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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 229–267.
Published: 01 May 2015
...David Carey, Jr. Abstract In a postcolonial nation convinced that familial peace was a cornerstone to an orderly society, women who committed adultery effectively cuckolded national leaders as well as their husbands. That men risked their reputations by admitting to their wives' extramarital...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2008) 88 (3): 427–454.
Published: 01 August 2008
... local credit market. This article shows specifically that the analysis of women's participation in economic markets in the nineteenth century must take their marital status into account, as well as the unequal legal position of husbands and wives under the laws of the time, and concludes that marital...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 736–738.
Published: 01 November 2016
... explores a wide range of emotions and experiences related to marital and extramarital life. Often reproduced in their entirety, love letters poignantly reveal lovers' intimacy and vulnerability. The passionate professions in them contrast sharply with the cruel acts of scorned husbands who tied their wives...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 183–185.
Published: 01 February 2015
... (whether related to reproductive health or not) to get “the operation” (p. 69). Reluctant husbands can also be intimidated as well. Smith-Oka describes one scene in which a woman came in with her husband and two children for a medical visit. She did not want “the operation” and requested an IUD. She was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 536–537.
Published: 01 August 2018
... Enlightenment, Premo argues that we should heed the voices of litigious African and creole slaves in Trujillo (Peru), indigenous women in two districts of Oaxaca (New Spain), and disgruntled married women seeking recompense from brutish husbands in the viceregal capitals. Premo claims that in the rural and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2005) 85 (4): 627–678.
Published: 01 November 2005
... of 1804 with respect to the subordinated posi- tion of married women. Various authors argue that the strong infl uence of the French code caused the new republics to retain the concepts of potestad marital (the rights of the husband over the person and property of his wife) and patria potestad...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2008) 88 (3): 357–359.
Published: 01 August 2008
... contracts and business agreements on her own behalf. As Juliette Levy explains in her analysis of female participa- tion in the nineteenth-century Yucatán mortgage market, under Mexican law married women could own property but could not buy, sell, rent, or mortgage it without their husband’s consent...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 726–727.
Published: 01 November 2014
... husband with few independent ideas of her own, and many questioned whether the ghostwritten text had actually been composed by the First Lady until a facsimile edition in Eva's handwriting resolved the debate. Other aspects of her intensive activities, many independent of her husband, have only recently...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2001) 81 (3-4): 587–620.
Published: 01 November 2001
... exemplar mother, has never been seen with a man other than her husband. . . . We want to clarify that the drunk Juan Pérez Hernández attempted to rape her . . . and ask that justice be done as we consider [this man] a grave danger to all young girls who...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 535–537.
Published: 01 August 2017
... clear the important roles that they performed as wives, companions, daughters, and, mainly, mothers active on behalf of their children, not always in accordance with the fathers (pp. 174–75). Spanish women—those wives left in the homeland, those who followed their husbands to Peru, or those required to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 530–531.
Published: 01 August 2014
... against an ingrained macho culture corresponded with her open warfare against her husband and her resistance to the cultural, political, and ideological machinery he both headed and represented. It is a delicious and insightful premise, which highlights unavoidable aspects, rarely discussed like any...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 February 2015
... chapter looks at how Mexican women in Texas and Mexico used American divorce laws to protect family property, to remove unwanted, dissolute, or abusive husbands, and to establish a modicum of autonomy. Moreover, divorce proceedings without church oversight were unavailable in Mexico through the Porfiriato...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 319–320.
Published: 01 May 2010
..., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “She was well liked and highly respected by her students, faculty colleagues, and many friends.” She is survived by her husband, Michael Masatsugu. Hispanic American Historical Review 90:2 Copyright 2010 by Duke University Press 320...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 339–342.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Judy Bieber Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press 2015 Betsy Kiddy, a scholar of Brazilian history and the African diaspora in the Americas, died of cancer on September 29, 2014, in her home in Reading, Pennsylvania. She is survived by her husband of 23 years, Gregory Kiddy, her parents...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 39–72.
Published: 01 February 2016
... transfer of ownership, however, was the nation's Commercial Code, which required married women to provide their husbands' written authorization for any and all commercial endeavors. 2 Carlos Andorim denied his wife permission to participate in the business. It was only when Benedicta appealed to the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 285–287.
Published: 01 May 2008
... licenciatura level, 4 master’s students, and 8 doc- toral dissertations. She is survived by her husband, Marco Antonio Silva, a philosopher and professor at the Universidad de Guadalajara. maría teresa fernández aceves, CIESAS-Occidente ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 496–498.
Published: 01 August 2014
.... Bibliography. Index. 214 pp. Paper , $24.00 . Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press 2014 This book is a collaboration between Barbara Bulmer-Thomas, a Belizean-born plant taxonomist, and Victor Bulmer-Thomas, her husband and historian of Latin American economic history. Their main goal is to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 359–361.
Published: 01 May 2015
....) are represented. His assertions based on the analysis of these cases, therefore, are more suggestive than definitive. Without a clear data set for wives suing for alimony, which was a legal obligation of husbands, Zahler's claim that such plaintiffs directly challenged patriarchal authority is not...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 159–160.
Published: 01 February 2015
... heightened pathos: “He was handsome, gentle, idealist, rumored to be the illegitimate grandson of Napoleon Bonaparte,” while “she was beautiful, fiercely ambitious, and totally devoted to her husband's cause.” Such pathos is important, because it seems to coincide with McAllen's own stated intention in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 731–732.
Published: 01 November 2014
... domestic and care work equally with their husbands, thus maintaining a patriarchal structure” (p. 243). But if this study depicts the lingering bonds of empire as rather more surly than they appear in Moya's portrayal of the Iberian Atlantic, there can be no doubt of their continuing significance...