Judging from the cover of this book, the reader might expect to learn about solidarity among guerrilla movements in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The dust jacket features a cover illustration from Tricontinental magazine of three armed fighters representing those continents. However, the author focuses not on armed insurrection but on the cultural activism of Afro-Cuban intellectuals and of African American and Latino activists in the United States. They took up not arms but typewriters, film cameras, and paintbrushes. Their protests and critiques of race relations drew inspiration from the Tricontinental Conference and from that organization's publications examining the injustices of racial capitalism worldwide. “The Tricontinental played a pivotal role in generating international solidarity with the US civil rights movement as well as with the antiapartheid struggle in South Africa,” Anne Garland Mahler says (p. 3).

Mahler shows that linkages existed between African Americans and Afro-Cubans long before the Havana...

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