1-20 of 1426 Search Results for

cardena

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 577–578.
Published: 01 August 2012
...Thomas Rath Populism in Twentieth Century Mexico: The Presidencies of Lázaro Cárdenas and Luis Echeverría . Edited by Kiddle Amelia Muñoz María L. O. . Foreword by Cárdenas Cuauhtémoc . Tucson : University of Arizona Press , 2010 . Photographs. Notes. Bibliography. Index...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 763–765.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Elizabeth O'Brien Revolutionary Ideology and Political Destiny in Mexico, 1928–1934: Lázaro Cárdenas and Adalberto Tejeda . By Eitan Ginzberg . Eastbourne, UK : Sussex Academic Press , 2015 . Photographs. Maps. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiv, 276 pp. Paper , $39.95...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 386–388.
Published: 01 May 2019
... “ artesanías offered a secularized indigenous identity in the context of Michoacán's religious tensions following the Cristeros Rebellion” (p. 167). This interpretation certainly aligns with evidence that suggests that Cárdenas sought to use artesanías for that purpose but does not indicate how this strategy...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 353–354.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Aaron W. Navarro Mexico's Relations with Latin America during the Cárdenas Era . By Kiddle Amelia M. . Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press , 2016 . Photographs. Figures. Tables. Appendixes. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xvii, 307 pp. Cloth , $55.00 . Copyright © 2018 by...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 73–106.
Published: 01 February 2012
...Christopher R. Boyer; Emily Wakild This article reinterprets the pivotal presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas of Mexico, (1934–40) through the prism of environmental history. The Cárdenas administration is best known for its use of land reform, creation of mass organizations, and the nationalization of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 194–196.
Published: 01 February 2019
... campaign to revitalize southern agricultural production while relieving the social and economic conditions of local sharecroppers. In Mexico, President Lázaro Cárdenas reignited radical agrarianism, which brought expropriations of large landholdings and redistribution of 50 million acres of land, a vast...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 189–191.
Published: 01 February 2017
... largely abandoned the Spanish Republic to the depredations of the Nationalist insurrection backed by Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini, the Lázaro Cárdenas administration offered political, financial, symbolic, and military assistance to the embattled Republicans. Ojeda Revah suggests that Mexico's aid...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 237–269.
Published: 01 May 2014
... fiscal administration. A focus on the liquor tax, then, suggests that the logic of neopatrimonial state formation in Venezuela was not driven by oil alone. Cárdenas's attack on tax farming concluded with a sharp contrast between fiscal modernity and backwardness: “None of the national administrations...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 761–763.
Published: 01 November 2016
... intelligence services. Students were a special nuisance to the new president, who opened Congress in 1966 by saying that “adolescence . . . does [not] grant immunity from the law” (p. 170). The challenging militancy of Cárdenas in the wake of 1959 became an outright provocation to communist subversion by 1965...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 376–377.
Published: 01 May 2019
... especially benefited from these earliest projects. The next chapter shows that during the 1934–40 presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas, the well-placed found themselves less likely to prevent eminent domain seizures of their land for roadways. As those familiar with Mexican history might expect, construction...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 558–560.
Published: 01 August 2017
... management: chummy with presidents from Lázaro Cárdenas to Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, leading light of the Academia Mexicana de la Lengua, owner of a publishing house and Librerías de Cristal, president of the ballet, director of the National Commission for Free Textbooks, eventually a senator. In his writings he...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 743–745.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Felipe Arturo Ávila Espinosa Actores y cambio social en la Revolución mexicana . Edited by García Nicolás Cárdenas and Manzo Enrique Guerra . Mexico City : Itaca / UAM Xochimilco , 2014 . Maps. Table. Notes. Bibliographies. Index. 255 pp. Paper , $21.95 . Copyright © 2017 by...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2002) 82 (4): 645–684.
Published: 01 November 2002
... Mexico such as Figueroa of Guerrero, who used alliances with national revolutionary figures to maintain their hold over petty cacicazgos and expand their own economic horizons.28 Unfortu- nately for the Solíses, President Lázaro Cárdenas’s ambitious reforms, aimed at liquidating regional political...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 370–371.
Published: 01 May 2015
... to create an administration of individuals not allied with Plutarco Elías Calles or even Lázaro Cárdenas while sidestepping the swashbuckling public behavior of his brother, Maximino. This is an intelligent narrative, buttressed by domestic and international sources. In the same deliberate, well...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 1–3.
Published: 01 February 2012
... policy fit into postrevolutionary efforts to remake Mexican soci- ety, polity, and economy. They argue that, in formulating and implementing its vision of “social landscaping,” the Cárdenas administration was much more attentive to environmental concerns than its Depression-­era counterparts in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 41–71.
Published: 01 February 2012
... breadbasket for the growing metropolis. Where the land was not farmed, trees and shrubs would be planted to fix the soil. Armed revolution and the recalci- trant soil frustrated Madero’s vision for the 27,000- hectare lakebed. However, subsequent revolutionary presidents, most notably Lázaro Cárdenas...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2000) 80 (3): 565–568.
Published: 01 August 2000
... also detect in all of his work a deep respect for Mexico and its Hispanic culture and colonial institutions, which, I believe, grew out of his early field experience in the heady years of Lázaro Cárdenas. As a young man of 26, he explored the municipal, parish and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 750–752.
Published: 01 November 2017
... impressive number of interviews. McCormick employs three different approaches to analyze the interlocking relationships between agrarian protest and emerging authoritarianism. More than three-quarters of the book examines how President Lázaro Cárdenas and his successors followed contradictory strategies...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 767–768.
Published: 01 November 2017
... Hemisphere, something that Amelia Kiddle's essay on Lázaro Cárdenas's diplomatic outreach to Latin America highlights. In these essays, Mexico possesses a powerful, unique generation of diplomats who, by acting as foreign policy professionals in the 1930s, reached beyond the concepts offered by hemispheric...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2007) 87 (3): 431–432.
Published: 01 August 2007
... Asad, Ervin considers statistics to be instruments of domination, but he also stresses their potential for empowerment; the census became a critical tool in the renewal and radicalization of land distribution under the governments of Abelardo Rodríguez and Lázaro Cárdenas (1933–40). Ervin...