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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2004) 84 (3): 546–547.
Published: 01 August 2004
...Jorge I. Domínguez Building the Fourth Estate: Democratization and the Rise of the Free Press in Mexico. By chappell h. lawson. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. Figures. Tables. Appendix. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 287 pp. Cloth, $50.00. Paper, $19.95. 2004 by Duke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 685–718.
Published: 01 November 2002
...Rafael Dobado González 2002 by Duke University Press 2002 El monopolio estatal del mercurio en Nueva España durante el siglo XVIII Rafael Dobado González Siendo la administración, y distribución de reales azogues uno de los principales polos en que estriba el cuerpo místico de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2009) 89 (3): 471–499.
Published: 01 August 2009
...Karen B. Graubart This article investigates two local coinages used in notarial documents, especially wills and real estate sales contracts, in urban early colonial Peru: the “indio solarero” and the “indio criollo.” These terms, apparently invented by the indigenous parties or with their approval...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 207–236.
Published: 01 May 2014
... estates, or haciendas, where settlements existed on privately owned land? How did local governance function in the absence of public space for republican institutions to grow in? This article examines the challenges to landed power initiated by requests from two hacienda communities in the state of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 259–296.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Carmen Soliz Abstract When analyzing the effects of the 1952 Bolivian Revolution in the countryside, scholars have highlighted the political role of the colonos (tenants) and the extended program of land redistribution of large estates that started soon after the government decreed the agrarian...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 209–245.
Published: 01 May 2019
... the Jesus estate—one an illegitimate child, the other a former slave—reveals complex social and legal dynamics that surrounded debates over illegitimacy and family rights throughout the nineteenth century. Digging deeper into the life story of the African-descended grandfather whose death sparked the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 535–570.
Published: 01 August 2006
... constituted a colossal waste, since only a small amount of the forests’ valuable timber was actually extracted. In addition, landowners and loggers did nothing to regener- ate the forests they destroyed.19 The transfer of forests on the frontier to estate owners and colonization companies led to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2005) 85 (2): 223–258.
Published: 01 May 2005
... 1840s, after which they more than doubled by the mid-1850s.6 The Data My data were drawn from samples of postmortem estate inventories (inventários) covering each of the two periods and drawn from three locations: the city of Rio de Janeiro, the counties (municípios) of São João del-Rei and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 147–149.
Published: 01 February 2019
... colonial state societies had flourished and their descendants—albeit diminished in numbers—still occupied ancestral lands in hundreds of repúblicas de indios . In both books, Tutino's long-standing interests in conflict and stability, rural estates, peasant societies, labor relations, and the social...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 545–547.
Published: 01 August 2017
... single sugar mill (making him a “propietario medio” in Hernández González's estimation) (p. 28). Apparently, while Arango had lots of theories about improving estate productivity, he was not a hands-on administrator, often delegating the day-to-day affairs to relatives. He began a modest career as a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 339–340.
Published: 01 May 2017
.... Illustrations. Maps. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xv, 268 pp. Paper , $45.00 . For all the attention that has been paid to the magnificent Inca site of Machu Picchu, we know surprisingly little about the intimate landscapes where life took place within Inca royal estates. Insightful, evocative, and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2003) 83 (4): 697–734.
Published: 01 November 2003
... expense of customary landlord and church power. Second, it details the upsurge of popular politics and litigation, as indigenous peasants and estate peons began to employ Urvinista discourse and law to lever- age their day-to-day negotiations over labor conditions and mobility. Third, the article...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2012) 92 (2): 209–211.
Published: 01 May 2012
... how conceptions of honor varied among different sectors of the Brazilian elite. When rancher Boaventura José de Oliveira agreed in 1829 to sell his rural estate to urban merchant João Francisco Vieira Braga, both men were pleased with the bargain they had struck. The following year, however, the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 358–359.
Published: 01 May 2015
... Trinidad took advantage of the region's underdeveloped commercial networks and amassed their fortunes by huckstering, renting out the services of enslaved Africans, and speculating in real estate. Others like Jeanette Philip and Judith Philip of Grenada owned profitable estates. These free women of color...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 485–521.
Published: 01 August 2017
...Francisca Rengifo La discusión e institucionalización de la seguridad social en Chile caracterizaron un primer periodo regulatorio que comprometió la acción estatal en funciones sociales de protección a los trabajadores. La implementación del nuevo cometido social del Estado fue resultado de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2003) 83 (3): 451–486.
Published: 01 August 2003
... 1819 he possessed a mere three thousand gold pesos, less than 1 percent of the estate he would accumulate during the remainder of his life- time.10 It is not surprising, therefore, that he chose to start his career as a landowner by making good use of Buenos Aires’s emphyteutic regime...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2005) 85 (1): 39–80.
Published: 01 February 2005
..., Francisco Arias Thenorio ratifi ed his brother’s wishes in a document stating that, as heir and executor of his brother’s estate, he approved of Leonor’s liberty, “so that as a free person she could enjoy it and go where she cared to, deal and make contracts, make a testament, and appear in court and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2008) 88 (3): 427–454.
Published: 01 August 2008
.... This is especially true in agricultural and preindustrial regions such as nineteenth-century Yucatán, where property often took the form of real estate and effective ownership of landed estate was central to the lending process. In the case of mortgages, by definition secured by land, the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 122–123.
Published: 01 February 2018
... that he wrought on the social and political order of an Andean village. Since the estate of Albadán also included a remarkable set of personal letters that he had received while in Pampachiri, Hyland is also able to enter into the troubled personal history of this priest as well as his relationships...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2003) 83 (3): 521–560.
Published: 01 August 2003
... privately owned. Before coffee, peasants labored largely in household and communal production; afterward, many rural Nicaraguans worked on coffee estates for several months out of the year.1 In the past, historians viewed this revolution in land and labor as Nicaragua’s capitalist transition...