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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2012) 92 (4): 637–668.
Published: 01 November 2012
...Claudia Kedar Argentina joined the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank) in 1956—ten years later than all other American nations and only one year after President Juan Perón’s overthrow. This fact has led scholars to conclude...
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Published: 01 May 2017
Figure 2. Trapicheros by gender and amount of transactions at the Bank of San Carlos, 1762. Source : “Libro donde se sientan los marcos que se traen al rescate de los trapicheros de esta rivera,” 1761–64, AHP, BSC 313. Figure 2. Trapicheros by gender and amount of transactions at the Bank of More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2003) 83 (1): 190–192.
Published: 01 February 2003
...David Denslow Banking and Economic Development: Brazil, 1889–1930. By gail d. triner. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000. Map. Tables. Figures. Appendixes. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xv, 333 pp. Cloth,$59.95. 2003 by Duke University Press 2003 Book Reviews General Che Guevara, Paulo...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 223–256.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... The decisive impulse for the Misicuni dam project came from a broad democratic alliance of Cochabambinos that pressured the Bolivian state, international development banks, and contractors. This alternative history of vernacular modernism, or cross-class efforts to promote, participate in, and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2018) 98 (3): 552–553.
Published: 01 August 2018
... imperial banking, Peter James Hudson argues that finance capitalism and racial capitalism arose together through the actions of bankers seeking to compete on the international banking scene. Hudson traces the establishment of US banks through the Caribbean and beyond from the late 1800s and shows how...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 140–142.
Published: 01 February 2019
... University Press 2019 Andrew K. Frank's monograph is a remarkable study of the five eras of human occupation of the Miami River's north bank before the 1896 inception of the city of Miami. The book's main goal, as the author himself states, is to provide the city “with a sense of its history that has...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2012) 92 (4): 599–601.
Published: 01 November 2012
... a “Third Way” between the capitalist and Communist blocs. In later years, Perón presented himself as a firm and consistent opponent of the Bretton Woods system and its key institutions, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Look- ing more closely at his government’s relationship...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 362–363.
Published: 01 May 2018
... country, obtain a near monopoly on movie theaters, dominate the production of films, and build the largest bank. For ten years at least in the 1950s and 1960s, he was reputedly the richest man in Mexico. He reached these pinnacles despite strict governmental restrictions on the business activities of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 684–686.
Published: 01 November 2015
... landscape” (pp. 435–36). This project, he argues, expanded the core area of the city by adding not only the formerly peripheral Mapocho and its banks but also large areas on the north side of the river. Much as Benjamín Vicuña Mackenna had brought the rocky Cerro Santa Lucía into the east side of the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2004) 84 (4): 701–716.
Published: 01 November 2004
... government agencies or taken directly from the primary Brazilian producing institutions. In some cases, secondary agencies such as the UN’s FAO (Food and Agricultural Organiza- tion) provide more detailed information than Brazilian governmental sources. But in some cases, as with the World Bank and some...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2012) 92 (4): v–vi.
Published: 01 November 2012
... teaching interests include the history of the IMF and the World Bank and their interactions with their Latin American member states, the history of economic globalization, US – Latin American relations, contemporary Argentina, and multilateralism. Her book The International Monetary Fund and Latin...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 512–514.
Published: 01 August 2014
... communities to establish their own consumer and banking cooperatives, theaters, and public schools. Whether this dramatic improvement of working and living conditions represented a real revolution for textile workers is open to debate, for it is premised here on a rather narrow interpretation of the social...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2001) 81 (1): 89–134.
Published: 01 February 2001
... money and time), the comparative rarity of credit advances against commodities, the absence of a commer- cial banking system . . . and the omnipresence of numerous petty middle- men with vested interests in the traditional structure of trade. Each cell...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 303–305.
Published: 01 May 2014
... everlasting good fortune, opted in 1952 to leave government service — and, indeed, the United States — to take up a position with the World Bank as a development adviser to the Colombian government. The rest is history, as it were. The applied work that Hirschman conducted in Colombia in the mid-1950s allowed...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 331–332.
Published: 01 May 2018
... in financial stagnation. Politicians, not markets, determined the merits of new businesses based on their perceived benefit to the greater social good. Political cronyism limited financial innovation to institutions malleable to the state's interests, as the forced merger of the bank of investor...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 336–337.
Published: 01 May 2018
... industrial and banking sectors marked the demise of the regime. During the process of democratization, policies of social inclusion coupled with the sharp rise in inflation initially provoked a political crisis that was overcome with Cardoso's economic stabilization plan and an expansion of social programs...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 506–508.
Published: 01 August 2014
..., rural commerce, public financing and banking, immigration, daily life and sociability, workers and the labor movement, provincial cities, and the two political parties that dominated in the period, the Radicals and the Conservatives. Just as the rule of Juan Manuel de Rosas and the struggle for national...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 517–519.
Published: 01 August 2014
... culture and currency becomes visible again when the National Bank of Colombia picks none other than Silva to illustrate its 5,000-peso note in 1996, the 100th anniversary of his death. The poet's bearded, slightly wistful visage is featured on the front; on the back, an urn on which one of his more famous...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 754–755.
Published: 01 November 2017
... of the 1980s and 1990s that precipitously dropped living standards and pauperized millions of Mexicans. If José López Portillo's “last gasp” of revolutionary nationalism in September 1982, when he nationalized Mexican banks (and directly linked his act to the 1938 Cardenista oil expropriation...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 318–319.
Published: 01 May 2014
... how the inhabitants of New Spain, from the poorest to the wealthiest, financed purchases and various projects. A significant observation it offers is how the use of credit was shaped by the absence of both banks and paper money as well as by ecclesiastic restrictions on usury. Other points of interest...