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evita

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (4): 726–727.
Published: 01 November 2014
... realities that Eva never had encountered. But it needs to be a cultural study that takes Juan into consideration along with Eva and that embeds these figures into an understanding of an ever-changing political movement. “Evita vive”: Estudios literarios y culturales sobre Eva Perón . Edited...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (2): 438–440.
Published: 01 May 2003
...James P. Brennan Poor People’s Politics: Peronist Survival Networks and the Legacy of Evita . By Auyero Javier . Durham : Duke University Press , 2001 . Illustration. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index . xiv , 257 pp. Cloth , $54.95 . Paper , $18.95 . Copyright 2003...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (2): 415–416.
Published: 01 May 2007
...Joel Horowitz Domingo A. Mercante: A Democrat in the Shadow of Perón and Evita . By Becker Carolyn A. . Philadelphia : Xlibris Corporation , 2005 . Photographs. Illustration. Map. Bibliography. Index. Cloth , $29.69 . Paper , $19.54 . © 2007 by Duke University Press 2007...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (3): 509–510.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Gregory Hammond After this initial analysis and a review of some of Evita’s most important work, particularly that of her foundation, Zanatta focuses the bulk of her study on Evita’s rivals within the government and the nation — in particular, within the military, the church, and the foreign...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (4): 801.
Published: 01 November 1983
... phenomenon that still arouses intensely passionate debate among Argentines. The book is a detailed account of Evita’s life, from her illegitimate and poor small-town origins to her death in 1952 as the beautiful and powerful wife of the president of Argentina. The final chapter deals with the mystery...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (4): 741–742.
Published: 01 November 1970
..., and a short, poorly selected bibliography. Every Latin American scholar will wonder why the six politicians selected were Che Guevara, Alfredo Stroessner, Eduardo Frei Montalvo, Juscelino Kubitschek, Carlos Lacerda, and Evita Perón. Bourne thought that each of these represented a type of Latin American...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (2): 361–362.
Published: 01 May 2010
... and Evita Perón molded over the following years. Any new work on the subject requires particular attention to the existing historiography and a careful articulation of the author’s own position. In his new book, Mariano Ben Plotkin embraces these requirements, expanding on his excellent earlier work while...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (4): 778–780.
Published: 01 November 2007
... and need for responsiveness. The public face of affordable housing for workers was Evita Perón and the foundation established in her name. While Evita represented the state’s graciousness, state planners competed to promote their diverse array of housing paradigms. Thus, the hegemonic populist discourse...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (4): 725–726.
Published: 01 November 2011
... of Juan and Evita Perón in Argentina, but also the manner in which Peronism seems to embody some deeper character of all of Latin America. Peronism signifies more than changes in the “rules of the game” in the economic and political sense, but also in the way we talk about the game and understand...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (1): 111–149.
Published: 01 February 2007
... sacred space [ recinto ], the altar of our emotions, is in danger,” warned Evita. “Over it hovers threateningly the unspeakable machinations [ incalificable maniobra ] of speculation and usury.” 25 The religious overtones of Evita’s statements highlighted the Manichean terms of consumer politics...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (3): 539–541.
Published: 01 August 2009
...-mativos de Perón/Evita y escenario del avance de los cabecitas negras , vistos con estupor por la elite (Borges/Bioy Casares) y el intelectual liberal (Cortázar). Textos que, señala Podalsky, “bemoan the way Peronism chipped away at the boundary between spectacle and spectator characteristic of high...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (4): 809.
Published: 01 November 1983
... 1983 by Duke University Press 1983 The Cycle of Peronism, by Frederick C. Turner; Evita and Peronism, by Marysa Navarro; Workers and Wages: Argentine Labor and the Incomes Policy Problem, by Gary W. Wynia; Trade Unions and Peronism, by Juan Carlos D’Abate; Religion and Social Conflict...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (4): 804–805.
Published: 01 November 1984
..., Isabel Martínez de Perón. To some degree, this is a “revisionist” biography. Although Page comments in his final chapter that “there is much to dislike in Perón,” he takes a more sympathetic or understanding position toward Perón and Evita in particular situations than has been customary in most...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (1): 118–119.
Published: 01 February 1964
... of significant discussions of communist influence. By way of downward revision, Bolivia and Ecuador have only two sentences devoted to them in this chapter. Most people would think they deserved more. And this reviewer expected to see Evita Perón mentioned in connection with the lamentable mismanagement...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (1): 216–217.
Published: 01 February 1983
... circumstances in each country that nonetheless gave rise to the same world phenomenon. Blakely’s Stalin and Szasz’s Huey Long are depicted as populists (pp. 184, 207-208), as are Yrigoyen, Juan Domingo and Evita Perón, Vargas, Betancourt, Haya de la Torre, and Echeverría elsewhere. It is not totally clear...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (1): 154–155.
Published: 01 February 2018
... created during the years when Juan Domingo Perón's leadership was cemented (1945–1947). Very original is the author's analysis of the role of women in the organization of the María Eva Duarte de Perón centers as well as her examination of the horizontal relationship that Evita tried to sustain with her...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (1): 147–148.
Published: 01 February 2008
... and expectations about the nation while seeking to modernize the environment. The MOP and FEP’s plans for the development of Greater Buenos Aires southwest area, including the International Airport of Ezeiza, garden cities (Ciudad Evita), public recreational facilities ( balnearios ), and the highway to the city...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (4): 687–688.
Published: 01 November 2005
... to the manifold interpretations of Evita and attempts to separate myth from historically founded analysis. The cases of Domitila Barrios and Rigoberta Menchú give opportunity for a discussion of the controversies regarding testimonio literature. Each chapter’s concise bibliographic essay, indicating her sources...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (2): 382–384.
Published: 01 May 2012
... Cup,” go far beyond ethnicity. Rein’s interests are much broader and include the relationship of Juan Domingo Perón and Evita Perón to the organized Jewish community, the US State Department’s unrelenting opposition to Perón, the vicissitudes of the Argentine Catholic Church (particularly over...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (2): 259–306.
Published: 01 May 1991
..., industrialists, and middle sectors, the bourgeoisie. Both the bourgeois and proletarian characters of the movement also found their expression in Eva as the señora burguesa” and Compañera Evita, as described by Juan José Sebreli. The “señora burguesa” or “primera dama” of the early years was a passive wife who...