1-20 of 1173 Search Results for

icon

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2013) 93 (2): 306–307.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Kevin Coleman Photographing the Mexican Revolution: Commitments, Testimonies, Icons . By Mraz John . The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere . Austin : University of Texas Press , 2012 . Photographs. Notes. Bibliography. Index. x...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 329–330.
Published: 01 May 2014
... dinámicas socioculturales y los imaginarios sociales, más que en la variable demográfica que dominó los estudios inmigratorios hasta entonces. Icônes littéraires analiza la construcción social de diversas imágenes de los inmigrantes gallegos en Argentina, compartidas por la sociedad receptora y la...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2014) 94 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 February 2014
... communists’ organizational, legal, and political acumen, Rio’s iconic favelas might never have become a permanent and precious urban foothold for the migrant poor. Without the residents’ support, the Brazilian Communist Party might not have experienced electoral triumph in the late 1940s or maintained a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 103–133.
Published: 01 February 2015
...Alexander S. Dawson Abstract While María Sabina has long been an iconic figure among drug enthusiasts and advocates for indigenous rights, her sometime collaborator Salvador Roquet remains largely unknown. This essay introduces the work of this iconoclastic psychiatrist and, in particular, his work...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 342–343.
Published: 01 May 2018
... entertainment industry deconstructed her in such a way that she became a transnational icon. Throughout this process, racial hegemony reaffirmed white supremacy through the way in which Miranda “legitimiz[ed] her baiana,” as the author puts it, in the context of a Brazil dominated by white voices singing black...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 515–517.
Published: 01 August 2015
... orchestrated travels in South America via Hieronymite friar Diego de Ocaña. The reception and quasi-theatrical uses of the dark image among Andean converts offers a frame for understanding European icons in non-European contexts, and it prepares the reader for a “subjectivity of seeing” the renowned Mexican...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 376–377.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Joel Horowitz While most of Pite's observations are judicious, at times she seems to strain too hard to draw conclusions based on the experience of one figure, even if an iconic figure. Individuals are after all individuals and not representatives of a society. Clearly Doña Petrona was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 542–544.
Published: 01 August 2018
... better-known Carlos Moore, were silenced or pushed into exile for their allegedly racially divisive ideology. Especially provocative is Benson's critique of Afro-Cuban teacher Conrado Benítez's iconization as a symbol of the 1961 literacy campaign, which she mainly sees as a state-based political...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 386–387.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., though, heterogeneously adopted by American colonials. In British North America, Columbus was an emblem of individualism and liberty, as well as an icon of “entrepreneurship, and scientific progress” (p. 67). As such, he was “represented as a founder of the nation” (p. 67). Later on, stripped of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2010) 90 (1): 1–2.
Published: 01 February 2010
... from the northwest as bulwarks of national identity during a period of social dislocation. Apprehending populism through changes in the realm of consumption brings into focus actors and spaces absent from the iconic industrial scenes: here we see dining halls and parrillas, vegetable gardens...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 753–754.
Published: 01 November 2018
..., attention is given to the means and methods of production, including innovative construction techniques and the use of materials such as reinforced concrete. Several iconic and not-so-iconic projects are discussed, among them Oscar Niemeyer's undulating buildings, João Batista Vilanova Artigas's brutalism...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 745–746.
Published: 01 November 2016
... modernizing project. He focuses on Álvarez Bravo's photograph of the madre (ca. 1935). A wooden, shabbily dressed, old-fashioned icon held aloft in a sea of indifferent “modern men,” she is no longer recognizable as a figure of power (p. 222). She meets a somewhat similar fate in Yáñez's 1962 novel, Las...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 751–753.
Published: 01 November 2016
... instance, examines the celebratory political and popular culture surrounding the transformation, or “monumentalization,” of the sunken battleship USS Maine into a historical memory icon (p. 41). Amparo Sánchez Cobos looks at the labor press, in particular the anarchist weekly ¡Tierra! , which became an...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 759–761.
Published: 01 November 2016
... narrating the evolution of the iconic Maracanã stadium, built as a populist monument for the 1950 World Cup and transformed into the embodiment of contemporary commerce for the 2014 competition. This point is emphasized by Luiz Carlos Ribeiro's comments on the “desterritorialização do jogador brasileiro” in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 763–764.
Published: 01 November 2016
... community politics of the iconic residential blocks and the large barrios strewn at their feet in western Caracas known as the 23 de Enero (“el 23”), an area located a few blocks away from the seat of government that has a symbolic and politically charged legacy for modern Venezuelan democracy. Developed...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 526–527.
Published: 01 August 2014
...” inadvertently acknowledged the importance of the year long before students vested it with iconic meaning (p. 173). Only in the 1970s, as the long-term effects of military repression became clear, did students begin to tie their own efforts to mobilize into the broader collective memory of student activism in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 389–391.
Published: 01 May 2015
... about female sexuality, consumption habits, and new mores are part and parcel of early cinema history. Serna examines the friction between Hollywood's new model of femininity and the demands of the (conservative and patriarchal) Mexican postrevolutionary state, and she poignantly rescues icons Colleen...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 392–394.
Published: 01 May 2015
... imagery, popular culture icons, and the visual references used in her informants' religious art is insufficient for demonstrating their supposed reconstruction of historical memory (p. 97). More concrete evidence would have strengthened these claims. Afro-Cuban Religious Arts: Popular Expressions of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 747–748.
Published: 01 November 2017
... political performances, all under revolutionary murals, which rendered the mercado an “outpost of the campo in the city” (p. 255). The second case study is a chapter on the iconic Palacio de Bellas Artes, which transformed in form and function over the trajectory of its 30-year construction. By its 1934...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2007) 87 (3): 431–432.
Published: 01 August 2007
... examines the mobi­ lization for information orchestrated around print, celluloid, balloons, stamps, classroom discussions, and parades that appropriated the entire iconic sweep of Mexican history in the interests of extracting statistics on production and plot size. While negotiation was part of the...