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cuauhtitlan

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1947) 27 (3): 520–522.
Published: 01 August 1947
...R. H. Barlow Códice Chimalpopoca. Anales de Cuauhtitlán y leyenda de los soles . Traducción directa del náhuatl por Velázquez Primo Feliciano . [ Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Historia .] ( México : Imprenta Universitaria , 1945 . Pp. xxi , 161 . Facsimilar...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (1): 130–131.
Published: 01 February 1994
... Cuauhtitlan” and the “Leyenda de los Soles.” The second section, which is not included in this edition, is a work in Spanish titled “Breve relación de los dioses y ritos de la gentilidad,” by Pedro Ponce de León, a seventeenth-century cleric. The most accessible previous edition was printed in Mexico in 1945...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1966) 46 (3): 350.
Published: 01 August 1966
..., Hidalgo, Puebla, Veracruz, Querétaro, Guanajuato, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas, Oaxaca, and Yucatán. More than one-half (33) of the total number of mayorazgos existed in Ciudad de México, while four others were located in the Estado de México in such areas as Chalco, Cuauhtitlan, and Texcoco. The colonial...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (3): 559–560.
Published: 01 August 1984
... into account. One of the most important, and constantly quoted, is that known as the Annals of Cuauhtitlan . It is almost superfluous to add that Frances Gillmor did not disregard the testimonies of chroniclers like Juan Bautista Pomar and Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl. For those who love historical...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (2): 296–297.
Published: 01 May 1997
... of advisers. A group of priests departs from Texcoco for Tenayuca, Coatepec, Cuauhtitlan, and Contlan; they arrive at a place marked by twin temples. Next, the chronicle depicts the advent of Nezahualcoyotl, king of Texcoco, and his son, Cipactli, in Xicotepec between 1438 and 1443. There are battle scenes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (3): 415–448.
Published: 01 August 2022
... , 3. 23. Peñafiel, Cantares en idioma mexicano , 5. 22. Olavarría y Ferrari, Crónica , 14. 21. Chavero, Quetzalcóatl , vi–vii. For the original ditty, see Ramírez, Anales de Cuauhtitlan , 20. 20. Chavero, Obras históricas , 236n1. 19. Chavero, México a través...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (3): 455–478.
Published: 01 August 1977
... experts, suspended work on the diversion channel of the Cuauhtitlan River which was designed to prevent water from flowing into the lakes of the basin of Mexico. The decision, one that he had no competence to make, resulted in a rise in water levels and a drop in Gelves popularity. The cabildo protested...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 5–39.
Published: 01 February 2012
... Ibid., chap. 6. 33 Below Tepotzotlán, the river carries 107 million cubic meters per year. Harold Wayne McBride, “Formative Ceramics and Prehistoric Settlement Patterns in the Cuauhtitlan Region, Mexico” (PhD diss., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, 1974), 33. 34 AGN Desagüe, vol. 12, exp...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2002) 82 (1): 33–68.
Published: 01 February 2002
... of the Tarascan; and “in the Mexican language the word Cuauhtitlán literally means ‘next to an eagle’ and as an historical place teaches us that the Aztecs in their pilgrimage stayed in this place for three years.” 80 For García Cubas, such names were a critical component to his own endeavors, begun in 1857...
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