: New Spain and Peru, 1560-1700 (five-year totals in thousands of quintals) Sources: Chaunu, Seville et l’Atlantique , VIII, 2:2, 1958-1978; Matilla Tascón, Almadén , pp. 234-235; Lohmann Villena , Huancavelica, pp. 452-455; Bakewell, Silver and Society , pp. 253 More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1980) 60 (3): 492–493.
Published: 01 August 1980
... thesis is that the financial and administrative ineptitude of Spanish government rather than technical problems (though these had their effect) was responsible for inadequate supply of mercury to Mexico in the seventeenth century. On the evidence presented this is certainly a persuasive argument...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (2): 315–316.
Published: 01 May 1981
... The leitmotiv role of mercury in the memoirs of New Spain’s viceroys reflects the vital connection between this product, essential to the refining of silver, and the economic development of the Spanish Empire. Antonia Heredia Herrera’s study concentrates on the administration of the product, a state monopoly...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (2): 338–340.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Indians northeast of Huamanga to reveal a local deposit of cinnabar, or llimpi —a scarlet ore that Andean elites collected as a ritual cosmetic but that when fired produces liquid mercury. Mercury is toxic but when amalgamated with other metals—like silver—allows the refining of lesser-quality ores...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (4): 545–579.
Published: 01 November 1972
...Graph I MERCURY PRODUCTION: Almaden and Huancavolica, 1570-1810 (annual averages in thousands of quintals) Sources: Kuss, Mémoire d’Almadén , pp. 149-150; Rivero y Ustáriz, Memoria sobre Huancavelica , pp. 154-157. (see note 51). Both sources provide aggregated production totals for unequal...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (3): 491–492.
Published: 01 August 1990
... Over the course of the eighteenth century, annual silver production in Mexico quadrupled, due in large part to cheaper and more abundant supplies of mercury, a key ingredient in the refining process. Nearly all mercury used by Mexicans during the eighteenth century came from Almadén, the royal...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (3): 558–559.
Published: 01 August 1985
... by the emergence into social and economic prominence of Huancavelica’s merchants in the mid-seventeenth century. He attributes this to the dwindling of the mercury miners’ previous economic strength. This decline resulted, so he proposes, from a shortage of forced labor, which in turn derived from the sixteenth...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (4): 665–681.
Published: 01 November 1970
.... More as an act of mercy to his debtors than to him, the Crown agreed to reduce his taxes from the tithe to a twentieth and to supply mercury at cost price, both concessions to last for ten years. 44 Anza was the third case of such exemptions, clear evidence that the mines of Zacatecas were regarded...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (4): 656–657.
Published: 01 November 1972
... following 1630. The causes of this slump were twofold. First, the Crown diverted Almadén mercury, the indispensable ingredient for amalgamation, from Mexico to Peru. Then as miners’ debts to the royal mercury monopoly increased, the Crown foreclosed and virtually bankrupted the industry. Zacatecas did...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (1): 181–182.
Published: 01 February 1979
..., Alberto Crespo, Josep Barriadas, and others. Introductory and concluding chapters on the general history of Potosí, divided at 1573, when mercury amalgamation was introduced there, are accompanied by a discussion of mercury mining at Huancavelica, and more detailed consideration of labor supply...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1995) 75 (2): 275–276.
Published: 01 May 1995
...), and reinstituted credit sales of mercury from the government monopoly just as production at the Huancavelica mercury mine began to rise again. Like their counterparts in Mexico, Potosí’s mining enterprises were vertically integrated operations. Except for their multifaceted dependence on the colonial state...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (1): 124–126.
Published: 01 February 1999
... trends in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, fraud, credit and exchange, technological changes, investment strategies, transport of mercury and bullion, the state monopoly over mercury, amalgamation versus smelting in the late eighteenth century, and labor in the mines. The author’s central...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (3): 569–571.
Published: 01 August 2016
... forced the viceroy to suspend mercury sales on credit from Huancavelica in 1804. Eight years later, the Huancavelica mine was closed and mercury was imported from Spain. The mercury business was deadly and dangerous in multiple ways. The wars of independence disrupted exports of precious metals. Even...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (3): 440–469.
Published: 01 August 1973
... to that of the Viceroyalty of New Spain (Mexico). The latter zone produced gross royal revenues of some 19.2 million pesos in 1789. 15 Mining taxes, mintage charges and mercury sales alone produced 4.6 million pesos in New Spain in 1789, compared to the only 1.1 million pesos produced from the same source...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (1): 25–43.
Published: 01 February 1975
... Registered Silver Production in Peru, 1771-1824 Figure I. Registered Silver Production in Peru, 1771-1824 Within the period 1777-1812, the fluctuation in silver registration from year to year was often due to difficulties associated with mercury supply and distribution and not to purely internal...
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