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ganane

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (2): 259–285.
Published: 01 May 1984
... cobro, 1675.” These manuscripts are on microfilm in the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. The microfilm is a duplicate of those produced by the Centro de Documentación de Historia de México and located in the Biblioteca del Museo de Antropología, Mexico City. On the importance of gañanes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (4): 697–733.
Published: 01 November 2003
... observations are corroborated by legal sources demonstrating local obraje owners to be on the defensive in combating Indian labor mobility. 62 A lawsuit originating in 1865 is particularly illustrative of the process by which some conciertos—variously called gañanes (farmhands)— changed employers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1988) 68 (2): 209–243.
Published: 01 May 1988
... percent of all bakers, 2 percent of all shoemakers, and 1 percent of all brickmasons. No cargadores, operarios, obreros, gañanes , or stonemasons were dons.) In addition, all non-dons who were not given an occupation by the census takers (20.7 percent) were placed as laborers and servants according...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1974) 54 (1): 1–47.
Published: 01 February 1974
... tenants who rented land from the hacienda, as well as cattle owners who received grazing rights from the hacienda and in return rented out their oxen to the tenants. The tenants employed a large group of laborers to work their lands. These gañanes or inditos , as they were called, constituted...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (4): 657–682.
Published: 01 November 1985
... the Bando de Gañanes of 1785, he also observes that “when the courts discovered legitimate debts were owed, the Indians were ordered either to pay or to work. Alcaldes mayores and subdelegados showed little reluctance to pursue debtors.” “Crown Law and Rural Labor in New Spain: The Status of Gañanes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (2): 207–236.
Published: 01 May 2014
... dependent laborers [ operarios y gañanes ].” 51 Among the “jumble of nonsense” in López's presentation, this sentence stands out for its compressed rhetorical elegance. In it we glimpse a historical understanding that contrasts the old preeminence of idle ownership with the new rights of labor, here...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1961) 41 (2): 275–286.
Published: 01 May 1961
... traficantes, es muy poco lo que ganan en semejante negociación; así sus riquezas las sacan de la agricultura y de la industria. 9 [Inserted in ink.] 8 Conozco que todo lo que acabo de insinuar es una algarabía para los que no están empapados en las ideas que dejo asentadas en las cartas sobre la...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (3): 411–429.
Published: 01 August 1969
... of the Conquest period. (The workers’ names at this time were “gañán” in Mexico and still “yanacona” in Peru.) But they were still aided by a large seasonal influx of laborers from the independent Indian villages, impelled now by direct economic considerations rather than by encomienda obligation. Sometimes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (2): 217–238.
Published: 01 May 1973
... of the population. Further proof of Indian land solvency is indirectly provided by evidence that relatively few Indians of the area became resident laborers (gañanes) on adjacent haciendas. In 1801 the subdelegate reported that out of a total tributary population for Metztitlán and its sujetos of 3,497...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1971) 51 (1): 51–78.
Published: 01 February 1971
..., and the economic conditions there on the eve of Mexican independence in 1821. Copyright 1971 by Duke University Press 1971 * The author is Assistant Professor of History at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. 72 AGN, Subdelegados, 14, exp. 12, fol. 1-51. 71 Los gañanes de...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (2): 247–266.
Published: 01 May 1963
... grande destreza el arte de musica y es aproposito para ser M r o de Capilla y enseñar Musica a los Cantores que concurren y ganan salario en el dho coro se nombra para que siruia el dho oficio de mro de Capilla.” 83 Ibid ., fol. 55. 84 Ibid ., fol. 261v. An act of January 5, 1699, states...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (3): 425–449.
Published: 01 August 1989
... labor ( naboríos gañanes) , see the accounts in Cuentas de la Real Caja de Durango, May 22, 1599, AGI, Contaduría, 980-982. The question of whether missionaries should pay Indians for work on mission lands proved an ongoing one; see decree of Audiencia de Guadalajara, 1671, in Hackett, Historical...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (3): 471–501.
Published: 01 August 2018
... Sept. 1946. 40. “Quince mil personas adquieron aceite y azúcar,” El Siglo (Santiago), 3 Oct. 1946; “Ochenta mil litros de aceite se repartieron en una semana,” El Siglo (Santiago), 26 Nov. 1946; “Más de un millón de pesos semanales ganan comunistas con la venta de cupones de aceite,” La...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (2): 183–216.
Published: 01 May 1973
... far, information gathered on the hacienda of Guachalá in Ecuador is unique in this regard. Emilio Bonifaz provides the following figures on the credits or debts of the workers: Zavala, Borah and Chevalier all agree that debt peonage played a key role in tying Indians from the villages—gañanes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (3): 451–486.
Published: 01 August 2013
... to the government. Although later sources, an economic census in 1866 and the national demographic census of 1869 reported a number of ranchers (estancieros) and some property owners, along with a larger proportion of peons and laborers ( gañanes ). 60 The landed properties and the richest individuals were...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (4): 627–678.
Published: 01 November 2005
... of her property, as well as the ganan-ciales. She still needed his permission or that of a judge, however, to enter into a suit. 86 Notwithstanding, the Bello codes were thus more favorable to married women. The Leyes de Toro consolidated Hispanic rules of inheritance. In intestate succession...