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census

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2001) 81 (3-4): 774–775.
Published: 01 November 2001
...Elaine C. Lacy Changing Race: Latinos, the Census, and the History of Ethnicity in the United States. By clara e. rodríguez. Critical America Series. New York: New York University Press, 2000. Tables. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xv, 282 pp. Cloth, $55.oo. Paper, $19.00. 2001 by...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2007) 87 (2): 327–352.
Published: 01 May 2007
..., Division of Preservation and Access, has generously supported this project, as have the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of History of Florida State University. Without that support, this project would not have been possible. The Guadalajara Census Project is a true collective enterprise of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2007) 87 (2): 353–362.
Published: 01 May 2007
... of Lima was undertaken. The empadronadores (census takers) approached the task systematically, enumerating the population accord- ing to existing administrative districts — and not according to church parishes, as had earlier censuses. As they moved methodically along, the interviewers noted...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2007) 87 (3): 537–570.
Published: 01 August 2007
... living standards, especially in the United States. By debating the categories used and the policies to be pursued in censuses’ aftermath, citizens around the world have used statistics to “exercise and uphold their rights.”16 The 1930 agrarian census in Mexico took place at a time of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2009) 89 (3): 435–470.
Published: 01 August 2009
... from the questions or categories that appeared on census questionnaires. The first general census of Brazil, in 1872, included a “color” query. But “color” was omitted from census forms in 1900 and 1920. Prior accounts of the history of racial classification in Brazil’s censuses have speculated...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 635–667.
Published: 01 November 2018
... stressed, the Relación was ad hoc and devoid of routinization, unlike, say, the rote monastic censuses of imperial China: there had never been such a census in Mexico, at least not since the colonial period. 70 Registrants, moreover, were self-selecting: their replies mattered as elective politico...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2004) 84 (4): 619–660.
Published: 01 November 2004
... fragments from an 1855 census to investigate urban households in Salvador, and Mott’s study dealing with ranching areas in the backlands of Piauí. Also see nn. 7 and 8 below. 7. A few studies have used manuscript censuses to discuss household size, composition, etc. in the sugar-producing areas of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 529–530.
Published: 01 August 2018
... 1821 and 1822 city censuses as coded in the Guadalajara Census Project and corroborating the patterns that she finds with similar pairings of censuses from 1811 and 1813 as well as 1839 and 1842. Whereas most scholars studying demographic patterns have relied on aggregate data—that is, averages drawn...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 605–606.
Published: 01 August 2016
... Latina/Latino studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, argues that “Mexican Americans identify as ‘white’ on the census not because they are accepted as white or even because they see themselves as white. Rather, by reframing the borders of whiteness to include them, Mexican Americans...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2007) 87 (2): 219–220.
Published: 01 May 2007
... filmmakers’ cinematic strategies and his counter-readings of melodrama informed by feminist film analysis. In our archival section, Rodney Anderson and Tamara Spike describe the Guadalajara Census Project (1791 – 1930). This hefty project — begun in the early 1990s and now available in the first...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 369–371.
Published: 01 May 2018
... classified as Latino/a,” a term that, like Latin America , Tenorio-Trillo does not much like (p. 77). According to the US Census Bureau, 19 percent of the US population currently identifies as Latino or Hispanic; the bureau projects that that percentage will rise to 29 percent in 2060. In contrast to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 772–773.
Published: 01 November 2018
...,” or when synchronicity is “the technical desire to present a diversity of figures and motives under a unified representation” (pp. 87, 30, 7). (Either time or Carl Jung is dead, it seems.) At other times it really does matter, as when the modern census defines respondents racially (and as “creole...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2007) 87 (3): 431–432.
Published: 01 August 2007
... led various elite factions to curtail popular activism in the interests of order and greater elite control. Finally, in “The 1930 Agrarian Census in Mexico: Agronomists, Middle Politics, and the Negotiation of Data Collection,” Michael Ervin takes on a cen­ tral question in the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2000) 80 (4): 913–942.
Published: 01 November 2000
...). Older studies based on these unpublished manuscript census include among others, the works of Francisco Vidal Luna, Minas Gerais, escravos e senhores: Análise da estrutura populacional e econômica de alguns centros mineratórios, 1718–1804 (São Paulo...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2013) 93 (3): 411–449.
Published: 01 August 2013
... whiteness in Latin America, Mara Loveman analyzed the region’s 45 racial censuses from 1850 to 1950, a period when race was based on enumerator observations.8 She found through census documentation in sev- eral countries that racial divisions were treated as “self-­evident” and solid, stable, and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2008) 88 (1): 71–106.
Published: 01 February 2008
... refuse to acknowledge the existence of the nonwhite popula- tion, for instance by excluding racial categories from the national censuses and from public discourse.16 In the preliminary study of the 1895 national census, the census officers explained that they decided not to account for race because...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 564–565.
Published: 01 August 2017
... uses official correspondence, administrative reports, and census records to track the disputes between local and national authorities and the missionaries. However, we do not hear Indian voices. As a result, the reader is left to wonder how Indians from Guarayos reacted to secularization. How did they...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 528–529.
Published: 01 August 2018
... statistics on demographics from the census and data drawn from careful analysis of postmortem estate inventories from the period. His arguments reflect a clear understanding of the role of inheritance and family law in the experience of minors left without fathers. He also uses cartoons and other...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 153–154.
Published: 01 February 2019
... markets, most of it archaeological, to fill in what the Codex Mendoza fails to tell us: how foodstuffs and goods were produced in the Basin of Mexico, and how they moved from producers to consumers. Kenneth Hirth, Sarah Imfeld, and Colin Hirth examine a 1560 tribute census to understand who long-distance...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 177–178.
Published: 01 February 2019
... and politics, relies on the census data of 1845 and 1890 and focuses on Tehuantepec and Juchitán. Reina demonstrates the transformations in occupations and the burgeoning urban landscape. The author's discussion of the assault by neoliberal reforms on the agricultural and fishing occupations of...