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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2013) 93 (3): 526–528.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Robert Karl Between the Guerrillas and the State: The Cocalero Movement, Citizenship, and Identity in the Colombian Amazon . By Ramírez María Clemencia . Translated by Klatt Andy . Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2011 . Illustrations. Maps. Tables. Appendixes. Notes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2013) 93 (1): 132–133.
Published: 01 February 2013
...Maurice P. Brungardt Salt and the Colombian State: Local Society and Regional Monopoly in Boyacá, 1821–1900 . By Rosenthal Joshua M. . Pitt Latin American Series . Pittsburgh, PA : University of Pittsburgh Press , 2012 . Illustrations. Maps. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 582–584.
Published: 01 August 2006
...Mary Roldán My Life as a Colombian Revolutionary: Reflections of a Former Guerrillera . By maria eugenia vásquez perdomo. Translated by lorena terando. Voices of Latin American Life. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2005. Photographs. Plates. Notes. Index. xxxvi, 266 pp. Cloth, $68.50...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 340–341.
Published: 01 May 2014
... the Colombian context but also in the global imaginary. It is this interest in dealing with the major currents of theory, from cultural criticism in the art world and literary psychoanalytic and feminist theory to cultural studies, that somehow diminishes the historical relevance of Martin's...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 407–438.
Published: 01 August 2018
...Lina Del Castillo Abstract When recognition of independence lay tantalizingly out of reach, officials of the first Colombian republic devoted funds and expertise toward hiring French-trained naturalists for an expedition. These officials' plan to gain diplomatic recognition of Colombia through...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 71–102.
Published: 01 February 2015
...Lina Britto Abstract This essay, based in large part on local oral history, uncovers the lived experience of the rural and urban popular sectors who participated in the 1970s marijuana boom along the northernmost section of the Colombian Caribbean coast. In particular, the piece narrates how the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2014) 94 (1): 77–105.
Published: 01 February 2014
...Catalina Muñoz This article examines the cultural programs developed by reformist intellectuals and artists working for the Colombian government during the period known as the Liberal Republic (1930-1946). It explores the implementation of two music programs in particular, the orfeones obreros and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 423–456.
Published: 01 August 2017
... such were able to change market conditions and make specific demands regarding the quality of imported products intended for their consumption. By so doing, the article questions the premise that because of their poverty Colombian popular classes were always drawn to buying cheaper imported goods and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2013) 93 (3): 347–376.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Nancy P. Appelbaum The mid-nineteenth-century Colombian Chorographic Commission drew on geology, archaeology, and history to project a patriotic past onto the Andean landscape of the young republic then known as New Granada. This geographic expedition, led initially by Agustín Codazzi and Manuel...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 134–136.
Published: 01 February 2018
... historical tool. Dueñas-Vargas highlights these societal shifts using the lives of prominent Colombians. For example, the cold and formal traditional marriage and the militaristic masculinity of the independence era were characterized by Tomás Cipriano de Mosquera. After 1850, those tendencies gave way...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 756–758.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Press 2016 This history of Colombian beauty and beauty pageants extends its analysis beyond the contemporary televised form of the pageant to consider the historical basis of its morphology. Michael Edward Stanfield argues that Colombian beauty serves an ameliorating purpose alongside a masculine...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 722–724.
Published: 01 November 2014
... book recounts the history of the last half century in Colombia, focusing on the violent contention between the Colombian state, Marxist-inspired guerrillas, and right-wing paramilitary forces. Author Marco Palacios, a Colombian historian now based at the Colegio de México, is at pains to place his...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2019) 99 (3): 559–561.
Published: 01 August 2019
... . Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019 Between 1810 and 1824, all the Spanish American provinces, except Cuba and Puerto Rico, went through turbulent periods of war ending in independence from the Spanish empire. In La restauración en la Nueva Granada (1815–1819) , Colombian historian Daniel...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 361–363.
Published: 01 May 2015
... experience of postemancipation informed, and was informed by, a series of transnational events happening across the Americas and the Atlantic. This is important for two reasons. First, by locating the Colombian Caribbean coast in a transnational geopolitical framework, we have an excellent opportunity to see...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2019) 99 (3): 566–568.
Published: 01 August 2019
... their descendants appropriated the tropical rain forest to achieve the highest levels of autonomy of almost anywhere in the enslaved Americas, Leal argues (p. 5). In the decades after abolition, Afro-Colombians maintained their hard-won autonomy by retaining control over the extraction of vegetable...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 570–572.
Published: 01 August 2017
... synthesizes the relevant literature without incorporating archival sources or fieldwork. The main idea is that “the powerful external force of illegal drug money” made the Colombian state unable to enforce its law or defend its people (pp. 16–17). The seeds of the “narcotics nightmare” are in what Henderson...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 175–177.
Published: 01 February 2016
... Chile, the majority of the new arrivals were well educated, knew English and French, and brought a spirit of innovation and prosperity. By 1892, 6 German companies with 34 ships were convoying cargo and passengers along the Magdalena River while others were transporting to Europe boatloads of Colombian...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 548–550.
Published: 01 August 2017
...Jordana Dym Historian Nancy Appelbaum's meticulous study follows the expedition into and through a half dozen Colombian provinces. Via a close reading of textual and visual materials produced by the commission's members, she offers insight into the ups and downs of nineteenth-century fieldwork...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 708–709.
Published: 01 November 2015
... by Duke University Press 2015 In the mid-2000s, when authorities began to find bodies with hands bound, eyes blindfolded, and signs of torture dumped along Mexican border states, the media coined the term Colombianization to refer to the incapacity of the federal state to control extensive...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2004) 84 (2): 277–314.
Published: 01 May 2004
... point, how did Afro-Colombians and other lower-class people transform elite politi- cal organizations into “their party”? In the Cauca, Afro-Colombians actively negotiated, bargained, and came to identify with the Liberal Party, seeing it as a means to enter the nation’s public, political...