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dyewood

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (1): 113–136.
Published: 01 February 2000
... hoping to increase trade with the Spanish and protect the logwood trade at Belize, not expand Britain’s source of logwood. 30 No British author who resided in or visited the Black River settlement ever described logwood, or any other dyewood, among the region’s economic resources. In 1751 Jamaican...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (3): 523–524.
Published: 01 August 1981
... avoid superficial generalizations. Portugal’s imperial thrust was to acquire trading posts, not colonies, to control the spice trade. Brazil had little to offer but dyewood. Permanent colonies were necessary, nevertheless, to secure the land against French intruders. To support these colonies...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (3): 600–601.
Published: 01 August 1996
... interprets indigenous and immigrant mentalities, the dyewood trade, plantation cultures, the gold rush, the Luso-Brazilian Enlightenment, land policy, the formation of the peasantry, liberalism, positivism, developmentalism, and militarism, returning always to his central theme of a “contradiction inherent...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (3): 642–643.
Published: 01 August 2000
... and measles. Spanish American silver receives similar treatment, while Brazilian gold is ignored. Dyewood, sugar, cacao, coffee, tobacco, and coca all receive mention, but largely in reference to European markets. There is little of the social, ecological or demographic impact on local producers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (4): 696–698.
Published: 01 November 2013
...; slaves from Upper Guinea, the Gold Coast, and West Africa; cacao, tobacco, hides, and mules from Tierra Firme; sugar, coffee, cotton, and indigo from the islands of the British, French, and Danish Caribbean; and dyewood from Central America. Willemstad was a rich, sprawling cosmopolitan port in which a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (4): 625–628.
Published: 01 November 1965
... million pesos at the end. This rate of growth was considerably higher than the world rate. While in 1877 hardwoods, dyewoods, tanned hides, mulberry wood, and henequen rope occupied significant positions in the total export composite, by the end of the period all of these had been relegated to positions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1978) 58 (3): 477–480.
Published: 01 August 1978
... approved these proposals. Meanwhile, stressing strict mercantilist principles, Gil cancelled dyewood trade concessions which his predecessor had granted foreign businessmen in return for flour supplies to feed the forces in Darién. 7 Gil’s financial strategy was well conceived. Although revenues did...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (3): 533–537.
Published: 01 August 2019
... Russia, the Baltic, and Scandinavia were an integral part of Atlantic world trade and international relations during the Age of Revolutions. US merchant vessels traded slave-produced sugar, coffee, indigo, rum, mahogany, and dyewoods from the West Indies, Carolina rice, a little cotton, and Spanish...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (4): 681–694.
Published: 01 November 2000
... humanist Andre Thevet’s observation of Brazil. The early French presence on the Brazilian coast and interest of Norman and Breton mariners and merchants in the dyewood trade are too often overlooked, but in recent years the renewed interest in early contacts between indigenous peoples and Europeans has...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1971) 51 (2): 295–312.
Published: 01 May 1971
... important source of Indian slaves, timber, dyewood, naval stores, and foodstuffs for the Viceroyalty of Peru. The great bulk of this traffic moved through the port and villa of Realejo, at the head of a mangrove-lined estuary some 8 kilometers up river from the modem Pacific coast port of Corinto. Today...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (4): 683–723.
Published: 01 November 1985
...-eighteenth century to independence. Alden is the only writer on fishing and whaling, and John Vogt is the only scholar to join Alexander Marchant in an examination of the early period of the dyewood trade and the feitoria system. Rivalries between sugar planters and cattlemen were particularly fierce in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (3): 381–419.
Published: 01 August 2014
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (3): 481–515.
Published: 01 August 2016
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (4): 623–654.
Published: 01 November 2020
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (4): 677–706.
Published: 01 November 1983
... were often sent to Jamaica or even England to be educated, and the alliance was kept lubricated by gifts of firearms, trinkets, and rum. 16 English cultivation of the Mosquitos was directly related to the need to protect the lucrative dyewood or logwood cutting industry that had developed in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (2): 173–205.
Published: 01 May 1963
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (2): 261–290.
Published: 01 May 1993
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (3): 463–501.
Published: 01 August 2000
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (4): 555–592.
Published: 01 November 1992
... the decline of Yucatán’s traditional exports of hides, beef, tallow, and dyewood; in part a reflection of the new opportunities that came with the end of Spanish control; and in part an effort to find a profitable use for the seemingly uncultivable, limestone-choked terrain of the northwest. 8 But...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (4): 697–735.
Published: 01 November 1991
.... Indeed, on the face of things, U.S. imports of silver, hides, dyewood, and indigo from Mexico move somewhat in advance of U.S. exports to Mexico, especially before the late 1860s. This pattern may suggest an “export-led” model of Mexican growth that persisted until the onset of the depreciation of silver...