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durango

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1942) 22 (1): 174–175.
Published: 01 February 1942
...Roscoe R. Hill Copyright 1942 by Duke University Press 1942 Apuntes para la historia de la Nueva Vizcaya: No. 2, La Ciudad de Durango, 1563-1821 . By Saravia Atanasio G. . ( Mexico : Instituto Panamericano de Geografía e Historia [Publicación No. 53] , 1941 . Pp. 245 .) ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1939) 19 (3): 314–317.
Published: 01 August 1939
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (2): 239–273.
Published: 01 May 1992
...David W. Walker Although this local movement to gain access to more political and economic resources was eventually undone by the outcome of the other, larger Mexican Revolution, the homegrown revolution changed forever the economic and political landscape of eastern Durango. Obregón’s successor...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (3): 578–579.
Published: 01 August 1979
...Paul J. Vanderwood Farewell to Durango: A German Lady’s Diary in Mexico, 1910-1911 . By Bose Johanne Caroline Wehmeyer . Edited by Blew Robert W. . Translated by Bose John Carlos . Lake Oswego, Oregon , 1978 . Smith, Smith and Smith Publishing Company . Illustrations...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (4): 770–771.
Published: 01 November 1983
...Richard J. Salvucci Tierra adentro: Settlement and Society in Colonial Durango . By Swann Michael M. . Boulder : Westview Press , 1982 . Maps. Figures. Tables. Notes. Glossary. Bibliography. Index . Pp. xxxiv , 444 . Paper . $25.00 . Copyright 1983 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2001) 81 (2): 390–391.
Published: 01 May 2001
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (1): 34–64.
Published: 01 February 1963
... Mexico near present Lajitas, Texas, and bore south westward to the Río Conchos. Following the Conchos and the Río Florido through good farm and ranch country 5 into Durango, this trail passed over the Río del Oro and went up Ramos Valley, where the raiders took hundreds of captives and thousands...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2002) 82 (3): 637–639.
Published: 01 August 2002
... and writing. Selected Works by David Wayne Walker “ Homegrown Revolution: The Hacienda Santa Catalina del Alamo and Agrarian Protest in Eastern Durango, Mexico, 1897–1913 .” HAHR 72 , no. 2 ( 1992 ): 239 – 73 . Kinship, Business, and Politics: The Martínez del Rio Family in Mexico, 1824–1867...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (4): 579–608.
Published: 01 November 1990
.... Sometimes the authorities in Mexico City or in a local jurisdiction were able to protect landholders indirectly for years by simply not acting on a survey or refusing to issue a title to the company pending the outcome of a protest, to the intense irritation of the surveyors. It took Durango surveyor Col...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (3): 425–454.
Published: 01 August 1977
... planters and the governments of Durango and Coahuila. It also reviews the government’s attempt to use federal regulations to adapt the Tlahualilo concession to the political and economic situation in the region. The third section examines the economic considerations which determined the government’s policy...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (4): 744–745.
Published: 01 November 1981
.... His history of Durango offers a good picture of a nonmining town in colonial northern Mexico. Isolated (the main north-south route from Parral to Zacatecas often bypassed Durango), and vulnerable to Indian attack, Durango’s development was slow despite a terrain favorable to stockraising. Saravia...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (3): 467–499.
Published: 01 August 2019
... with, mostly in urban areas, a modest increase in literacy. 8 My emphasis is on, but not limited to, those states that produced the most powerful agrarian insurgencies of the revolution: Morelos, Chihuahua, Durango, and Coahuila. In these states, there is enough of a natural archive to scrutinize press...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (3): 425–449.
Published: 01 August 1989
... relations in agriculturally productive areas of Nueva Vizcaya. The Nueva Vizcayan heartland examined here encompasses the hill and valley region of the Sierra Madre’s central plateau, running between Durango and Chihuahua. This study will illustrate that, for agricultural purposes, slavery and encomienda...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1987) 67 (3): 371–404.
Published: 01 August 1987
... centered around Mapimí [Durango] and, to a lesser extent, around the old Viesca mines in Coahuila. At Mapimí, for example, there were seven mines operating in 1886 producing gold, silver, lead, and copper, plus a smelter and six foundries. The biggest mines were tied to the important Compañía de Peñoles...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (1): 107–108.
Published: 01 February 1997
... of the viceregal court in distant Mexico City, other events associated with Zacatecas and Durango, and a 1692 census of the El Paso settlements. Overall, the editors and translators have done a superb job of bringing difficult manuscript materials to print. Part 1 is an excellent summary of the events...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (2): 311–312.
Published: 01 May 1981
.... Zumárraga remained in close contact with his family in Durango, Vizcaya, frequently involving himself in matters such as marriages, deaths, and financial affairs; he was the generous benefactor of a lay order of Franciscan women in Durango who performed social and charitable works; and he nurtured a near...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (3): 552–553.
Published: 01 August 2012
... the most complete set of series of silver production in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Mexico that can be obtained from currently known sources. Annual figures for production, measured in pesos of eight reales , are presented for the treasury districts of Zacatecas, Guadalajara, Durango, Sombrerete...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (1): 124–126.
Published: 01 February 1999
... regions of New Spain—Bolaños, Durango, Guadalajara, Guanajuato, México, Pachuca, San Luis Potosí, Sombrerete, Zacatecas, and Zimapán—with particular emphasis on Pachuca and Zimapán. But it is more than just a study of one small epoch: the author also deals with broader issues such as long-range mining...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1980) 60 (2): 213–238.
Published: 01 May 1980
... in Durango, the Federal District, Sinaloa, and Sonora did restitutions exceed grants, and the last two states were, of course, areas with which Obregón himself was intimately familiar. Further, they were regions from which Obregón had drawn extensive military support throughout the revolutionary years...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (4): 635–667.
Published: 01 November 2018
..., 2.6 percent); Hidalgo (24, 2.2 percent); Aguascalientes and Nuevo León (both with 23, 2.1 percent); Chihuahua (22, 2 percent); Yucatán (20, 1.8 percent); Tlaxcala (15, 1.4 percent); Chiapas (11, 1 percent); Sinaloa (10, 0.9 percent); Puebla (8, 0.7 percent); Zacatecas and Durango (both with 7, 0.6...
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