1-20 of 564 Search Results for

conscript

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 197–199.
Published: 01 February 2019
... . Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019 From 1973 to 1990, approximately 370,000 Chilean men performed compulsory military service during the dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet. Decades later, groups of these ex-conscripts petitioned the state for unpaid pension contributions as well as...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 738–739.
Published: 01 November 2018
... barracks developed its own language, a cant largely indecipherable to officers that wed a community of conscripts from various regions who may not otherwise have shared a common tongue” (p. 210). In theory officers acted as teachers, but in Neufeld's telling the training routine was so brutal that one...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 169–170.
Published: 01 February 2019
... a transnational, comparative approach, he demonstrates that Mexicans did, in fact, have a cohesive national identity. Nonetheless, a number of unique social and economic challenges plagued the Mexican military. Unlike in the United States, conscription into the army in Mexico could send a soldier's...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 299–334.
Published: 01 May 2015
... mercilessness of the trenches.” 3 Citing these very narratives as evidence, Herbert Klein asserted in 1969 that “conscription of Indians” was “universal,” thus setting the still-prevailing historical narrative as to the composition of the rank and file. 4 Despite a wave of promising new research on...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 158–159.
Published: 01 February 2018
... Salamanca favored war at least in part as a way to divert popular anger in the midst of the Depression. War in the name of national honor offered a useful chauvinist distraction as well as a chance to repress leftists, who were conscripted and sent to the front lines. Thus, the book's claim for the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 319–320.
Published: 01 May 2018
... liberal vocabulary designed “to gain the approval of those who exercised power” (p. 250). Yet when it came to fiscal and military exactions, Misantla's inhabitants resisted the exigencies of the postcolonial state, for instance by going into hiding when threatened with military conscription. Ducey thus...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 163–165.
Published: 01 February 2017
... sociopolitical context of evolving fragmentation made formal military units reliably unstable. They were often products of forced conscription, and desertion and lack of cohesion eroded their ranks. The author thus emphasizes the need to also trace the dynamics of less formal military units—militias, montoneras...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 333–335.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of violence through processes that began in the nineteenth century but accelerated after 1930. He attributes this to the politicization of violence and to technologies of governance that allowed the state to better fix its citizens—through photography, railroads, general conscription, and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 February 2015
... in the United States. He connects his discussion of the relatively dismal treatment that several hundred South Texas Mexicans received as conscripts in the Confederate army to the far wider reluctance of many Mexican American and Anglo-American border residents to secede or support the Confederate...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2004) 84 (1): 83–112.
Published: 01 February 2004
... identities into stable images of middle-class urbanity. Figure 11. A balance of gender and generation. Can the Subaltern Be Seen? 97 Figure 12. The K’iche’ cabildo conscripted an indigenous...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2007) 87 (4): 693–726.
Published: 01 November 2007
.... 49. “Negros Africanos,” El Entierro del Carnaval, Feb. 11, 1883, 2. Forced conscription of Afro-Uruguayan men was the government action most frequently protested by the black press. See, for example, “El pasado y el presente,” La Conservación, Aug. 11, 1872, 1; “Decíamos ayer El Periódico...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2011) 91 (4): 601–631.
Published: 01 November 2011
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 378–380.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 380–382.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 383–384.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 384–385.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 385–387.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 353–354.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 354–355.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 356–357.
Published: 01 May 2010