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ladino

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (2): 394–396.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr. Invención criolla, sueño ladino, pesadilla indígena: Los Altos de Guatemala: de región a estado, 1740–1871 . By Arriola Arturo Taracena . Antigua Guatemala : Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica , rev. edition, 1999 . Photographs...
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Published: 01 February 2004
Figure 7 Ladino boy as Indian, Día de Guadalupe. More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (1): 142–143.
Published: 01 February 2008
... in the eastern mountains suggests that some groups retained sufficient anti-Liberal cohesion to cause trouble. Therefore, until more comparative studies appear, Ladinos with Ladinos, Indians with Indians should be read by students and scholars of nineteenth-century Latin America as a provocative, though...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1952) 32 (1): 91–93.
Published: 01 February 1952
...Charles Wagley The Culture of Security in San Carlos: A Study of a Guatemalan Community of Indians and Ladinos . By Gillin John . [ Middle American Research Institute: Tulane University, Publication No. 16 .] ( New Orleans : Tulane Press , 1951 . Pp. vi , 128 . Tables, diagrams...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (1): 73–107.
Published: 01 February 2016
... by arguing that Mayas were not yet civilized enough for equality and freedom, Q'eqchi’ Maya patriarchs and their ladino allies argued for abolishing mandamientos by drawing upon the metanarrative charting the end of slavery and feudalism and the rise of capitalism. While scholars have illustrated...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 393–429.
Published: 01 August 1993
... to die in this way? 95 Thus the Indian authorities, following ladino orders, unleashed a campaign to terrorize the Chamorristas into submission. They provide yet another glimpse of the epoch’s repressed image of indigenous life: the amarrados (bound ones), a long file of Indians...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (4): 747–748.
Published: 01 November 1994
... civil society. The profound economic changes following World War II only made Guatemalan elites more obsessed with their conservative class standing and race consciousness. When Maya Indians and poor ladinos contested the changes wrought by modernization and the failure to redistribute national wealth...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (3): 495–534.
Published: 01 August 1999
... constructed explains the 1898 attack on the supposedly ladino juez partidor as a defensive mechanism against the wholesale and violent appropriation of community lands by outside coffee oligarchs. Without doubt the privatization of communal lands is one of the most important transformations that has...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (1): 83–111.
Published: 01 February 2004
...Figure 7 Ladino boy as Indian, Día de Guadalupe. ...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (2): 191–237.
Published: 01 May 2004
... implied by such an alliance with the movement’s urban, ladino leadership. The exploration of these themes has helped to elucidate the causes of the insurrection and its repression. Notwithstanding the great value of the existing literature, however, we feel it has privileged certain lines of inquiry...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (4): 717–718.
Published: 01 November 2005
... and ladinos , the authors suggest that a more accurate view of ethnicity is to be found in the multicultural character of the country as described in the 1996 peace accords. The data for this book is based on 16 ethnographies carried out by researchers at CIRMA (Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (2): 378–379.
Published: 01 May 1970
... . Copyright 1970 by Duke University Press 1970 This is a study of two social groups in northwestern Guatemala—Ixil Indians, who constitute more than ninety percent of the approximately 50,000 people in the three municipios examined, and Ladinos, who are local residents oriented to the national culture...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (4): 651–652.
Published: 01 November 1965
... . Paper. Copyright 1965 by Duke University Press 1965 Highland Chiapas, although it was subjected to Spanish conquest early in the sixteenth century, has continued to be exploited agriculturally primarily by Indians speaking Mayan languages and organized in village communities. Ladinos , who...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (2): 356–358.
Published: 01 May 1969
... gathered over the years 1953-1957. Through the eyes of many Indians he presents a composite view of their customs and attitudes, climaxed by the life history of one man. A historical review of the Chinautlecos’ adjustments to other Indians, local ladinos, and authority emanating from the national...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (4): 754–755.
Published: 01 November 2004
... communities,” reidentifying as ladino—a social category that included mestizos, Afro-Guatemalans, and Mayans who had fled their communities to escape labor and tribute burdens. Edgar Esquit studies the same municipality following the advent of the coffee boom, which greatly expanded the privileges...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (2): 425–426.
Published: 01 May 2003
... to a guerrilla uprising? That is what Guevarista intellectuals believed—including some of Falla’s fellow Jesuits, ladino intellectuals at San Carlos, and the Guerrilla Army of the Poor (EGP), which despite the name turned out to be led by more ladino intellectuals. There is no doubt that Catholic Action became...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (2): 227–248.
Published: 01 May 1996
... little is known, so far, about the impact of the period’s major economic and political transformations — the expansion of cash crop production for export, the corresponding movement of ladino and European landholders into remote Indian provinces of the country, the intensification of state interference...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (1): 113–115.
Published: 01 February 1967
... weaving is also reported. The author points out important cultural differences between Panajachel and the neighboring Indian community of Chichicastenango. Such Indian communities comprise more than one half of the population of Guatemala. The term ladino, applied to the balance of the population...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (3): 521–522.
Published: 01 August 1972
... to the following]; a biobibliography of public Jews, crypto-Jews and New Christians who wrote in Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Latin and/or Ladino as well as of Christians writing pro- or anti-Jewish works (both printed and manuscript items) or Jews and non-Jews whose works have been translated into Ladino [Bibl...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (1): 41–72.
Published: 01 February 2009
... organizing with ladinos (non-Mayas). Yet close attention to activists’ ideas and efforts shows that such distinctions obscure the nature of organizing in the 1970s. In practice, culturalista demands were seldom divorced from issues of social and political justice, and some culturalistas called...
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