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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): 225–266.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Steven C. Topik 2000 by Duke University Press 2000 HAHR 80.2_03.topik.JO 4/13/00 4:45 PM Page 225 Coffee Anyone? Recent Research on Latin American Coffee Societies Steven C. Topik The recent explosion of the popularity of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2005) 85 (2): 259–282.
Published: 01 May 2005
...Renato Leite Marcondes 2005 by Duke University Press 2005 Small and Medium Slaveholdings in the Coffee Economy of the Vale do Paraíba, Province of São Paulo Renato Leite Marcondes Worldwide growth in demand for coffee during the nineteenth century led to increased production in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2005) 85 (2): 345–346.
Published: 01 May 2005
...Mario Samper K. Cultivating Coffee: The Farmers of Carazo, Nicaragua,1880–1930. By julie a. charlip. Research in International Studies, Latin America, no. 39. Athens: Ohio University Press,2003. Maps. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 288 pp. Paper,$28.00. 2005 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 514–515.
Published: 01 August 2014
...Susie S. Porter Working Women, Entrepreneurs, and the Mexican Revolution: The Coffee Culture of Córdoba, Veracruz . By Fowler-salamini Heather . The Mexican Experience . Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press , 2013 . Photographs. Maps. Figures. Tables. Notes. Glossary. Bibliography...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 291–318.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Casey Marina Lurtz Abstract Between 1870 and 1920, the department of the Soconusco in Chiapas, Mexico, became the country's largest exporter of coffee to global markets. The expansion of this economy required the mobilization of an ever larger workforce in the service of international commerce. Yet...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 73–107.
Published: 01 February 2016
...Julie Gibbings Abstract In the midst of Guatemala's nineteenth-century coffee boom, a frost struck the department of Alta Verapaz, destroying coffee harvests and catalyzing a debate over the “slavery” of mandamiento (forced wage labor). At the heart of these disputes was the problem of how to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2000) 80 (2): v–vi.
Published: 01 May 2000
... Allen Wells, of The Second Conquest of Latin America: Coffee, Henequen, and Oil during the Export Boom, 1850–1930 (1998); and editor, with David A. Smith and Dorothy J. Solinger, of States and Sovereignty in the Global Economy (1999). He is currently editing a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 501–534.
Published: 01 August 2006
... molenderas (corn grinders and tortilla makers) reveals the nuanced work- ings of micropower within systems of domination. More broadly, the diverse experiences of Mayan females who migrated to the coast to work in the coffee I am grateful to Ixk’at, Ixch’onïk, and Ixkawoq for their assistance in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2003) 83 (3): 521–560.
Published: 01 August 2003
...Elizabeth Dore Debt Peonage in Granada, Nicaragua, 1870–1930: Labor in a Noncapitalist Transition Elizabeth Dore The rise of coffee cultivation was a watershed in Nicaraguan history. Prior to the 1880s, most land was common property; thereafter, land in coffee districts was...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2006) 86 (2): 205–245.
Published: 01 May 2006
... August 19, 1906, a Sunday. Despite a sluggish coffee market and low prices, 11,623 sacks of beans entered Rio de Janeiro that day. At the Chacrinha, the city’s coffee exchange, wholesale trading was moderate, because the coffee factors insisted on a higher price and the buyers would not budge.1...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 699–700.
Published: 01 November 2014
... on opposite sides. The same problems that affected sugar production in the context of a general crisis affected attempts at economic diversification. Coffee plantations faced problems quite similar to those faced by sugar plantations regarding their inability to improve slaves' health and achieve a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2001) 81 (2): 309–342.
Published: 01 May 2001
... America, . . . the formation of subjects at the conjunction of a variety of histor- ical processes, . . . (from) the Venezuelan Andes in the nineteenth century, . . . to the comparative history of coffee producing regions in Latin America, . . . to the comparative...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 427–429.
Published: 01 August 2006
... campaigns in the cities. Finally, in “Empowered through Labor and Buttressing Their Communi- ties: Mayan Women and Coastal Migration, 1875 – 1965,” David Carey Jr. pro- vides new insight into the workings of Guatemala’s coffee economy through his analysis of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 384–386.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Herbert S. Klein While Asian and American products were known in Europe from the sixteenth century, it was only in the seventeenth century that Chinese tea, American and Asian coffee and sugar, and American tobacco and chocolate began to appear in large quantities on the European market. How to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 760–761.
Published: 01 November 2002
...Ben Fallaw 2002 by Duke University Press 2002 Obituaries Michael F. Jiménez (1948–2001) Michael Jiménez was passionate about many things: the coffee lands and, above them, the high sabana of Colombia where he grew up; issues of social justice; the liberating potential of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 762–763.
Published: 01 November 2002
...Magnus Mörner; Stuart B. Schwartz 2002 by Duke University Press 2002 Obituaries Michael F. Jiménez (1948–2001) Michael Jiménez was passionate about many things: the coffee lands and, above them, the high sabana of Colombia where he grew up; issues of social justice; the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 755–759.
Published: 01 November 2002
...Catherine Legrand 2002 by Duke University Press 2002 Obituaries Michael F. Jiménez (1948–2001) Michael Jiménez was passionate about many things: the coffee lands and, above them, the high sabana of Colombia where he grew up; issues of social justice; the liberating...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2004) 84 (2): 191–238.
Published: 01 May 2004
... causes of the revolt. In 1927, following six years of dramatic expansion, coffee prices and export volumes began to decline. This slump accelerated over the next few years, a devastating blow to an economy dependent on coffee exports. The west- ern part of the country, which was hardest hit, became...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 182–184.
Published: 01 February 2016
... country's main coffee-producing areas and shared other similarities, they could not have differed more in the aftermath of the revolution. The Sierra Maestra and the Sierra del Cristal in Oriente came to symbolize early on the revolution's promise, while the mountains of Escambray became synonymous with...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 680–681.
Published: 01 November 2015
... diverse, but it is small in numbers relative to the receiving population. The most important destination for new arrivals, particularly relative to the preimmigration population, was the coffee sector of São Paulo. While the contractual burden of a few hundred sharecroppers in the 1850s is explored in...