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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (4): 708–709.
Published: 01 November 1994
...Allan Burns Sandstrom is at his best describing and itemizing the vital details of everyday existence—household possessions, the price fluctuations of corn and beans. He also gives a fine description of an indigenous work ethic. An example of his insight concerns the way people approach work...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (3): 429–430.
Published: 01 August 1992
...Susan Kellogg When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846 . By Gutiérrez Ramón A. . Stanford : Stanford University Press , 1991 . Notes. Bibliography. Index . xxxi , 424 pp. Cloth . $49.50 . Copyright 1992 by Duke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (3): 558–560.
Published: 01 August 1973
... in a Peasant Economy: The Maya Corn Farmers of Zinacantan . By Cancian Frank . Stanford, California , 1972 . Stanford University Press . Maps. Tables. Illustrations. Appendices. Bibliography. Index . Pp. vii , 208 . Cloth. $7.95. Copyright 1973 by Duke University Press 1973 Our knowledge...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1955) 35 (3): 425.
Published: 01 August 1955
...Henry J. Bruman Copyright 1955 by Duke University Press 1955 Indian Corn in Old America . By Weatherwax Paul . New York , 1954 . Macmillan . Illustrations. Maps. Bibliography. Index . Pp. ix , 253 . $7.50 . ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (4): 716–717.
Published: 01 November 2013
... decades of study and labor: Lewis’s first fieldwork stay in the community upon which she focuses was in 1992. Copyright 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 Chocolate and Corn Flour: History, Race, and Place in the Making of “Black” Mexico . By Lewis Laura A. . Durham, NC : Duke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1919) 2 (3): 398.
Published: 01 August 1919
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2021) 101 (2): 369–371.
Published: 01 May 2021
... in an ethnically stratified community under mestizo domination, which stifled Nahua attempts to obtain land for growing corn. Taggart connects to the insurgency's aims a phrase he encountered during the first stage of his fieldwork, prior to the rebellion: “working as one,” which expresses a Nahua value...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (3): 467–499.
Published: 01 August 2019
... import duties on crucial subsistence crops like corn, beans, and wheat. Although these measures appeared to have some success in containing inflation and relieving acute domestic shortages, the fact that they were based on incomplete or misleading regional agroclimatic information in the press...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (1): 135–146.
Published: 01 February 1984
... was 36.2 miles long for cotton cloth; 17.6 for coffee; 10.4 for cheese; 5.8 for bacon and tobacco; 4.1 for rice; 2.2 for beans; 1.2 for corn; and 0.8 for corn flour. 9 This reasoning assumes, of course, that alternative routes existed, that the cost of transportation over them was the same...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (2): 259–281.
Published: 01 May 1989
... per year within a system of crop rotation. In the case of Hacienda Puntiti, potatoes were generally harvested in November and wheat in May. Other crops grown included corn, barley, haba (broad bean), and alfalfa. Estancia Piusilla, located at a higher elevation, produced wheat, barley, oats, potato...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (2): 239–273.
Published: 01 May 1992
... quintal and cotton seed for $37 per ton. The hacienda determined which crops would be grown. At Mercedes, management refused after 1909 to provide fully irrigated land for corn, preferring cash crops such as wheat or cotton. Successive crop failures brought relations between the hacienda and its...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (3): 501–534.
Published: 01 August 2006
..., the skills associated with their gender and ethnicity provided them both independence and an income that bested Mayan men’s earnings. Examining the history of Mayan molenderas (corn grinders and tortilla makers) reveals the nuanced workings of micropower within systems of domination. More broadly...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (3): 496–521.
Published: 01 August 1975
... supported by village resources, many families emigrated to Mexico City. Others remained in the Chalco villages, vainly seeking subsistence by growing corn in their house lots, while scraping out a supplemental income by fermenting pulque from wild maguey cactus and collecting firewood. Such efforts brought...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (4): 891–892.
Published: 01 November 1991
...Rosemarljn Hoefte The Dutch in the Caribbean and in Suriname 1791/5–1942 . By Goalinga Cornelis C. . Assen, Netherlands : Van Gorcum , 1990 . Illustrations. Maps. Tables. Appendixes. Notes. Bibliography. Index . xiii , 812 pp. Cloth . Copyright 1991 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (2): 350.
Published: 01 May 1968
...Thomas Lynch Cultura diaguita chilena y cultura de El Molle . By Cornely F. L. . Santiago , 1966 . Editorial del Pacífico . Illustrations. Maps. Appendix. Bibliography . Pp. 223 . Paper. $2.00 . Copyright 1968 by Duke University Press 1968 Two fundamental monographs...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1969) 49 (3): 520–522.
Published: 01 August 1969
..., with the domestication of the great staple, corn, taking place in the Puebla region not long after 5,000 B.C. In this search for what Robert J. Braidwood has called the “Great Transition,” the Tehuacán excavations have been crucial. From 1960 to 1964 MacNeish led a project which was truly multidisciplinary...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (1): 113–115.
Published: 01 February 1967
... of corn and beans, ninety-five percent of the diet of the eastern ladino is confined to corn and beans. Valuable information is provided about the arts and costs of weaving, a skill for which the highland Indian population is noted, and a detailed inventory is given of the clothing worn by men, women...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (1): 148–150.
Published: 01 February 2006
... by Arnold Bauer. He compares the cultivation and processing of European cereals with maize and observes that while corn requires less time and energy to cultivate than wheat, oats, or barley, it is much more time consuming to process. Tortilla production fell to women and required five to six hours per day...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (1): 196–197.
Published: 01 February 2019
... family, and to the viability of a way of life that he once believed was immutable” (p. 40). In Moreno's own words from 1951, “Many go illegally to that Promised Land in search of the Dollar and they give more importance to it than to tending the corn in their own country. Compared to the Dollar...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (2): 211–243.
Published: 01 May 1997
... cultivated corn for their subsistence needs, many engaged in other economic activities. Some made and sold pottery and blankets, others carried cotton from the coast, and still others raised sheep. Cantel’s most important regional economic niche, however, was to supply wheat and wood to the surrounding...