1-18 of 18 Search Results for

logwood

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (1): 113–136.
Published: 01 February 2000
... with the 1783 Treaty of Versailles and evacuate the Mosquitia in 1787, some 500 British settlers and 1,600 African slaves resided at Black River and a few other select points along the coast to Punta Gorda in southeastern Nicaragua. 28 Although many historians implicitly accept that logwood was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1946) 26 (4): 533–535.
Published: 01 November 1946
... the author ignores the fact that it was not until the third quarter of the seventeenth century that there was developed a satisfactory method of utilizing logwood so that it yielded a fast dye. The demand for logwood consequently increased rapidly, and it was this demand which tempted the ex...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1946) 26 (4): 532–533.
Published: 01 November 1946
... leading buccaneers. This is undoubtedly true; but the author ignores the fact that it was not until the third quarter of the seventeenth century that there was developed a satisfactory method of utilizing logwood so that it yielded a fast dye. The demand for logwood consequently increased rapidly, and it...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (1): 92–93.
Published: 01 February 1978
... an extended period its relations with the metropolis as well; land tenure practices that resulted in engrossment and monopolization of land by the local elite; a pattern of resource exploitation that began with logwood cutting, progressed to mahogany cutting, and tardily turned to agriculture; a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (3): 496–498.
Published: 01 August 2014
... day: imperial and international trade policy, taxation, and the key exports of logwood, mahogany, and their successors. The authors are generally critical of imperial failures to check the power of the forestry elite and to diversify exports, although they do not consider alternatives to export...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (2): 395–396.
Published: 01 May 2007
... was established in 1898 as a customhouse to collect taxes on exports of logwood ( Haematoxylum campechianum , or palo de tinte ), but logwood exports were quickly surpassed by chicle and copra, which were not so easy to control from Chetumal Bay. As a result, other small towns developed on the east...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (1): 136–137.
Published: 01 February 1968
... El Salvador and Guatemala, fostered a Pacific trade via the Horn that never involved Belize. Again, little analysis is made of the mahogany and logwood enterprise which remained the basis of the Belize economy. The descriptive information about British Honduras is a valuable contribution by...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1946) 26 (4): 535–537.
Published: 01 November 1946
... conduct (for which his favorite adjective is taimado) is rather too reminiscent of eighteenth-century pamphleteering. Certain­ ly British negotiators were often less than honest, but in such questions as their doubt of Spanish ability to supply logwood they were taking a defensible position and were not...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (4): 677–706.
Published: 01 November 1983
... were often sent to Jamaica or even England to be educated, and the alliance was kept lubricated by gifts of firearms, trinkets, and rum. 16 English cultivation of the Mosquitos was directly related to the need to protect the lucrative dyewood or logwood cutting industry that had developed in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (4): 622–623.
Published: 01 November 1964
... replaced by small Maya villages clustered around a ceremonial center. The power of the Tatich was so complete that he not only controlled his people but made treaties in the name of the Cross. Indeed, the British from Belize extended de facto recognition and freely traded guns and supplies for logwood...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (3): 381–419.
Published: 01 August 2014
... activities on the Belize River — and then later on the New River and Río Hondo to the north and the Sibun River to the south (see figures 1 and 3 ) 11  — had gradually expanded in the eighteenth century as the Atlantic world markets grew for first logwood and then mahogany. The Spanish never conceded...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (1): 31–59.
Published: 01 February 2019
... cutting timber on both sides of the Hondo River. 20 By 1863 Castillo had entered the business in sugar, and by 1869 the wealthy businessman had qualified for naturalization in Belize. At San Antonio, Castillo eventually owned most of the villages and surrounding milpa lands, leasing several logwood...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (3): 473–488.
Published: 01 August 1969
... the Spanish forces. Only once had he served in the Caribbean, as a squadron commander in the Armada de Barlovento during the spring of 1726. At that time he had received a reprimand for lack of boldness, because he had withdrawn from a proposed attack on the British logwood cutters near Belize. These...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (4): 544–566.
Published: 01 November 1965
...’s and reported: As a British settlement, this colony is not of so much importance on account of the specific advantages which it derives from the liberty of cutting logwood and mahogany . . . as from its being the natural entrepôt between Great Britain and the Central Republic. Thompson...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (4): 619–647.
Published: 01 November 2019
... of a significant population of people of African descent. It remains unclear exactly how frequently runaway African slaves from Spanish frontier colonies or British logwood settlements may have joined the Mosquitos, but several documents allude to a major influx after a shipwreck around 1640. Some...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (2): 233–256.
Published: 01 May 2020
... bound for Cape Catoche, where her crew intended to cut logwood. On board were two Mayas who had been abducted by English buccaneers near Campeche in the previous year. These men, along with all other crew members, were forced to accompany the French gang to the Mosquito Coast. 30 Such abductions were...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (3): 455–478.
Published: 01 August 1977
... harbor of Matanzas. His booty from the gold, silver, indigo, sugar, and logwood was 15,000,000 guilders, which yielded shareholders of the Dutch West India Company a gratifying dividend of fifty percent. 67 To restore some of these losses, Viceroy Cerralvo, only one year later, squeezed from colonists...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (4): 697–735.
Published: 01 November 1991