1-20 of 1926 Search Results for

debt

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2003) 83 (3): 521–560.
Published: 01 August 2003
...Elizabeth Dore Debt Peonage in Granada, Nicaragua, 1870–1930: Labor in a Noncapitalist Transition Elizabeth Dore The rise of coffee cultivation was a watershed in Nicaraguan history. Prior to the 1880s, most land was common property; thereafter, land in coffee districts was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2004) 84 (2): 327–328.
Published: 01 May 2004
...Peter M. Beattie Blood and Debt: War and the Nation State in Latin America. By miguel angel centeno. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002. Map. Tables. Figures. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 329 pp. Cloth, $45.00. 2004 by Duke University Press 2004 Book Reviews...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2006) 86 (1): 194–195.
Published: 01 February 2006
...Bonnie D. Fors Bonds and Bondholders: British Investors and Mexico's Foreign Debt, 1824-1888 . By michael p. costeloe. Westport, CT: Praeger, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2003. Illustrations. Tables. Appendix. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xxii, 359 pp. Cloth, $69.95. 2006 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 576–578.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Graciela Márquez Politics, Markets, and Mexico's “London Debt,” 1823 – 1887 . By Salvucci Richard J. . New York : Cambridge University Press , 2009 . Illustrations. Maps. Tables. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index . xiii, 326 pp. Book Reviews General and Sources The Art...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 291–318.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., as this article argues, global demand could only remake social and economic relations within the parameters of entrenched local structures. In the Soconusco, the development and endurance of incentivized contracts as opposed to coercive debt peonage were the result of tapping into a dispersed and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 331–332.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Teresa Cribelli Inglorious Revolution: Political Institutions, Sovereign Debt, and Financial Underdevelopment in Imperial Brazil . By Summerhill William R. . Yale Series in Economic and Financial History . New Haven, CT : Yale University Press , 2015 . Illustrations. Figures. Tables...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2009) 89 (2): 253–283.
Published: 01 May 2009
...'s, mainly because the economic situation was not dire and the Treasury was able to finance its deficits through foreign debts due to the good performance of Argentine external sector. Nonetheless, Molina's proposal was passed by the Chamber of Deputies and therefore it could have been the first...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 369–371.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., historians have explored how the purpose and significance of borders have changed over time. The Limits of Liberty makes an important contribution to this scholarship. By excavating how native peoples, runaway slaves, and debt peons conceived of the US-Mexican border in the nineteenth century, James David...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 569–571.
Published: 01 August 2016
...Hernán Horna The local elites are prone to use nationalist banners against foreign capital. In reality, foreign capital allies itself with different local elites. When the Peruvian government in 1869 regarded the public debt as unmanageable, it granted to the company Dreyfus Frères et Cie...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2007) 87 (2): 327–352.
Published: 01 May 2007
...Rodney D. Anderson; Tamara Spike © 2007 by Duke University Press 2007 A decade-long project incurs many debts. We wish to thank the HAHR editors, Matt Childs, and Sarah Franklin for their close reading of this article in its various stages. The National Endowment for the Humanities...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 691–693.
Published: 01 November 2014
... merchants helped advance tribute payments, extend credit to the Maya, and arrange transportation of goods. The Maya were sold cotton thread and required to repay their tribute debt in cloth. They also bought mules, cattle, quetzal feathers, and other items that the alcalde mayor and his colleagues sold at...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 235–245.
Published: 01 May 2008
... paper we have explored the part of the story that is missing at present, namely the expenditure side, military or otherwise.14 As Marichal suggests, early modern states devoted about 80 –  90 percent of their expendi- ture to the army, navy, and war debts. In the late eighteenth century, during...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2003) 83 (4): 697–734.
Published: 01 November 2003
... highland Ecuador and focused on the particular issues facing comuneros and conciertos. The institu- tion of concertaje—an Ecuadoran version of debt servitude—was perceived as the fundamental cause of Indian misfortune. During the first half of the nine- teenth century, perhaps as many as half...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 512–514.
Published: 01 August 2015
... a group of Andean words with meanings important for church teaching on sins: huchallicu- (to sin, fornicate) and huauça - (to have “improper” sex, specifically between men); ranti- (to exchange or substitute), catu- (to exchange goods in a market), and manu- (debt, to be in debt); and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 572–574.
Published: 01 August 2016
... cotton. Caught between rising costs, a limited market, and the competition of centralist heavyweights such as Cayetano Rubio, whose Hércules factory in Querétaro could get all the cotton it needed, Antuñano fell deeply into debt. A French merchant in Puebla financed him through a straw party but broke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 552–553.
Published: 01 August 2018
... financial institutions to consolidate control and build new structures for collusion. Debt financing and corporate bond issues became more central than commerce trading, a shift that continued to be justified in the racialized and racist terms that supported neocolonial finance through the decades of its...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2005) 85 (2): 223–258.
Published: 01 May 2005
... include debts and credits. As Jones points out, debts and credits should cancel out over the whole of a society.24 Moreover, we cannot city over the second half of the nineteenth century, this assumption becomes increasingly problematic. 23. The assumption that 50 percent of households held...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 219–233.
Published: 01 May 2008
... borrowing. But promises by absolutists to repay loans were less cred- ible precisely because absolutists brooked little opposition to their authority to spend, debase the currency, and repudiate debt. Prone to impressments, confis- cations, and default, absolutists confronted low debt ceilings and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 122–123.
Published: 01 February 2018
... houses and included a large collection of silver utensils and a 62-volume library. The governor's intent was to pay off the priest's presumably few outstanding debts and then donate the remaining funds to the community. However, the claims that came from the villagers were extraordinary: years of unpaid...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 73–107.
Published: 01 February 2016
... that relied upon the coerced labor of one racialized section of the population. Q'eqchi’ and ladino indigenista efforts to promote free wage labor contrast sharply with historical accounts of indigenous and peasant negotiation of forced wage labor and debt peonage in Latin America. Beginning in the...