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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2004) 84 (3): 542–543.
Published: 01 August 2004
...José O. Solá American Sugar Kingdom: The Plantation Economy of the Spanish Caribbean, 1898–1934. By césar j. ayala. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. Maps. Tables. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xii, 321 pp. Cloth, $55.00. Paper, $21.95. 2004 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 521–523.
Published: 01 August 2015
...Andrew B. Fisher The Disappearing Mestizo: Configuring Difference in the Colonial New Kingdom of Granada . By Rappaport Joanne . Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2014 . Map. Figures. Appendix. Notes. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 352 pp. Paper , $25.95 . Copyright...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 1–28.
Published: 01 February 2017
...John K. Thornton Abstract The early eighteenth century witnessed the rise to power of the Miskitu Zambos within the Miskitu Kingdom on the Caribbean coast of Honduras and Nicaragua. The Zambos were the offspring of African slaves from a pirated slave ship and the indigenous inhabitants of the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2013) 93 (2): 171–203.
Published: 01 May 2013
... suggestions about focus, and to the anonymous reviewers for their advice. A 2009 Summer Research Stipend from Bryant University funded part of the research in Guatemalan archives. Copyright 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 From the “Kingdoms of Angola” to Santiago de Guatemala: The Portuguese...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 535–536.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Michael E. Smith Book Reviews General and Sources The Art of Urbanism: How Mesoamerican Kingdoms Represented Themselves in Architecture and Imagery. Edited by william l. fash and leonardo lópez luján. Washington, DC: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collections / Cambridge, MA...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 320–322.
Published: 01 May 2018
... . Copyright © 2018 by Duke University Press 2018 When the academic study of African history began in the 1960s, Angola figured in, but largely from the perspective of the African kingdoms of the region, with scholars focusing, for example, on the history of the Kingdom of Kongo, the Kingdom of Ndongo, or...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 564–565.
Published: 01 August 2016
... active participation of the people of the Kingdom of Guatemala, not in independence per se, but in the diffusion of the Enlightenment and the ideas that would later lead to the creation of modern nations. His main objective is “to enter the minds and imagination of Central Americans” during the three...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 431–466.
Published: 01 August 2006
... colonies during the Napoleonic period — where elites had pressed medals in honor of the captive Ferdinand VII (1808) and implemented the Constitution of 1812 with vigor (1812–14 and 1820 – 21) — we might expect the Kingdom of Guatemala to have avoided the internal strife common to Spanish American...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 729–730.
Published: 01 November 2014
... the first European node in the development of the Atlantic slave trade. Before that, the peninsula was a multiethnic, multiconfessional region whose inhabitants debated ways to integrate subject and enslaved peoples within its porous borders. The medieval Iberian kingdoms in particular wrestled with...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 728–729.
Published: 01 November 2018
... focuses on the kingdom of Quito's response to the global political crisis generated by the imprisonment of Ferdinand VII in 1808. By analyzing the evolution of two concepts, pueblo (people) and sovereignty, the author seeks to demonstrate that the political language of the time used by both insurgents...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 733–734.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Max Deardorff This book—like other recent work by Jorge Augusto Gamboa Mendoza, Juan Cobo, and Joanne Rappaport—makes an effort to connect often-isolated research on the colonial New Kingdom of Granada to debates emerging from other regions of Latin America. By looking at indigenous leaders as...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 302–304.
Published: 01 May 2018
... realms encountered stark limitations, especially in discerning reliable facts from the cacophony of opinions reaching Madrid. On the other hand, these ritual communications with the kingdoms lent the crown powerful if fallible tools to undercut opposing “neo-feudal” forces (p. 103). To frame his...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2001) 81 (1): 135–138.
Published: 01 February 2001
... founder of Latin American studies in the United Kingdom. As a scholar, teacher, and administrator, he set the standards which gained for the subject academic status and funding. He was born on 6 June 1907 in Lincoln and attended Lincoln School. From there he went to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 125–129.
Published: 01 February 2019
... American history in the United Kingdom. He left London in 1954 to take up his first academic post at the University of Liverpool, which was also to become an important center for Hispanic studies and Latin American history in the United Kingdom during the 1960s. There, as lecturer in history, he taught...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2000) 80 (1): vii–viii.
Published: 01 February 2000
...-language writings from the Valley of Oaxaca. susan schroeder is France V. Scholes Professor of Colonial Latin American History at Tulane University. She is the author of Chimalpahin and the Kingdoms of Chalco (1991), editor of Native Resistance and the Pax Colonial...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 427–429.
Published: 01 August 2006
... institutions of author- ity between 1808 and 1821 contributed to their trumping, at the moment of Mexico’s declaration of independence from Spain, the authority of Spain, the Kingdom of Guatemala, and the two ephemeral provincial deputations into which the Cortes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 295–297.
Published: 01 May 2018
... of laws, practices, or customs of governmental institutions. It is useful to remember that the Iberian kingdoms were precocious in fusing medieval patrimonial practices of government to a new Weberian administrative rationalism, thus creating a mixed system of governing, and as a number of the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 726–727.
Published: 01 November 2016
... the family kingdom in Spanish. (The Mexica had their own competitive bard, don Fernando Alvarado Tezozomoc [ca. 1520/30–ca. 1609], but Alva Ixtlilxochitl's soaring prose won the Muse's prize.) In addition, the spectacular 1539 burning at the stake of don Carlos Ometochtzin, a Texcoco noble who...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 349–350.
Published: 01 May 2017
... the heart of the project, although family often translated into extended kinship units of cousins, siblings, and even neighbors, not the young reproductive couples envisioned in the plan. The crown recruited individuals from its impoverished northern kingdoms—Galicia, Asturias, and Cantabria—and later...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 375–377.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of early Anglicanism allowed for greater religious diversity in England's colonies while the increasing bureaucratization and institutionalization of the church in Spain meant greater religious conformity in that kingdom's colonies (pp. 41–45). Noting that most studies of the origins of demonology...