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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 763–765.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Elizabeth O'Brien Revolutionary Ideology and Political Destiny in Mexico, 1928–1934: Lázaro Cárdenas and Adalberto Tejeda . By Eitan Ginzberg . Eastbourne, UK : Sussex Academic Press , 2015 . Photographs. Maps. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 276 pp. Paper , $39.95 . Copyright...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 386–388.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Lisa Pinley Covert Creating Pátzcuaro, Creating Mexico: Art, Tourism, and Nation Building under Lázaro Cárdenas . By Jennifer Jolly . Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture . Austin : University of Texas Press , 2018 . Photographs. Maps...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 577–578.
Published: 01 August 2012
...Thomas Rath Populism in Twentieth Century Mexico: The Presidencies of Lázaro Cárdenas and Luis Echeverría . Edited by Kiddle Amelia Muñoz María L. O. . Foreword by Cárdenas Cuauhtémoc . Tucson : University of Arizona Press , 2010 . Photographs. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xvi...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 1–30.
Published: 01 February 2019
... smells were harmful. Fully understanding this relationship, municipal leaders subjugated the San Lázaro district by relocating its indigenous population and moving noxious trades and institutions to the area. I argue that the concentration of miasmas in San Lázaro represents an environmental conquest...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 73–106.
Published: 01 February 2012
...Christopher R. Boyer; Emily Wakild This article reinterprets the pivotal presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas of Mexico, (1934–40) through the prism of environmental history. The Cárdenas administration is best known for its use of land reform, creation of mass organizations, and the nationalization of...
Image
Published: 01 February 2019
Figure 2. Map of Lima, Peru, in 1599, showing three noxious entities: Hospital San Lázaro, the butcher yards, and the tanneries, all located in San Lázaro. Figure 2. Map of Lima, Peru, in 1599, showing three noxious entities: Hospital San Lázaro, the butcher yards, and the tanneries, all More
Image
Published: 01 February 2019
Figure 3. Map of Lima, Peru, in 1599, showing noxious facilities and municipal trash sites. Hospital San Lázaro is in the upper left, Hospital Santo Toribio to its right. Figure 3. Map of Lima, Peru, in 1599, showing noxious facilities and municipal trash sites. Hospital San Lázaro is in the More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 761–763.
Published: 01 November 2016
... a picture of titanic struggle between organizations but also between ex-presidents. Lázaro Cárdenas headed the Movimiento de Liberación Nacional, which aimed to return Mexico to a more reformist path and counted on the support of an aged Vicente Lombardo Toledano. López Mateos created the right...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 194–196.
Published: 01 February 2019
... revitalize southern agricultural production while relieving the social and economic conditions of local sharecroppers. In Mexico, President Lázaro Cárdenas reignited radical agrarianism, which brought expropriations of large landholdings and redistribution of 50 million acres of land, a vast majority among...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2000) 80 (3): 565–568.
Published: 01 August 2000
... also detect in all of his work a deep respect for Mexico and its Hispanic culture and colonial institutions, which, I believe, grew out of his early field experience in the heady years of Lázaro Cárdenas. As a young man of 26, he explored the municipal, parish and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 339–340.
Published: 01 May 2018
... the Lázaro Cárdenas–era land redistribution of 1934–40. In stylistic terms, the book's excessive detail, which adds unnecessary weight and density to the narrative, could stand to be trimmed down. The quantity of names, dates, places, battles, and the like makes for a sometimes tedious read. In...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 353–354.
Published: 01 May 2018
... that the national face created by President Lázaro Cárdenas during his administration (1934–40) was based on his own personal charisma, Mexico's revolutionary past, and the nation's progressive policymaking. She examines the maintenance of this projected identity through episodes of binational...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 550–552.
Published: 01 August 2018
... who had benefited from the government's land reform policies, held the towns. After the 1929 Arreglos the state's governor (and future president) Lázaro Cárdenas was forced to have the former Cristero commander Ezequiel Mendoza Barragán head a paramilitary rural defense force in Coalcomán to pacify...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 568–569.
Published: 01 August 2018
... contaminated water. Perhaps such studies could complement the author's evident interest in “watering the revolution,” President Lázaro Cárdenas, and the October 1936 agrarian reform. It is difficult to maintain that that revolution depended on building dams; likewise, it's hard to accept that the history of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 376–377.
Published: 01 May 2019
... works as nationalist efforts. Businessmen and local elites especially benefited from these earliest projects. The next chapter shows that during the 1934–40 presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas, the well-placed found themselves less likely to prevent eminent domain seizures of their land for roadways. As those...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 558–560.
Published: 01 August 2017
... management: chummy with presidents from Lázaro Cárdenas to Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, leading light of the Academia Mexicana de la Lengua, owner of a publishing house and Librerías de Cristal, president of the ballet, director of the National Commission for Free Textbooks, eventually a senator. In his writings he...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 370–371.
Published: 01 May 2015
... administration of individuals not allied with Plutarco Elías Calles or even Lázaro Cárdenas while sidestepping the swashbuckling public behavior of his brother, Maximino. This is an intelligent narrative, buttressed by domestic and international sources. In the same deliberate, well-researched, and carefully...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 750–752.
Published: 01 November 2017
... impressive number of interviews. McCormick employs three different approaches to analyze the interlocking relationships between agrarian protest and emerging authoritarianism. More than three-quarters of the book examines how President Lázaro Cárdenas and his successors followed contradictory strategies...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 767–768.
Published: 01 November 2017
... history of food into the world of international negotiations. For me, the book's description of Mexican advocates suggested again how unique diplomats of this country were—even though we still deal with them only as part of the Western Hemisphere, something that Amelia Kiddle's essay on Lázaro Cárdenas's...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 164–165.
Published: 01 February 2015
... investigación arqueológica, etnológica, etnoarqueológica e histórica, con el que Newman ofrece una bien lograda narración que reconstruye la historia de la hacienda desde la época colonial hasta su desaparición, durante la reforma agraria cardenista, cuando el gobierno de Lázaro Cárdenas expropió y repartió las...