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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1939) 19 (1): 2–15.
Published: 01 February 1939
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1931) 11 (2): 217–220.
Published: 01 May 1931
...Herbert Ingram Priestley Mexico and Texas, 1821-1835. University of Texas Research Lectures on the Causes of the Texas Revolution . By Barker Eugene C. . ( Dallas : P. L. Turner Co. , 1928 . Pp. 167 .) The Life of Stephen F. Austin, Founder of Texas, 1793-1836. A Chapter...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1927) 7 (3): 340–342.
Published: 01 August 1927
...William C. Binkley Copyright 1927 by Duke University Press 1927 The Life of Stephen F. Austin, Founder of Texas, 1793-1836 . By Barker Eugene C. , Professor of American History in the University of Texas. ( Dallas : Cokesbury Press , 1925 . Pp. xv , 551 . Illus. $5.00 .) ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1950) 30 (2): 238.
Published: 01 May 1950
...C.C.G. Copyright 1950 by Duke University Press 1950 The Life of Stephen F. Austin, Founder of Texas, 1793-1836, A Chapter in the Westward Movement of the Anglo-American People . By Barker Eugene C. . ( Second edition; Austin : The Texas State Historical Association , 1949...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 63–95.
Published: 01 February 2011
... court founders and officials associated child labor with immorality and family dysfunction, the court also provided a forum for working-class children and parents to argue for a different version of family morality founded on long-standing legal definitions of reciprocal obligations of support...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (3): 421–437.
Published: 01 August 1968
.... A chaplaincy was usually established by a testamentary legacy, an endowment to support a chaplain whose function was to celebrate or have celebrated masses for the soul of the founder. “It is difficult to classify chaplaincies completely and exactly, nothing concrete on the matter being found specifically...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (4): 785–787.
Published: 01 November 1975
... This study, a Spanish translation of the author’s dissertation “Mexico in Four Founders of the Ateneo” (Columbia University, 1969), concerns itself with the eclectic descriptions of Mexico written by the four most prominent members of the Ateneo de la Juventud (founded on Oct. 28, 1909)—José Vasconcelos...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (1): 120–121.
Published: 01 February 1970
... that these men were not the precursors of the modernist movement but its founders, and that in Rubén Darío one finds a pulling together of the tendencies and artistic emphases characterizing the works of these founders. To give added strength to his interpretation, Sehulman might have provided a more...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (1): 123–124.
Published: 01 February 1992
... the natives would fit into the new society. All educators were convinced education was a necessary means of propagating both religion and the dominant culture. Some, such as the founders of the Colegio de Santa Cruz de Tlatelolco, envisioned education as the door to upward mobility. To this end, they exposed...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (1): 158–159.
Published: 01 February 2009
... or other assets, and they fulfilled many purposes. In addition to assuring the ritualized and perpetual memory of a notable lineage, the chantries reinforced alliances with ecclesiastic institutions and protected family wealth: 84 percent of the founders stipulated that a succession of family members serve...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2001) 81 (1): 154–155.
Published: 01 February 2001
... to pay for masses for the benefit of the souls of the founder and his/her relatives and others stipulated in the foundation documents. The work is divided into five chapters that focus on the different aspects of the capellanía. Chapter 1 outlines the general characteristics of the capellanía...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (2): 387–389.
Published: 01 May 1983
... suggests that this work should be considered the definitive study on the subject. The founder of the first convent was María Ignacia Azlor y Echevers, the younger of the two daughters of one of the most prominent families of New Spain. She traveled to Spain to profess in the Order of Mary in Tudela...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (1): 67–98.
Published: 01 February 2013
... to the status of the founder but to the type of endowment. A priest could establish a lay endowment, and a layperson could establish an ecclesiastical endowment. The latter was created with spiritualized property or property belonging explicitly to a religious institution; lay patronage, in contrast, involved...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 February 1979
... or an audiencia residence would hardly be consistent with the founders’ early vision of an unpretentious agrarian community. Freedom from alcabala was more than an economic concession to prestige-conscious colonists—it was a clear sign of hidalguía. Before a reply to these requests could be received, disaster...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (3): 500–501.
Published: 01 August 1990
... of Sandino’s thought and its quirks is probably better than Ramírez’s. Also included are a short bibliography, a Sergio Ramírez essay with an excellent capsule history of Nicaragua and a concise biography of Sandino, and an excerpt from Viva Sandino by Carlos Fonseca, founder of the FSLN. A last short piece...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (4): 607–638.
Published: 01 November 2008
... from Tlalmanalco. Finally, after Fray Martín died while traveling from Chalco to Mexico City, many witnesses saw that his body, entombed in the monastery of Tlalmanalco, was uncorrupted. 21 Franciscan authors made a series of parallels between their order’s namesake and founder and the deeds...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (4): 794–795.
Published: 01 November 1984
..., special emphasis is placed on those who remained and became founders of the country. An appendix provides brief biographical information on 86 of these. Meléndez is drawn to the present project not by the irresistible richness of archival material but by the fundamental importance of the subject. He...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1962) 42 (3): 417–418.
Published: 01 August 1962
... of the Falange’s founder, José Antonio Primo de Rivera. After demonstrating how José Antonio’s chaotic minority movement had always been checked by assassinations, reprisals, and conflicting ideologies ranging from socialist revolution to neo-Nazi corporatism, Payne proceeds to trace the steady decline...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (4): 551–552.
Published: 01 November 1963
... population, Christians Old and New, accused of heresy, practice of Jewish rites, blasphemy, immorality, sorcery, and superstition. Greenleaf concludes that “Zumárraga’s activities as Apostolic Inquisitor and real founder of the Mexican Inquisition were comparable to those of Mendoza as founder...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (3): 444–475.
Published: 01 August 1979
..., Migración y cambio social , and Christie, “Antioqueño Colonization.” 46 Arango Mejía, Genealogías , notes the dates of arrival and important dates in the lives of family founders. For example, he records that Don Baltasar Tamayo (whose descendants are fourth generation in 1780-1810) wrote...