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epidemic

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 592–593.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Blanca G. Silvestrini Epidemic Invasions: Yellow Fever and the Limits of Cuban Independence, 1878 – 1930 . By Espinosa Mariola . Chicago : University of Chicago Press , 2009 . Photographs. Illustrations. Map. Notes. Bibiography. Index . 189 pp. Paper, $22.50. Cloth, $55.00...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2003) 83 (4): 766–767.
Published: 01 November 2003
...Ann Zulawski The Return of the Epidemics: Health and Society in Peru during the Twentieth Century. By marcos cueto. The History of Medicine in Context. Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate, 2001. Table. Notes. Bibliography. Index. x,176 pp. Cloth, $79.95. 2003 by Duke University Press 2003 Book...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2004) 84 (4): 717–719.
Published: 01 November 2004
...Daniel W. Gade A Pest in the Land: New World Epidemics in a Global Perspective. By suzanne austin alchon. Diálogos. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. Illustrations. Maps. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index. ix, 214 pp. Cloth, $45.00. Paper, $22.95. 2004 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 580–581.
Published: 01 August 2012
...David Sowell Diseased Relations: Epidemics, Public Health, and State-Building in Yucatán, Mexico, 1847 – 1924 . By McCrea Heather . Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press , 2010 . Illustrations. Maps. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 288 pp. Paper , $27.95 . Copyright 2012...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2013) 93 (1): 33–65.
Published: 01 February 2013
...Paul Ramírez; William B. Taylor Colonial inhabitants of Mexico City were accustomed to coping with natural disasters, including disease epidemics, droughts, floods, and earthquakes, which menaced rich and poor alike and stirred fervent devotion to miraculous images and their shrines. This article...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 481–515.
Published: 01 August 2016
... defining characteristics of early colonial experience: epidemic disease and ongoing idolatries. In 1613, Pedro Sánchez de Aguilar commenced upon a lofty project. The secular priest's goal was to inform Philip IV of the idolatries still enacted by the Maya of the Yucatán peninsula and to explain why such...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 157–158.
Published: 01 February 2017
... missions. Using census and baptismal records from Jesuit missions, he concludes that populations in Paraguay and the Chiquitos region “rebounded or recovered following catastrophic epidemic outbreaks” (p. 5). This stands in stark contrast to other places “such as central Mexico or the Andean region,” which...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2013) 93 (1): v.
Published: 01 February 2013
... Reform, and Popular Protest in Oaxaca’s Smallpox Epidemic, 1796 – 1797,” published in The Americas (2012). In residence at the Huntington Library as the Dana and David Dornsife Fellow in the 2012 – 13 academic year, he is completing a history of the inception and reception of enlightenment public...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 730–731.
Published: 01 November 2017
... other geographical contexts (or even later Latin American ones), but, as Few points out, the colonial period remains comparatively underexplored. Attention to this earlier period, however, has served Few well. Here, we find compelling accounts of the popular and medical treatment of epidemic death in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 168–169.
Published: 01 February 2017
... literature that emphasizes the importance of historical analyses of science and technology, particularly the history of medicine. It is a subfield of Latin American history that needs more development, particularly in light of emerging tropical epidemics such as the Zika virus. A key theme that underlies...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 513–514.
Published: 01 August 2018
... a way of life that was alien to them, and the congregations exposed them to diseases and epidemics that they could not resist. So their congregations disappeared when the Franciscans left. However, the conclusion that the Pames and Jonaces were extinct by the end of the colonial period is an...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 415–419.
Published: 01 August 2016
... very same regurgitation that emanated from the papal bull of Pope Paul III, but the pope referred to this vomit as emanating from Judaism. Solari argues that this visceral metaphor extended to the close relationship that Spaniards believed to exist between idolatry and disease. In fact, as epidemic...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 391–393.
Published: 01 May 2019
... educational personnel also promotes an image of socialist solidarity surviving heroically for six decades under the very nose of the world's most powerful capitalist country. This is no small tale in these days of opioid epidemics and school shootings in the hegemon. Exporting Revolution: Cuba's Global...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2003) 83 (1): 3–52.
Published: 01 February 2003
... into thirty villages, but a smallpox epidemic erupted at the end of 1518, wiping out many of the surviving Indians. When the Hyeronimites went back to Spain in 1519, many Spanish settlements had been abandoned and very little gold was mined, but plantations of sugarcane were initiated with the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2009) 89 (4): 571–572.
Published: 01 November 2009
..., and fears of epidemic disease led to quar- antines and other disruptions of commerce. Public health was therefore central to the Porfirian modernization project. Moreover, the Mexican Superior Health Council, which joined the American Public Health Association in 1890, came to act as an...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 736–738.
Published: 01 November 2016
... maintaining peace and order raped their charges (p. 144). In some ways, Of Love and Loathing provides historical precedent for the contemporary epidemic of gender-based violence in the region. Like scholars before him, Robins points out that women's mobility and liberation often came at great costs...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 771–773.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Clara Mantini-Briggs is a gripping book that breaks with conventional anthropological narratives of the outbreak of an epidemic. Their previous collaborative book, Stories in the Time of Cholera: Racial Profiling during a Medical Nightmare (2003), examined the aftermath of a cholera outbreak in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 575–576.
Published: 01 August 2017
... on an ever-increasing scale various epidemics. These factors unleashed a rationalist and scientific campaign led by both authorities and specialists, who found a voice and public in the newspapers and who came to see the black slave trade as a serious threat to public health. On the other hand, the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 519–521.
Published: 01 August 2015
... mission system” (p. 21) is welcome as long as it does not obscure the imbalances of power that pervaded the lives of many native peoples in the Spanish empire, including the borderlands. Negotiations were often asymmetrical. Old World epidemic diseases and Spanish encroachment transformed many missions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 671–673.
Published: 01 November 2015
... texts. Heather McCrea examines the different regimes for dealing with disease in postindependence Yucatán, where attempts to control epidemic-causing insects were often closely associated with efforts to control the native Maya population. Neel Ahuja moves into the twentieth century to examine the role...