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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (4): 633–663.
Published: 01 November 2011
...Peter B. Villella Abstract As sixteenth-century Spaniards constructed their global empire, they carried with them the racial-religious concept of “limpieza de sangre,” or blood purity, which restricted marginalized communities from exercising prestige and authority. However, the complex demographic...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (2): 203–235.
Published: 01 May 2011
... but also aimed at completely severing American ties to the Spanish monarchy. Francisco Carrascón, a peninsular prebendary resident in Cuzco who became the movement’s leading ideologue, had in 1801 unsuccessfully proposed the creation of a new viceroyalty to the Council of the Indies. In 1814, however, he...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (4): 641–668.
Published: 01 November 2016
... history as a banana enclave, areas supposedly characterized by a lack of significant economic and political connections with the nation-states that housed them. However, this article demonstrates that by the nineteenth century's end, Talamanca's indigenous residents were actively participating in one...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (2): 219–233.
Published: 01 May 2008
.... In practice, absolutist sovereigns were not autocrats. They needed money to wage war and defend against predatory rivals, and had to exchange rent-generating privileges and monopolies in order to levy taxes and borrow. Irigoin and Grafe understate, however, the differences between fiscal relations...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (4): 643–673.
Published: 01 November 2009
... on the threshold of history and on the borders of the intelligible. However, the impossibility of explaining her actions in a rational way constitutes a formidable challenge for the historian. In this respect, the article is also a reflection on the limits and possibilities of the representative faculties...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (4): 547–579.
Published: 01 November 2014
...Eva Maria Mehl Abstract Between 1765 and 1811, Mexico City sent to Manila, Philippines, about 4,000 Mexicans, including recruits and vagrants who had been sentenced to military service or public works. At this time, the Spanish empire was undertaking a military overhaul in the Pacific. However...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (1): 77–105.
Published: 01 February 2014
... to level by essentializing the pueblo . However, this official celebration of popular culture, which rendered its practitioners archaic and passive repositories of the nation’s soul, was challenged by a very dynamic, effervescent, and transnationally open music landscape driven by the activities...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (2): 297–325.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of the struggle against capitalism. These activists were highly critical of anticapitalist politics as it existed in Argentina at the time, but they also actively sought to become allies of the expanding New Left during the period. Eventually, however, the 1976–1983 military dictatorship made all forms...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (3): 471–501.
Published: 01 August 2018
... and ad hoc food distribution sites, the article explores how the UP revolution expanded long-standing practices of community-led price monitoring and food distribution to make the promise of economic democracy more concrete for urban, working-class consumers. As the JAPs' power grew, however...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (4): 605–634.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Fidel J. Tavárez Abstract After implementing comercio libre (free internal trade) in 1778, the Spanish crown endeavored to create multiple new consulados (chambers of commerce) to facilitate commercial exchange within Spain's Atlantic territories. However, while the crown established new...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (2): 285–321.
Published: 01 May 2009
... as a political strategy. Transition to proportional representation was completed in 1929 with the introduction of the quotient rule. The quotient rule was also a concession from the government. However, it was not driven by Liberalism’s potential military power but by the institutional power that Liberalism had...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (4): 681–718.
Published: 01 November 2019
... expressions of black pride. They did so, however, with varying degrees of success, much as the long legacy of devotion to slave-crafted religiosity and the survival of black discourses of identity reveal then and today. Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019 When President Barack Obama made his...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (1): 31–59.
Published: 01 February 2022
..., this case is similar to others from the late Bourbon period. The context, however, was radically different. Following the Napoleonic invasion of Spain, Venezuela was governed by the Junta Suprema Central y Gubernativa de España e Indias. This legal inquest thus offers a point of entry to examine...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (3): 377–409.
Published: 01 August 2013
... to confront the matter through the adoption of emancipation funds. As abolitionist performances extended the parameters of political participation, however, they also produced narratives of progress that both stigmatized Africanness and elided the place of freed slaves within the newly envisioned body politic...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 107–141.
Published: 01 February 2012
... during the 1930s and 1940s. By the 1960s, however, many had become opposed to foreign mountaineers and scientists “intervening” in the Andes. World War II, natural disasters, the weak nation-state, coast-sierra divisions, growing Peruvian expertise in science and engineering, and the rise of an Andean...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (4): 649–679.
Published: 01 November 2014
... of productive workers and idealized citizens for the new Paraguay envisioned by the military regime. Corporate ideas regarding gender and appropriate sexuality for male workers formed a key pillar in such initiatives. However, as the infrastructure project moved along its construction schedule and toward...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (4): 665–689.
Published: 01 November 2011
...Kathryn Burns Abstract We are rapidly revising Angel Rama’s concept of the “lettered city” ( la ciudad letrada ) to include indigenous writers and their texts. So far, however, Andeanists have focused mainly on those who wrote in Quechua or used quipu , a distinctively Andean form of record keeping...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 5–39.
Published: 01 February 2012
... of an agropastoral district in the northwest quadrant of the basin, with pueblos de indios , haciendas, and ranchos as its neighbors. The drainage curtailed everyone’s access to and usufruct of land and water for cultivation and animal husbandry in this district by diminishing their access to these inputs. However...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 41–71.
Published: 01 February 2012
... justice. As engineers struggled to fertilize the briny lands at a reasonable cost, many urban planners proposed lake conservation and afforestation over drainage and farming to secure urban prosperity. But the agricultural vision remained dominant. In the 1950s and ’60s, however, urbanization...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (4): 603–635.
Published: 01 November 2012
... exporting bases, those of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. However, the weight of politics and the legal border never ceased to make their presence felt and, indeed, were intensely manifested in the sphere of exchange. This particular branch of commerce was subject not only to numerous...
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