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bahamian

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (2): 379–381.
Published: 01 May 2000
... tables. As with volume one, the absence of a bibliography is but a minor frustration in a work that the authors can be proud of. They have provided the Bahamian people with a superb and eminently accessibly account of their past and its legacy, and have set a new standard for scholarship chronicling the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (4): 702–703.
Published: 01 November 1993
...’ stated objective is to write a social history “to give recognition to ordinary Bahamians and to tell the story of their long struggle for self-realization against those same elites to whom their history has hitherto belonged” (p. xx). To a large degree, they succeed. The book is divided into three...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (3): 427–428.
Published: 01 August 1964
...Thelma Peters While Mr. Craton made good use of his Nassau and London sources it is to be regretted that he did not dig into American archives. The bonds between Americans and Bahamians have been strong if somewhat intermittent. Perhaps he did not know that the Boston Gazette would have given...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 193–194.
Published: 01 February 2011
... elsewhere, since the exportation of tobacco leaf was not adversely affected by the island’s political instability. Tinajero meticulously describes the successful establishment of the Cuban cigar business in Key West, Florida, a crossroads of peoples and cultures (e.g., Cuban, Spanish, Conch, Bahamian...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (1): 140–142.
Published: 01 February 2019
... when enslaved Africans, Bahamian sailors, Cuban mariners, and English banditti sought refuge in the area. Finally, chapters 5 (“Becoming Southern”) and 6 (“The Armed Occupation of Fort Dallas”) analyze the slave community that prospered in the area in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (1): 1–153.
Published: 01 February 1996