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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1959) 39 (3): 512.
Published: 01 August 1959
...Madaline W. Nichols Gypsies of the Pampa . By Dolinger Jane . New York , 1958 . Fleet Publishing Co . Photographs . Pp. vi , 179 . Cloth. $3.95 . Copyright 1959 by Duke University Press 1959 ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (1): 139.
Published: 01 February 1967
... Walter Starkie and his writing will welcome this delightful reprint with gratitude. This time it is not the gypsies who claim his attention, but the great medieval pilgrim routes leading from southern France to Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. Written in the great tradition of travel books...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 490–491.
Published: 01 August 1993
... contribute to the United States and what road they should travel—namely, multilingualism and integration, the true destination of this cultural odyssey. “We are Indian, black, European, but above all mixed, mestizo. We are Iberian and Greek, Roman and Jewish, Arab, Gothic, and gypsy. Spain and the New World...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (2): 337–338.
Published: 01 May 1996
...), for example. For now, let us make do with the brief definitions from the Spanish dictionary; cante flamenco: “Gypsy-influenced Andalusian song”; cante hondo, jondo: “the most genuine Andalusian, of profound sentiment.” Timothy Mitchell takes an approach that is “multidisciplinary” and “scientific...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (4): 690–691.
Published: 01 November 1972
... for the inclusion of information on the often neglected Gypsies. Another notable section deals with the “Rural World and the Seignorial Regime.” According to Domínguez Ortiz, the economic decline of the seventeenth century did not result in an abatement of seignorial purchases, but rather in an increase...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (1): 122–123.
Published: 01 February 1968
... finding their way to Berlin, and how part of the collection was recovered. The statistics in this study include a breakdown of Indians, Negroes, mestizos, and gypsies. Because sixteenth-century Brazil was predominantly male, there was what the author calls social freedom— hence the assimilation...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (1): 165–167.
Published: 01 February 1973
... Cámara, a founder of the radical Democratic Party, and a revolutionary playwright who made bandits into popular heroes; in the Catalan republican leader Ceferino Tressera, who wrote about crime, prostitution, and madness; and in Fernández y González, who took bandits and gypsies for his subjects. She...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (3): 534–535.
Published: 01 August 2010
... relevance of his social theory in today’s postmodern world. A brief chapter outlines Freyre’s early intellectual experiences in Brazil, the United States, and as a “scholar gypsy” in Europe. Freyre’s experience of “self-exile” helped him to see Brazil “from the viewpoint of an outsider as well...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (1): 61–89.
Published: 01 February 1989
... Leonor da Conceição, wife of Lieutenant Roberto Correia de Mello who sent a note supporting his wife’s application. None other than Lourenço Duarte Meira was on her examining committee. Rejecting her petition in 1799, the board noted that she was the offspring of a pardo and a gypsy woman, his second...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (4): 633–653.
Published: 01 November 1984
... in a gypsy hand, and had ended up with the Chicago Symphony. Reading in the Chicago Tribune how radical a place the university had become under Mr. Hutchins, my uncle decided it was just the place for a restless youth. In 1934 I would have gone anywhere, given a chance, since there was no particular place...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (2): 247–273.
Published: 01 May 2019
... to the exclusionary stances of other countries. 13 David Scott FitzGerald and David Cook-Martín have argued that other than irregularly enforced bans on “ gitanos , which could mean ‘gypsies,’ beggars, or Roma,” Argentine immigration legislation did not discriminate based on race or country of origin. 14...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (2): 215–232.
Published: 01 May 1969
... of the emigrants . . . who live in caves and have neither notions of morality nor habits of labor, await passage.” 20 Newspaper editorialists would add that immigration had brought to Chile hundreds of European Gypsies, a people whom El Mercurio likened to “ants, rabbits, or locusts,” in their alleged...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (3): 563–585.
Published: 01 August 1994
... of a military no longer associated with criminals, slaves, gypsies, and other marginal figures. Drawing on his own work on degregados , Coates noted the links between the military and the justice system in the early modern Portuguese Empire. In Brazil from about 1600 on, punitive exile became associated...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 555–580.
Published: 01 August 1993
... of these unauthorized public performances. Linda Curcio-Nagy (Tulane University) discussed seventeenth-century public celebrations in her paper, “Giants and Gypsies: Corpus Christi in Colonial Mexico City.” Based on municipal and viceregal records, her study examined the funding and organization of what became more...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (3): 471–499.
Published: 01 August 2009
... and gamblers and thieves, that they do nothing but drink and be idle, play music and sing, they care nothing for God or the King or any service, good or bad, nor have humility or charity, [nor] Catholic schooling, but they have great arrogance . . . . They go about like ruffians and highway robbers, gypsies...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (4): 601–631.
Published: 01 November 2011
... Departamental de Boyacá, 1965), 192. 25 Nor could Gypsies and individuals condemned for heresy make the passage; see José Luis Martínez, Pasajeros de Indias: Viajes transatlánticos en el siglo XVI (Madrid: Alianza Editorial, 1984). Notwithstanding these restrictions, there was a sizeable population...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (4): 581–614.
Published: 01 November 2014
... But it was 40 years later that a Brazilian duel, this time between two physicians in the southern city of Pelotas, first received significant press coverage. 26 Before that, in fact, the term duel was often used to refer to street fighting. For example, O Paiz reported that a gypsy named João called out...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (1): 43–76.
Published: 01 February 2000
... Univ. Press, 1981), 14, 23. Above all, the emphasis was on a process of transition, with the issue of “death” not so much the great concern as a “life” in Heaven (or Purgatory). 66 Linda A. Curcio-Nagy, “Giants and Gypsies: Corpus Christi in Colonial Mexico City,” in Rituals of Rule, Rituals...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (4): 579–612.
Published: 01 November 2017
... to people of different ethnicities, races, religions, or vassalage. It justified the rejection of converso Jews, the persecution of the Gypsies, the exclusion of individuals of African descent, and on the contrary, the welcoming to Spain of foreign vassals and foreign Catholics.” 38 According to Herzog...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (3): 549–551.
Published: 01 August 2010
... reader with an “intellectual portrait” of Freyre and to illustrate the contemporary rel- evance of his social theory in today’s postmodern world. A brief chapter outlines Freyre’s early intellectual experiences in Brazil, the United States, and as a “scholar gypsy” in Europe. Freyre’s experience...