1-20 of 2003 Search Results for

disease

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2005) 85 (4): 683–684.
Published: 01 November 2005
...Ronn Pineo Disease in the History of Modern Latin America: From Malaria to AIDS. Edited by diego armus. Durham: Duke University Press,2003. Photographs. Illustrations. Notes. Index. vii, 326 pp. Cloth, $64.95. Paper, $21.95. 2005 by Duke University Press 2005 Book Reviews General...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 575–576.
Published: 01 August 2017
...Junia Furtado Disease, Resistance, and Lies: The Demise of the Transatlantic Slave Trade to Brazil and Cuba . By Graden Dale T. . Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press , 2014 . Maps. Tables. Appendix. Notes. Index. x, 291 pp. Paper , $35.00 . Copyright © 2017 by Duke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 481–515.
Published: 01 August 2016
...Amara Solari Abstract In the colonial theater of New Spain, multiple actors utilized the rhetoric of disease to discuss and describe the ongoing discoveries of indigenous traditional religion, which they termed idolatry. Focusing primarily on Yucatán, this article closely analyzes these usages...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2002) 82 (1): 162–163.
Published: 01 February 2002
...Diego Armus Subjects of Crisis: Race and Gender as Disease in Latin America. By benigno trigo. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press;Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 2000. Photographs. Illustrations. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xii, 157 pp. Cloth, $45.00. Paper,$19.95...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 580–581.
Published: 01 August 2012
...David Sowell Diseased Relations: Epidemics, Public Health, and State-Building in Yucatán, Mexico, 1847 – 1924 . By McCrea Heather . Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press , 2010 . Illustrations. Maps. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 288 pp. Paper , $27.95 . Copyright 2012...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2009) 89 (4): 573–602.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Paul Ross In the late nineteenth century, Mexico's Superior Health Council devised a consistent and assertive international strategy around alignment with international scientific standards, the control of disease certification on Mexican soil by Mexican experts, transparent disease reporting...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2012) 92 (4): 603–635.
Published: 01 November 2012
...Maria-Aparecida Lopes; Paolo Riguzzi This article analyzes the livestock exchange between the United States and Mexico, beginning with the initial surge in regular trade in the 1870s until its interruption caused by the outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in 1947. Since the final two decades of the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2013) 93 (1): 33–65.
Published: 01 February 2013
...Paul Ramírez; William B. Taylor Colonial inhabitants of Mexico City were accustomed to coping with natural disasters, including disease epidemics, droughts, floods, and earthquakes, which menaced rich and poor alike and stirred fervent devotion to miraculous images and their shrines. This article...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 469–502.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Nancy Leys Stepan This article examines the relationship between the Rockefeller Foundation (RF) and Brazil in the era of Dr. Carlos Chagas, from the RF's first visit to Brazil in 1916 to the late 1920s. Chagas's discovery in 1909 of a hitherto unknown human disease (American trypanosomiasis) made...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 540–541.
Published: 01 August 2015
... In The Ailing City: Health, Tuberculosis, and Culture in Buenos Aires, 1870–1950 , Diego Armus provides a sweeping analysis of how tuberculosis shaped modernity and urban life in Argentina's largest city during the period between the discovery of the disease's cause and the development of effective...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 415–419.
Published: 01 August 2016
... challenging us to think about and develop new methodologies and technologies. By focusing on sexuality, mapping borders, the connections between idolatry and disease, and the relationship between language and the law, these scholars provide deeply interdisciplinary accounts to reassess the forms that power...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 157–158.
Published: 01 February 2017
... disease at endemic rates. Moreover, Jackson's detailed statistical analysis demonstrates that “a ‘kinder and gentler’ form of colonial domination” existed in the missions of the Upper Plata “when compared to missions on other frontiers” (p. 7). Specifically, “an element of co-governance” between the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): v–vii.
Published: 01 August 2011
... initiatives on Chagas disease. She also has published a book on Carlos Chagas’s biography (Carlos Chagas, Scientist of Brazil, with Aline Lopes de Lacerda, Editora Fiocruz, 2009) and articles in the Social History of Medicine, História, Ciências, Saúde  –  Manguinhos, and Dynamis on the social...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2000) 80 (3): 463–502.
Published: 01 August 2000
... Kepner argued that the consoli- dation of the banana trade could be attributed largely to the “hurricanes, floods, droughts and plant disease,” that were capable of ruining small-scale growers who lacked the transnational production network maintained by...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2009) 89 (4): 571–572.
Published: 01 November 2009
..., and fears of epidemic disease led to quar- antines and other disruptions of commerce. Public health was therefore central to the Porfirian modernization project. Moreover, the Mexican Superior Health Council, which joined the American Public Health Association in 1890, came to act as an...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 771–773.
Published: 01 November 2016
... with a sophisticated understanding of the region, the people, the culture, local diseases, and the existing health-care systems who crucially were capable of producing a medical profile of the 30 villages that they visited while deaths continued to happen around them. The ability to create a clinical...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 516–517.
Published: 01 August 2014
... the biggest economic undertakings: an ambitious plan to lay 1,600 kilometers of track through a wilderness of dense forest and fever-ridden swampland, home to jaguars, snakes, swarms of disease-bearing mosquitoes, and a hostile indigenous population. Designed to open this wilderness, not to export...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 346–348.
Published: 01 May 2015
.... The author informs us that the children sacrificed to the rain god Tlaloc “all … presented metabolic and dental disease related to acute dietary deficiencies” (p. 191). However, she is not ready to conclude that this is evidence of their having been taken from distressed rural communities as prisoners...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 730–731.
Published: 01 November 2017
... evidence of ambiguity and diversity on all sides, from Spanish officials who trumpeted their “humanitarian” duty to cure disease through “Enlightenment science” while still infusing that notion with Christian overtones (and religious personnel) to the indigenous and mixed-race barbers, bleeders, and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 374–375.
Published: 01 May 2017
... already taken early protective measures in response to a report sent by the Spanish ambassador in Britain when the expedition was still under preparation. According to the sources, one may say that it was hunger, thirst, and disease that finally expelled the English from Hispaniola, but a great deal of...