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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 259–296.
Published: 01 May 2017
... in reshaping the government agrarian agenda but also used the new legislation to regain lands lost to hacienda landlords since the late nineteenth century. In contrast to the Aymara intelligentsia's later denouncements, the MNR's nationalist agenda did not simply silence Indian communities' demands...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2003) 83 (4): 697–734.
Published: 01 November 2003
... the sierra north of Quito, Urvina denounced the country’s deplorable history of halfhearted state protection of the indigenous class and affirmed his commit- ment to guaranteeing “community rights” against powerful serrano landlord interests. Sympathizing with the plight of pueblos...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 564–565.
Published: 01 August 2017
.... This policy matched the interests of local landlords and rubber entrepreneurs eager to access Guarayo Indian labor. According to the government, the Franciscans had not only done little to increase economic production but had also prevented the Indians' full integration into Bolivian society. The first...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2010) 90 (3): 587–588.
Published: 01 August 2010
... only mentions in a single clause. The book describes rituals of discipline, purifi- cation, and authority that had precolonial and colonial roots and were reinvigo- rated under the late nineteenth-century García Moreno regime. It shows how hacienda landlords, overseers, and religious elders drew on...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 207–236.
Published: 01 May 2014
.... Insisting on the relevance of liberal doctrine for local politics, the petitioners confronted other residents who held on to traditional, landlord-dominated forms of authority, a situation with parallels in the Zapotec communities of Oaxaca's Sierra Norte studied by Peter Guardino. There, conflicts emerged...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 760–761.
Published: 01 November 2002
... Colombian coffee municipio and all the actors there, landlords, peasants, politi- cians, tax collectors, lawyers, local merchants and chicha makers, their interac- tions, conflicts, and agreements. In 1982, before his thesis was done, Michael moved to Princeton, where he joined Stanley Stein who...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 762–763.
Published: 01 November 2002
... Colombian coffee municipio and all the actors there, landlords, peasants, politi- cians, tax collectors, lawyers, local merchants and chicha makers, their interac- tions, conflicts, and agreements. In 1982, before his thesis was done, Michael moved to Princeton, where he joined Stanley Stein who...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 182–184.
Published: 01 February 2016
... were extremely adept at manipulating cross-class alliances, built on traditional peasant-landlord patronage, to generate support for the counterrevolution. They effectively utilized the fear of communism and its presumed challenge to traditional race and gender hierarchies and private property. As...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 755–759.
Published: 01 November 2002
... Colombian coffee municipio and all the actors there, landlords, peasants, politi- cians, tax collectors, lawyers, local merchants and chicha makers, their interac- tions, conflicts, and agreements. In 1982, before his thesis was done, Michael moved to Princeton, where he joined Stanley Stein who...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2003) 83 (3): 521–560.
Published: 01 August 2003
... that sorted peonage into three categories. In type I, debts represented salary advances within an incipient system of free wage labor; in type II, debts were derivative of voluntary and mainly market relations between landlords and peons; in type III, debts were coercive...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 531–534.
Published: 01 August 2014
... army units “earn unreported revenue through deals with actors outside the central government” (p. 30). In Ecuador, privatization of military patrols favored oil and mining companies, rural landlords, private businesses, and even municipal governments that provided food, supplies, shelter, base...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2000) 80 (3): 503–536.
Published: 01 August 2000
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2003) 83 (1): 83–118.
Published: 01 February 2003
... distinguish themselves as members of a group of honor- able people, as “gente.” The study ends on the eve of the 1953 agrarian reform, which signaled the destruction of the hacienda in Cochabamba and the expulsion of rural landlords. Successful female merchants—resembling the upwardly...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2001) 81 (1): 1–44.
Published: 01 February 2001
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): 225–266.
Published: 01 May 2000
...? 237 that were often thought of as either a colonial hold over or part of the nineteenth-century Liberal giveaway of national and indigenous lands.24 2. Landlord capitalism: Land was the most important input and latifundiários cum...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 645–684.
Published: 01 November 2002
... and death inspired a series of writers, journalists, and amateur historians. For example, in 1938, Poot appeared in a short story penned by Martín Luis Guzmán.1 Yucatecan intellectuals later cast her as the victim of reactionary landlords who sought to halt agrarian reform and thus legitimize the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2007) 87 (2): 353–362.
Published: 01 May 2007
... also have included movement within the city, a phe- nomenon that exasperated landlords and statisticians in equal measure.4 Race descriptors figure prominently; census takers must have insisted on great precision in this column of data, which contains many continuities from the colonial...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2005) 85 (1): 81–114.
Published: 01 February 2005
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 631–657.
Published: 01 November 2015
... option. The most notable case occurred in 1962 in La Convención, a valley in Cuzco department. Led by Hugo Blanco, a middle-class Trotskyist who was fluent in Quechua, armed tenants refused to pay rent for their individual plots and eventually invaded those of their landlords as well. Concerned with...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 535–570.
Published: 01 August 2006
..., 1947, vol. 3114. 40. McBride, Chile 294. 550 HAHR / August / Klubock Osorno “the tenant farmers . . . oppose their landlords, who they had respected and recognized until yesterday, calling themselves occupiers of public lands.”41 This alarm at the...